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Attack Types & VectorsDDoSSecurity

Gaming – Legitimate vs. Malicious Users

July 20, 2017 — by Daniel Smith0

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Over the years Radware has followed the evolution of DDoS attacks directed at the gaming industry. For the industry, large-scale DDoS attacks can result in network outages or service degradation and has become an everyday occurrence. In 2016 Lizard Squad and Poodle Corp launched repeated attacks against EA, Blizzard and Riot Games, resulting in service degradation and outages for users around the world.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

SMB Vulnerabilities – WannaCry, Adylkuzz and SambaCry

June 15, 2017 — by Daniel Smith1

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Last month on Friday, May 12th a global incident related to a ransomware variant named WannaCry broke out, targeting computers around the world. Everything from personal computers to corporate and university networks were affected by this campaign. The campaign spread across networks leveraging a recently disclosed vulnerability in Microsoft SMB service. On March 14th 2017, Microsoft released MS17-010, a security update, that addressed and patched six CVEs. Five were remote code executions and the sixth was related to information disclosure.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

WannaCrypt

May 16, 2017 — by Daniel Smith0

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Over the last few days, Radware’s Security Research Groups have been monitoring a global incident related to a ransomware variant named WannaCrypt, also known as WannaCry, WanaCrypt0r and wcry. On the morning of Friday May 12th, a ransomware campaign began targeting computers around the world. Once a computer was infected, a worm replicated itself across the network, targeting other computers as well. Worms use a computer network to propagate to other machines and infect them with the malicious payload.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

OpIsrael 2017

April 25, 2017 — by Daniel Smith1

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Ideology, politics and religious differences are at the core of operation OpIsrael. OpIsrael is launched by Anonymous with the stated goal of “erasing Israel from the internet” in protest against the Israeli governments’ conduct in the Israeli- Palestinian conflict. This is a yearly operation and was created in 2012. It starts every year on April 7th and ends on April 20th. This operation sees participants from Anonymous, AnonGhost, Red Cult, Anonymous Lebanon, Mauritania Attackers, Cyber Team Tox, M0oDyPL, MCA DDoS Team and LaResistance Hacking Team along with other independent attackers.

Attack Types & VectorsDDoSSecurity

The Expansion of IoT since Mirai.

March 22, 2017 — by Daniel Smith0

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The idea of an Internet of Things (IoT) botnet is nothing new in our industry. In fact, the threat has been discussed for many years by security researchers. It has only now gained public attention due to the release and rampage of the Mirai botnet. Since Mirai broke the 1Tbps mark in late 2016 the IoT threat has become a popular topic of conversation for many industries that utilize connected devices. Not only are companies worried about if their devices are vulnerable but they are also worried if those devices can be used to launch a DDoS attack, one possibly aimed at their own network.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

“For Educational Purposes Only”

February 15, 2017 — by Daniel Smith2

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Education, freedom and knowledge. These are the pillars for higher learning, but have often been used to describe some open source projects and services that have the potential to be abused by those that are not so innocent. Over the last two years, tools like stressers, Remote Administration Tools (RAT) and ransomware have been published under these pretenses, but do they serve a legitimate purpose? These projects have set off an international debate in the information security community and many wonder if they should be available to the public. Often the justification for these projects is that they are intending to show the potential risks so they can be used to prevent infections or reduce potential damage. With stressers, they claim that the services are to be used to improve and test security products and to understand attack behavior targeting their network. But are they?

Security

Internet Censorship / Open Internet

January 31, 2017 — by Daniel Smith2

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Earlier this month my colleague Carl Herberger wrote a blog post regarding how the internet was rolling back our freedoms. I would agree with him. As time moves forward, we are seeing more situations where no one can hide from their government as the internet closes around them. An open internet as we know it may be coming to an end as several countries begin moving towards the idea of a centralized gateway that is controlled by their government.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

2016 Attack Trends

December 6, 2016 — by Daniel Smith0

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2016 has been an eventful year when it comes to denial of service attacks. This year the industry as a whole has seen the largest attacks ever, and new attack vectors designed to test and challenge modern day defenses. Every year Radware’s ERT sees millions of attacks and our ERT Researchers throughout the year are constantly reviewing and analyzing these attacks to gain further insight into trends and changes in the attack vector landscape.

This year, two of the most common trends among attackers were burst attacks, aka “hit and run”, and advanced persistent denial of service (ApDoS) campaigns. Throughout the year we have observed a number of attackers using short bursts of high volume attacks in random intervals, and attacks that have lasted weeks, involving multiple vectors aimed at all network layers simultaneously. These types of attacks have a tendency to cause frequent disruptions in a network server’s SLA and can prevent legitimate users from accessing your services.