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Application DeliveryCloud ComputingCloud Security

Embarking on a Cloud Journey: Expect More from Your Load Balancer

November 13, 2018 — by Prakash Sinha0

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Many enterprises are in transition to the cloud, either building their own private cloud, managing a hybrid environment – both physical and virtualized—or deploying on a public cloud. In addition, there is a shift from infrastructure-centric environments to application-centric ones. In a fluid development environment of continuous integration and continuous delivery, where services are frequently added or updated, the new paradigm requires support for needs across multiple environments and across many stakeholders.

When development teams choose unsupported cloud infrastructure without IT involvement, the network team loses visibility, and security and cost control is accountable over the service level agreement (SLA) provided once the developed application goes live.

The world is changing. So should your application delivery controller.

Application delivery and load balancing technologies have been the strategic component providing availability, optimization, security and latency reduction for applications. In order to enable seamless migration of business critical applications to the cloud, the same load balancing and application delivery infrastructure must now address the needs of continuous delivery/integration, hybrid and multi-cloud deployments.

[You may also like: Digital Transformation – Take Advantage of Application Delivery in Your Journey]

The objective here is not to block agile development and use of innovative services, but to have a controlled environment, which gives the organization the best of both DevOps and IT– that is, to keep a secure and controlled environment while enabling agility. The benefits speak for themselves:

Reduced shadow IT initiatives
To remain competitive, every business needs innovative technology consumable by the end‐user. Oftentimes, employees are driven to use shadow IT services because going through approval processes is cumbersome, and using available approved technology is complex to learn and use. If users cannot get quick service from IT, they will go to a cloud service provider for what they need. Sometimes this results in short‐term benefit, but may cause issues with organizations’ security, cost controls and visibility in the long-term. Automation and self-service address CI/CD demands and reduce the need for applications teams to acquire and use their own unsupported ADCs.

Flexibility and investment protection at a predictable cost
Flexible licensing is one of the critical elements to consider. As you move application delivery services and instances to the cloud when needed, you should be able to reuse existing licenses across a hybrid deployment. Many customers initially deploy on public cloud but cost unpredictability becomes an issue once the services scale with usage.

[You may also like: Load Balancers and Elastic Licensing]

Seamless integration with an SDDC ecosystem
As you move to private or public cloud, you should be able to reuse your investment in the orchestration system of your environment. Many developers are not used to networking or security nomenclature. Using self-service tools with which developers are familiar quickly becomes a requirement.

The journey from a physical data center to the cloud may sometimes require investments in new capabilities to enable migration to the new environment. If an application delivery controller capacity is no longer required in the physical data center, its capacity can be automatically reassigned. Automation and self-services applications address the needs of various stakeholders, as well as the flexible licensing and cost control aspects of this journey.

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

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Application DeliveryCloud Computing

Digital Transformation – Take Advantage of Application Delivery in Your Journey

October 31, 2018 — by Prakash Sinha0

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The adoption of new technologies is accelerating business transformation. In its essence, the digital transformation of businesses uses technologies to drive significant improvement in process effectiveness.

Cloud computing is one of the core technologies for Digital Transformation

Increasing maturity of cloud-based infrastructure enables organizations to deploy business-critical applications in public and private cloud. According to a new forecast from the International Data Corporation (IDCWorldwide Quarterly Cloud IT Infrastructure Tracker, total spending on IT infrastructure for deployment in cloud environments is expected to total $46.5 billion in 2017 with year-over-year growth of 20.9%. Public cloud data centers will account for the majority of this spending, 65.3%, growing at the fastest annual rate of 26.2%.

Many enterprises are in the midst of this transition to the cloud, whether moving to a public cloud, building their own private cloud or managing a hybrid deployment. In this fluid environment, where new services are being frequently added and old ones updated, the new paradigm requires support for needs across multiple environments and across many constituencies – an IT administrator, an application developer, DevOps and tenants.

[You might also like: Optimizing Multi-Cloud, Cross-DC Web Apps and Sites]

Nobody Said It Was Easy!

However, the process of migration of applications to the cloud is not easy. The flexibility and cost benefit that drives the shift to the cloud also presents many challenges – security, business continuity, and application availability, latency reduction, issues with visibility, SLA guarantees and isolation of resources.  Some other aspects that require some thought – licensing, lock-in with a cloud service provider, architecture to address hybrid deployment, shadow IT, automation, user access, user privacy, and compliance needs.

One of the main challenges for enterprises moving to a cloud infrastructure is how to guarantee consistent quality of experience to consumers across multiple applications, many of which are business critical developed using legacy technologies and still hosted on-premise.

Along with the quality of experience, organizations need to look at the security policies. Sometimes policies require integration with a cloud service provider’s infrastructure or require new capabilities to complement on-premises architecture while addressing denial of service, application security and compliance for new attack surface exposed by applications in the cloud.

Convenience and productivity improvements are often the initial drivers for adopting IT services in the cloud. One way to address security and availability concerns for the enterprise embarking on the cloud journey is to ensure that the security and availability are also included as part of IT self-service, orchestration and automation systems, without requiring additional effort from those driving adoptions of cloud-based IT applications.

The World of Application Delivery Has Changed to Adapt!

Application delivery and load balancing technologies have been the strategic components providing availability, optimization, security and latency reduction for applications. In order to enable seamless migration of business-critical applications to the cloud, the same load balancing and application delivery infrastructure has to evolve to address the needs of continuous delivery/integration, hybrid and multi-cloud deployments.

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

Download Now

Application DeliveryCloud ComputingSSL

LBaaS: Load Balancing for the Age of Cloud

February 9, 2015 — by Jim Frey0

Jim Frey is Vice President of Research, Network Management for Enterprise Management Associates (EMA) and is a featured guest blogger.

As organizations embrace the cloud, whether as enterprises looking to transform IT or providers expanding and enriching service offerings, traditional IT/networking technologies must be adapted to fit the form of the new reality. This is certainly true of load balancing (LB) as well as application delivery control (ADC), which has undergone virtualization and software programmability/orchestration evolutions.

Application DeliveryCloud Computing

Load balancing and application delivery in VMware vCloud. How to best serve your applications?

January 21, 2014 — by Lior Cohen1

Whether you are building a private cloud or deploying applications over a public cloud infrastructure, you will be using application delivery functionality such as load balancing to scale out application workloads. The level of required application delivery functionality differs between environments. While cutting edge web applications are often designed using REST oriented architectures which require the load balancer only to distribute traffic evenly, typical applications heavily rely on application delivery functionality such as SSL offloading, L7 policies, and session stickiness to properly operate. Furthermore, due to the strategic placement of ADCs in the application stack – in front of the application – security and performance optimization are natural extensions to effectively optimize application delivery.

Application DeliveryCloud ComputingService Provider

The “As-a-Service” Revolution: How Cloud-based Services are Reshaping the Enterprise

July 15, 2013 — by Travis Volk1

The growth of cloud-based services is challenging customers to second-guess their brick and mortar investments. From price and performance to state of the art technology, enterprises are ready to return the complex task of managing advanced services to cloud providers. This shift not only complements the mobile aspect of employee, consumer and partner interaction in today’s marketplace, but also allows enterprises to focus more on their core business, enabling further growth.

Application DeliveryCloud ComputingData CenterSDN

SDN Focus Shifts to Network Services

March 4, 2013 — by Brad Casemore0

Brad Casemore is Research Director for IDC’s Datacenter Networks practice and is a featured guest blogger.

Cloud computing requires a datacenter network and corresponding network services that are more flexible and responsive than traditional datacenter network architectures. Responding to that need, software-defined networking (SDN) has emerged as a means of realizing network virtualization and network programmability, while also ensuring that the network can deliver the virtualized network and security services that are essential to the provision of scalable multi-tenant services.

Application DeliveryApplication VirtualizationCloud Computing

Application Delivery Controllers (ADCs): The Last Physical Hurdle to the Software Defined Datacenter (SDDC)

December 21, 2012 — by Ron Meyran1

Effectively a next generation load balancer, enterprises are deploying Application Delivery Controllers (ADCs) to front-end their mission critical applications. The enterprise ADC market is mature with well established players and solutions. Yet when moving applications to the cloud – it’s a completely different playground. The business need is to support a new application life cycle—one that allows the business to scale across hybrid cloud environment.

In this post I will explore an application life cycle use case across hybrid cloud, and how to properly deploy an ADC in the cloud to support the application life cycle.

Application DeliveryApplication VirtualizationCloud Computing

How Cloud Ready Are You? Download Radware’s Alteon VA Blueprint Directly from the VMWare Cloud Application Marketplace

December 3, 2012 — by Ron Meyran0

Anyone intimately connected to the world of server virtualization and cloud computing is no stranger to the name VMware. From an early stage, Radware and VMware have been strategic partners, delivering comprehensive and cost-effective virtual ADC solutions for enterprises and carriers operating in the cloud. Today, with the release of VMware’s Application Director 5.0, the two companies are offering an integrated virtual ADC solution that helps customers simplify and automate the management of their Software-defined-Datacenters (SDDC). Radware’s Alteon VA with VMware’s provisioning solution VMware vFabric Application Director is now generally available for download on VMware’s Cloud Application Marketplace.