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BotnetsDDoS

Botnets: DDoS and Beyond

June 20, 2019 — by Daniel Smith1

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Traditionally, DDoS is an avenue of profit for botherders. But today’s botnets have evolved to include several attack vectors other than DDoS that are more profitable. And just as any business-oriented person would do, attackers follow the money.

As a result, botherders are targeting enterprise and network software, since residential devices have become over saturated. The days of simple credentials-based attacks are long behind us. Attackers are now looking for enterprise devices that will help expand their offerings and assists in developing additional avenues of profit.

A few years ago, when IoT botnets became all the rage, they were mainly targeting residential devices with simple credential attacks (something the DDoS industry does not prevent from happening; instead we take the position of mitigating attacks coming from infected residential devices).

[You may also like: IoT Botnets on the Rise]

From Personal to Enterprise

But now that attackers are targeting enterprise devices, the industry must reevaluate the growing threat behind today’s botnets.

We now have to focus on not only protecting the network from external attacks but also the devices and servers found in a typical enterprise network from being infected by botnet malware and leveraged to launch attacks.

In a blog posted on MIT’s Technology Review titled, Inside the business model for botnets, C.G.J. Putman and colleagues from the University of Twente in the Netherlands detail the economics of a botnet. The article sheds some light on the absence of DDoS attacks and the growth of other vectors of attack generated from a botnet.

In their report, the team states that DDoS attacks from a botnet with 30,000 infected devices could generate around $26,000 a month. While that might seem like a lot, it’s actually a drop in the bucket compared to other attack vectors that can be produced from a botnet.

For example, C.G.J. Putman and Associates reported that a spamming botnet with 10,000 infected devices can generate $300,000 a month. The most profitable? Click fraud, which can generate over $20 million per month in profit.

[You may also like: Ad Fraud 101: How Cybercriminals Profit from Clicks]

To put that in perspective, AppleJ4ck and P1st from Lizard Squad made close to $600,000 over 2 years’ operating a stresser service called vDoS.

So let me ask this: If you are a botherder risking your freedom for profit, are you going to construct a botnet strictly for DDoS attacks or will you construct a botnet with more architecturally diverse devices to support additional vectors of profit?

Exactly. Botherders will continue to maximize their efforts and profitability by targeting enterprise devices.

Read the “IoT Attack Handbook – A Field Guide to Understanding IoT Attacks from the Mirai Botnet and its Modern Variants” to learn more.

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Security

Are Darknet Take-Downs Effective?

May 29, 2019 — by Daniel Smith0

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Raids and take-downs have become standard on the Darknet as agents across the world continue to step up enforcement. While these take-downs are generally digital perp walks meant to remind the public that agents are doing their job, we have to ask, are they actually solving the problem?

Moreover, does the Darknet, specifically Tor, really matter in the grand scheme of things? No. Darknet marketplaces only provide a layer of protection. In fact, most of the items you find listed on any given Darknet marketplace can also find on normal Clearnet markets and forums. In reality, Darknet take-downs are only temporarily impacting, but do not prevent overall illicit activity.

For example, when you look at the sale of stolen data online you will find several major vendors that have sold databases throughout a variety of darknet marketplaces over the years. But databases containing PII and credentials are also sold on well-known Clearnet sites like Exploit, which is indexed by major search engines and has not been taken down to this day.

[You may also like: Understanding the Darknet and Its Impact on Cybersecurity]

DDoS-as-a-Service

When you look at attack services such as DDoS-as-a-Service, you will find that it was never a major player in Darknet marketplace, but during the rise of Mirai, a few vendors were found offering attack services with the newly publicized botnet. While vendors never fully adopted the use of hidden service, a few vendors sell overpriced DDoS services on Darknet marketplaces today. This is because most of the bot herders own and operate stresser services on Clearnet websites.

While Operation Power Off, a series of take-downs targeting the DDoS-as-a-Service industry, has been a major success in limiting the number of DDoS attacks, the powerful and customizable source code for IoT botnets like Mirai is still highly available. Because of this, the DDoS-as-a-Service market has become so over saturated that you can find entry-level vendors selling botnet spots with low bot counts on Instagram.

User advertises Mana Botnet on Instagram

More users with source code, more problems, no matter how many stresser services are taken down.

A Growing Criminal Landscape

In all, the digital marketplace, both on the clear and darknet, have allowed the criminal landscape to grow beyond street dealers with limited options and includes several new ways to make profit while not actually touching the products or services offered.

At the beginning of May, DeepDotWeb, a Clearnet site that listed current Darknet marketplaces and covered news related to the Darknet was raided and seized by law enforcement for referral linking. Most recently, news just broke that BestMixer, a multi-million-dollar cryptocurrency tumbler used to launder cryptocurrency was also raided.

As the tactics and techniques change, new avenues of profit will always open up.

At this point, it’s clear the landscape has changed dramatically over the last decade, and law enforcement is targeting the new ecosystem—but with limited success, in my opinion. Like low-level hackers, law enforcement is going for the low hanging fruit, and while it provides for great headlines and temporary impacts, it doesn’t truly solve anything and only creates more problems down range.

[You may also like: Darknet: Attacker’s Operations Room]

Stay Vigilant

I’ll leave you with an article titled, Libertas Market is Available Via I2P.

The use of hidden services (Tor) is only the beginning of the digital underground marketplace. Admin and vendors will continue to seek different methods to avoid law enforcement as long as demands and profits are high.

In other words, don’t fall into a false sense of security; the Darknet isn’t going anywhere anytime soon.

Download “Hackers Almanac” to learn more.

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Cloud Security

Managing Security Risks in the Cloud

May 8, 2019 — by Daniel Smith1

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Often, I find that only a handful of organizations have a complete understanding of where they stand in today’s threat landscape. That’s a problem. If your organization does not have the ability to identify its assets, threats, and vulnerabilities accurately, you’re going to have a bad time.

A lack of visibility prevents both IT and security administrators from accurately determining their actual exposure and limits their ability to address their most significant risk on premise. However, moving computing workloads to a publicly hosted cloud service exposes organizations to new risk by losing direct physical control over their workloads and relinquishing many aspects of security through the shared responsibility model.

Cloud-y With a Chance of Risk

Don’t get me wrong; cloud environments make it very easy for companies to quickly scale by allowing them to spin up new resources for their user base instantly. While this helps organizations decrease their overall time to market and streamline business process, it also makes it very difficult to track user permission and manage resources.

[You may also like: Excessive Permissions are Your #1 Cloud Threat]

As many companies have discovered over the years, migrating workloads to a cloud-native solution present new challenges when it comes to risk and threats in a native cloud environment.

Traditionally, computing workloads resided within the organization’s data centers, where they were protected against insider threats. Application protection was focused primarily on perimeter protections via mechanisms such as firewalls, intrusion prevention/detection systems (IPS/IDS), web application firewall (WAF) and distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) protection, secure web gateways (SWGs), etc.

However, moving workloads to the cloud has presented new risks for organizations. Typically, public clouds provide only basic protections and are mainly focused on securing their overall computing environments, leaving individual and organizations workloads vulnerable. Because of this, deployed cloud environment are at risk of not only account compromises and data breaches, but also resource exploitation due to misconfigurations, lack of visibility or user error.

[You may also like: Ensuring Data Privacy in Public Clouds]

The Details

The typical attack profile includes:

  • Spear phishing employees
  • Compromised credentials
  • Misconfigurations and excessive permissions
  • Privilege escalation
  • Data exfiltration

The complexity and growing risk of cloud environments are placing more responsibility for writing and testing secure apps on developers as well. While most are not cloud-oriented security experts, there are many things we can do to help them and contribute to a better security posture.

[You may also like: Anatomy of a Cloud-Native Data Breach]

Recent examples of attacks include:

  • A Tesla developer uploaded code to GitHub which contained plain-text AWS API keys. As a result, hackers were able to compromise Tesla’s AWS account and use Tesla’s resource for crypto-mining.
  • js published an npm code package in their code release containing access keys to their S3 storage buckets.

Mitigating Risk

The good news is that most of these attacks can be prevented by addressing software vulnerabilities, finding misconfigurations and deploying identity access management through a workload protection service.

With this in mind, your cloud workload protection solution should:

[You may also like: Embarking on a Cloud Journey: Expect More from Your Load Balancer]

There are many blind spots involved in today’s large-scale cloud environments. The right cloud workload protection reduces the attack surface, detects data theft activity and provides comprehensive protection in a cloud-native solution.

As the trend around cybercriminals targeting operational technologies continues, it’s critical to reduce organizational risk by rigorously enforcing protection policies, detecting malicious activity and improving response capabilities while providing insurance to the developers.

Read “The Trust Factor: Cybersecurity’s Role in Sustaining Business Momentum” to learn more.

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HacksSecurity

Here’s How You Can Better Mitigate a Cyberattack

April 16, 2019 — by Daniel Smith1

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Where does the attack landscape lead us into 2020? No one knows for sure, but strong indicators help Radware build logic chains to better forecast where the state of network security is heading in the future.  Last year alone, the initial attributable cost of cyberattacks increased by 52% and 93% of those surveyed in our 2018-2019 Global Application and Network Security report experienced a cyberattack over the previous 12 months.

cyberattack. hacker. cyber security.

Let’s face it, today you stand a better chance of mitigating an attack if you understand your risks and the threats you may suffer due to your exposure. Once you begin to understand your enemies’ tactics, techniques, and procedures (TTPs), you can then begin to understand your enemies’ intentions and ability to disrupt your network. This is a good thing. Once you understand the basics, you can then begin to forecast attacks, allowing operators time to prepare to identify and mitigate malicious activity.

[You may also like: Can You Crack The Hack?]

Preparing for the next generation of cyber attacks has become the new norm and requires organizations to stay ahead of the threat landscape. Radware’s Hackers Almanac is designed to help do exactly that by generating awareness about current TTPs used by cyber criminals. In the Hackers Almanac, we cover two main topics: Groups and Tools.

Clear and Present Dangers

In the Groups section, we cover APTs, Organized Crime, Extortionist, DDoS’ers, Political and Patriotic Hackers, as well as Malicious insiders. In the Tools section, we cover Ransomware variants, exploit kits, Trojans and Botnets, as well as consumer tools and other persistent threats that can be expected on an annual basis.

While these threats constitute a clear and present danger to most if not all networks, knowledge is power and the first step to securing your network starts with surveying and auditing. Ensure that your system is up to date and adequately patched. The second step is getting in front of the problem by studying cyber criminals, the way they operate and how they launch their attacks. By understanding your network and its limitations and how hackers launch attacks, your organization can better prepare for attack vectors commonly leveraged by different threats targeting your network

[You may also like: How Cyberattacks Directly Impact Your Brand]

There is no need to fight every battle at the end of the day when you can learn from those around you. Before securing your network, make sure to conduct an audit of your organization’s system and understand its vulnerabilities/weaknesses. Then, leverage this almanac to study the threats posed against your organization.

Download “Hackers Almanac” to learn more.

Download Now

Attack Types & Vectors

Can You Crack the Hack?

April 11, 2019 — by Daniel Smith1

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Let’s play a game. Below are clues describing a specific type of cyberattack; can you guess what it is?

  • This cyberattack is an automated bot-based attack
  • It uses automation tools such as cURL and PhantomJS
  • It leverages breached usernames and passwords
  • Its primary goal is to hijack accounts to access sensitive data, but denial of service is another consequence
  • The financial services industry has been the primary target

Struggling? We understand, it’s tricky! Here are two more clues:

  • Hackers will often route login requests through proxy servers to avoid blacklisting their IP addresses
  • It is a subset of Brute Force attacks, but different from credential cracking 

And the Answer Is….

Credential stuffing! If you didn’t guess correctly, don’t worry. You certainly aren’t alone. At this year’s RSA Conference, Radware invited attendees to participate in a #HackerChallenge. Participants were given clues and asked to diagnose threats. While most were able to surmise two other cyber threats, credential stuffing stumped the majority.

[You may also like: Credential Stuffing Campaign Targets Financial Services]

Understandably so. For one, events are happening at a breakneck pace. In the last few months alone, there have been several high-profile attacks leveraging different password attacks, from credential stuffing to credential spraying. It’s entirely possible that people are conflating the terms and thus the attack vectors. Likewise, they may also confuse credential stuffing with credential cracking.

Stuffing vs. Cracking vs. Spraying

As we’ve previously written, credential stuffing is a subset of brute force attacks but is different from credential cracking. Credential stuffing campaigns do not involve the process of brute forcing password combinations. Rather, they leverage leaked username and passwords in an automated fashion against numerous websites to take over users’ accounts due to credential reuse.

Conversely, credential cracking attacks are an automated web attack wherein criminals attempt to crack users’ passwords or PIN numbers by processing through all possible combines of characters in sequence. These attacks are only possible when applications do not have a lockout policy for failed login attempts. Software for this attack will attempt to crack the user’s password by mutating or brute forcing values until the attacker is successfully authenticated.

[You may also like: Bots 101: This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things]

As for credential (or password) spraying, this technique involves using a limited set of company-specific passwords in attempted logins for known usernames. When conducting these types of attacks, advanced cybercriminals will typically scan your infrastructure for external facing apps and network services such as webmail, SSO and VPN gateways. Usually, these interfaces have strict timeout features. Actors will use password spraying vs. brute force attacks to avoid being timed out and possibly alerting admins.

So What Can You Do?

A dedicated bot management solution that is tightly integrated into your Web Application Firewall (WAF) is critical. Device fingerprinting, CAPTCHA, IP rate-based detection, in-session detection and terminations JavaScript challenge is also important.

In addition to these steps, network operators should apply two-factor authentication where eligible and monitor dump credentials for potential leaks or threats.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

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Application SecurityAttack Types & VectorsSecurity

Bots 101: This is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things

March 19, 2019 — by Daniel Smith0

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In our industry, the term bot applies to software applications designed to perform an automated task at a high rate of speed. Typically, I use bots at Radware to aggregate data for intelligence feeds or to automate a repetitive task. I also spend a vast majority of time researching and tracking emerging bots that were designed and deployed in the wild with bad intentions.

As I’ve previously discussed, there are generally two different types of bots, good and bad. Some of the good bots include Search Bots, Crawlers and Feed Fetchers that are designed to locate and index your website appropriately so it can become visible online. Without the aid of these bots, most small and medium-sized businesses wouldn’t be able to establish an authority online and attract visitors to their site.

[You may also like: The Big, Bad Bot Problem]

On the dark side, criminals use the same technology to create bots for illicit and profitable activates such as scraping content from one website and selling it to another. These malicious bots can also be leveraged to take over accounts and generate fake reviews as well as commit Ad Fraud and stress your web applications. Malicious bots have even been used to create fake social media accounts and influence elections.

With close to half of all internet traffic today being non-human, bad bots represent a significant risk for businesses, regardless of industry or channel.

As the saying goes, this is why we can’t have nice things.

Targeted Industries

If a malicious bot targets an online business, it will be impacted in one way or another when it comes to website performance, sales conversions, competitive advantages, analytics or users experience. The good news is organizations can take actions against bot activity in real-time, but first, they need to understand their own risk before considering a solution.

[You may also like: Credential Stuffing Campaign Targets Financial Services]

  • E-Commerce – The e-commerce industry faces bot attacks that include account takeovers, scraping, inventory exhaustion, scalping, carding, skewed analytics, application DoS, Ad fraud, and account creation.
  • Media – Digital publishers are vulnerable to automated attacks such as Ad fraud, scraping, skewed analytics, and form spam.
  • Travel – The travel industries mainly deal with scraping attacks but can suffer from inventory exhaustion, carding and application DoS as well.
  • Social Networks – Social platforms deal with automated bots attacks such as account takeovers, account creation, and application DoS.
  • Ad Networks – Bots that create Sophisticated Invalid Traffic (SIVT) target ad networks for Ad fraud activity such as fraudulent clicks and impression performance.
  • Financial Institutions – Banking, financial and insurance industries are all high-value target for bots that leverage account takeovers, application DoS or content scraping.

Types of Application Attacks

It’s becoming increasingly difficult for conventional security solutions to track and report on sophisticated bots that are continuously changing their behavior, obfuscating their identity and utilizing different attack vectors for various industries. Once you begin to understand the risk posed by malicious automated bot you can then start to focus on the attack vectors you may face as a result of activity.

[You may also like: Adapting Application Security to the New World of Bots]

  • Account takeover – Account takeovers include credential stuffing, password spraying, and brute force attacks that are used to gain unauthorized access to a targeted account. Credential stuffing and password spraying are two popular techniques used today. Once hackers gain access to an account, they can begin additional stages of infection, data exfiltration or fraud.
  • Scraping – Scraping is the process of extracting data or information from a website and publishing it elsewhere. Content price and inventory scraping is also used to gain a competitive advantage. These scrape bots crawl your web pages for specific information about your products. Typically, scrapers steal the entire content from websites or mobile applications and publish it to gain traffic.
  • Inventory exhaustion – Inventory exhaustion is when a bot is used to add hundreds of items to a cart and later, abandon them to prevent real shoppers from buying the products.
  • Inventory scalping – Hackers deploy retail bots to gain an advantage to buy goods and tickets during a flash sale, and then resell them later at a much higher price.
  • Carding – Carders deploy bots on checkout pages to validate stolen-card-details, and to crack gift cards.
  • Skewed analytics – Automated invalid traffic directed at your e-commerce portal can skews metrics and misleads decision making when applied to advertisement budgets and other business decisions. Bots pollute metrics, disrupt funnel analysis, and inhibit KPI tracking.
  • Application DoS – Application DoS attacks slow down e-commerce portals by exhausting web servers resources, 3rd party APIs, inventory database and other critical resources to the point that they are unavailable for legitimate users.
  • Ad fraud – Bad bots are used to generate Invalid traffic designed to create false impressions and generate illegitimate clicks on websites and mobile apps.
  • Account creation – Bots are used to create fake accounts on a massive scale for content spamming, SEO and skewing analytics.

[You may also like: Bot or Not? Distinguishing Between the Good, the Bad & the Ugly]

Symptoms of a Bot Attack

  • A high number of failed login attempts
  • Increased chargebacks and transaction disputes
  • Consecutive login attempts with different credentials from the same HTTP client
  • Unusual request activity for selected application content and data
  • Unexpected changes in website performance and metrics
  • A sudden increase in account creation rate
  • Elevated traffic for certain limited-availability goods or services

Intelligence is the Solution

Finding a solution that arms partners and service providers with the latest information related to potential attacks are critical. In my opinion, a Bot Intelligence Feed is one of the best ways to gain insight into the threats you face while identifying malicious bots in real-time.

A Bot Intelligence Feed will provide you with information about the latest data on newly detected IPs for various bot categories like data center bots, bad user-agent, advanced persistent bots, backlink checker, monitoring bots, aggregators, social network bots, spam bots, as well as 3rd party fraud intelligence directories and services used to keep track of externally flagged IPs, ultimately giving organizations the best chance to proactively block security holes and take actions against emerging threat vectors.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

Download Now

Application SecurityPhishingSecurity

How Secure Is Your Digital Super Bowl Experience?

January 30, 2019 — by Daniel Smith0

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Over the last few years I have traveled around the world, researching and watching stadiums digitally evolve from the structures I once knew as a kid. I grew up watching the San Diego Chargers play in what was then called Jack Murphy Stadium and now find myself looking at stadiums from a totally different perspective.

As Super Bowl 53 approaches, my attention, along with Radware’s ERT, turns to the crowds and the target rich environments created by high profile sporting events.  This Super Bowl, like years before, will bring large crowds once again that will demand connectivity and are expected to consume record breaking volumes this year. Extreme Networks reported that last year’s attendees at Super Bowl 52 in Minnesota transferred 16.32 Terabytes of data with a peak rate of 7.867 Gbps!  This is an enormous demand for connectivity and the technology involved could poses a security risk for event organizers, partners, sponsors and attendees as their activities in the stadium begin to produce more digital oil–data.

A Seamless Digital Game Day Experience

There are few sporting events in the world as large as the Super Bowl. Last year there was an estimated 103 million viewers. The Super Bowl generates a lot of excitement from media, fans and the public. Beyond the hype of the game itself, there is a variety of multimedia technology available to fans, providing a more immersive and interactive experience. These experiences include Super Bowl Live, a 6-day series of concerts and events in Centennial Olympic Park in Downtown Atlanta, and the Super Bowl Experience, an 8-day event full of exhibits and interactive games inside the Georgia World Congress Center. Other events also include the Verizon Experience, which will showcase how 5G wireless technology will change the fan experience in stadiums going forward (something I’m personally looking forward to seeing).

To ensure Super Bowl attendees have a seamless digital experience, the NFL, Georgia World Congress Center, AMB Sports and Entertainment Group, and leading wireless carriers have made major investments into the construction and deployment of the current networks surrounding the stadium in order to maintain a high quality of service for the attendees and vendors at the Super Bowl. The stadium provides 15,000 Ethernet ports, 1,800 access points and a Distributed Antenna System (DAS), for enhanced cellular coverage. The DAS system is owned by the stadium and rented out to the four major US cellular carries for additional coverage. The stadiums WiFi is also provided by AT&T and consists of two redundant 40gb connections. The stadium also contains 2,000 IPTV for delivering game content provide by AT&T’s DirectTV. These features and network help ensure fans can watch, eat, share, download and communicate their game day experience with others.

When it comes to planning for the future, the stadium has pulled its fiber optics as close to the access points as possible, terminating in mini intermediate distribution frames (IDF) throughout the stadium. The network gear is from Aruba and Hewlett Packard Enterprise while others involved with the network include IBM, Corning and ThinkAmp. Recently, IBM and Corning built one of the more technology advanced stadiums with a blazing fast network for Texas A&M.

Wireless Access Point Under Stadium Seating

What’s more, Mercedes-Benz Stadium also promotes a mobile app. While this app is not as cutting edge as the one for Levi Stadium, for example, it does include information about the stadium, news, scores, as well as viewing, buying and transferring tickets and parking.

Assessing The Risks

There is always a potential risk at large sporting events like the Super Bowl. Even the smallest network outage could leave attendees unable to use their digital tickets to enter the game. Organizations such as the NFL, Patriots, Rams, Georgia World Congress Center, AMB Sports and Entertainment Group, wireless carriers, IBM Cloud, AT&T network or media outlets, as well as those considered partners, sponsors or supporters of Super Bowl 53, should take extra precautions and have an emergency plan in place.

For the Super Bowl, most cybercriminals will be focused on identity and financial theft in the days leading up to the game. These attacks will often be baited with promotions for Super Bowl ticket or a trip giveaway to Atlanta.

One of the other concerns at the Super Bowl will surround protecting critical applications and networks that support the events, hosted both locally and in the cloud. Broadcast networks, industrial control systems, civil-service networks and other related systems are all at risk as well. While there hasn’t been a recent attack of scale reported against the Super Bowl, last year we did witness a piece of malware named Olympic Destroyer that targeted and disrupted the opening ceremonies and entry into the 2018 Winter Olympics.

Indeed, major sporting events create a platform for cybercrime, though recently most cybercriminals have been focused on identity theft by spreading malicious software in a number of ways that’s designed to harvest and steal personal information. Today’s High Density (HD) Stadiums, theaters, arenas and amphitheaters require small cells, WIFI and DAS deployments to serve their demanding environment. Often, the technologies designed to enhance the spectators’ experience, such as Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and other digital services, are easily exploited to harvest information from attendees.

Protect Yourself

Technology can provide a more immersive and rewarding experience for fans, but it also create problems and security risks for those managing the event. Here are a few tips to consider if you’ll be joining me in the chaos next weekend in Atlanta for Super Bowl 53.

  • Charge your phone; you’re going to need that power to capture the experience
  • Ensure your phone is updated with the latest operating system
  • Disable Bluetooth when not in use
  • Disable Wi-Fi when not in use
  • Use the official event Wi-Fi when device is in use ‘attwifi’ (there will be no portal or advertisements. Join to Connect.)
  • Always use a VPN when using public Wi-Fi
  • Be careful when using ATMs – Understand how to spot and avoid card skimmers gathering card data.
  • Exercise caution when presented with pop-ups while browsing
  • Avoid NFL-related scams delivered via email.

Attack Types & VectorsDDoSDDoS Attacks

Top 3 Cyberattacks Targeting Proxy Servers

January 16, 2019 — by Daniel Smith0

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Today, many organizations are now realizing that DDoS defense is critical to maintaining an exceptional customer experience. Why? Because nothing diminishes load times or impacts the end user’s experience more than a cyberattack.

As a facilitator of access to content and networks, proxy servers have become a focal point for those seeking to cause grief to organizations via cyberattacks due to the fallout a successful assault can have.

Attacking the CDN Proxy

New vulnerabilities in content delivery networks (CDNs) have left many wondering if the networks themselves are vulnerable to a wide variety of cyberattacks. Here are five cyber “blind spots” that are often attacked – and how to mitigate the risks:

Increase in dynamic content attacks. Attackers have discovered that treatment of dynamic content requests is a major blind spot in CDNs. Since the dynamic content is not stored on CDN servers, all requests for dynamic content are sent to the origin’s servers. Attackers are taking advantage of this behavior to generate attack traffic that contains random parameters in HTTP GET requests. CDN servers immediately redirect this attack traffic to the origin—expecting the origin’s server to handle the requests. However, in many cases the origin’s servers do not have the capacity to handle all those attack requests and fail to provide online services to legitimate users. That creates a denial-of-service situation. Many CDNs can limit the number of dynamic requests to the server under attack. This means they cannot distinguish attackers from legitimate users and the rate limit will result in legitimate users being blocked.

SSL-based DDoS attacks. SSL-based DDoS attacks leverage this cryptographic protocol to target the victim’s online services. These attacks are easy to launch and difficult to mitigate, making them a hacker favorite. To detect and mitigate SSL-based attacks, CDN servers must first decrypt the traffic using the customer’s SSL keys. If the customer is not willing to provide the SSL keys to its CDN provider, then the SSL attack traffic is redirected to the customer’s origin. That leaves the customer vulnerable to SSL attacks. Such attacks that hit the customer’s origin can easily take down the secured online service.

[You may also like: SSL Attacks – When Hackers Use Security Against You]

During DDoS attacks, when web application firewall (WAF) technologies are involved, CDNs also have a significant scalability weakness in terms of how many SSL connections per second they can handle. Serious latency issues can arise. PCI and other security compliance issues are also a problem because they limit the data centers that can be used to service the customer. This can increase latency and cause audit issues.

Keep in mind these problems are exacerbated with the massive migration from RSA algorithms to ECC and DH-based algorithms.

Attacks on non-CDN services. CDN services are often offered only for HTTP/S and DNS applications.  Other online services and applications in the customer’s data center, such as VoIP, mail, FTP and proprietary protocols, are not served by the CDN. Therefore, traffic to those applications is not routed through the CDN. Attackers are taking advantage of this blind spot and launching attacks on such applications. They are hitting the customer’s origin with large-scale attacks that threaten to saturate the Internet pipe of the customer. All the applications at the customer’s origin become unavailable to legitimate users once the internet pipe is saturated, including ones served by the CDN.

[You may also like: CDN Security is NOT Enough for Today]

Direct IP attacks. Even applications that are served by a CDN can be attacked once attackers launch a direct hit on the IP address of the web servers at the customer’s data center. These can be network-based flood attacks such as UDP floods or ICMP floods that will not be routed through CDN services and will directly hit the customer’s servers. Such volumetric network attacks can saturate the Internet pipe. That results in degradation to application and online services, including those served by the CDN.

Web application attacks. CDN protection from threats is limited and exposes web applications of the customer to data leakage and theft and other threats that are common with web applications. Most CDN- based WAF capabilities are minimal, covering only a basic set of predefined signatures and rules. Many of the CDN-based WAFs do not learn HTTP parameters and do not create positive security rules. Therefore, these WAFs cannot protect from zero-day attacks and known threats. For companies that do provide tuning for the web applications in their WAF, the cost is extremely high to get this level of protection. In addition to the significant blind spots identified, most CDN security services are simply not responsive enough, resulting in security configurations that take hours to manually deploy. Security services are using technologies (e.g., rate limit) that have proven inefficient in recent years and lack capabilities such as network behavioral analysis, challenge-response mechanisms and more.

[You may also like: Are Your Applications Secure?]

Finding the Watering Holes

Waterhole attack vectors are all about finding the weakest link in a technology chain. These attacks target often forgotten, overlooked or not intellectually attended to automated processes. They can lead to unbelievable devastation. What follows is a list of sample watering hole targets:

  • App stores
  • Security update services
  • Domain name services
  • Public code repositories to build websites
  • Webanalytics platforms
  • Identity and access single sign-on platforms
  • Open source code commonly used by vendors
  • Third-party vendors that participate in the website

The DDoS attack on Dyn in 2016 has been the best example of the water-holing vector technique to date. However, we believe this vector will gain momentum heading into 2018 and 2019 as automation begins to pervade every aspect of our life.

Attacking from the Side

In many ways, side channels are the most obscure and obfuscated attack vectors. This technique attacks the integrity of a company’s site through a variety of tactics:

  • DDoS the company’s analytics provider
  • Brute-force attack against all users or against all of the site’s third-party companies
  • Port the admin’s phone and steal login information
  • Massive load on “page dotting”
  • Large botnets to “learn” ins and outs of a site

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

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Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Threat Alert: MalSpam

January 10, 2019 — by Daniel Smith0

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Radware researchers have been following multiple campaigns targeting the financial industry in Europe and the United States. These campaigns are designed to commit fraud via credential theft by sending MalSpam, malicious spam that contains banking malware like Trickbot and Emotet, to unsuspecting users. If the users open the document, they will become infected, and the malware will harvest and extract data from the victim’s machine for fraudulent purposes. Once the data is retrieved from their c2 server, the stolen credentials will be used to commit fraud against the victim’s bank account, leveraged in a credential stuffing attack or quickly sold for profit.

One of the things that make these two pieces of banking malware stand out is their ability to evolve and consistently update their modules to allow additional capabilities. Additionally, we have seen denial of service attacks in the past that have coincided with these security events. Occasionally attackers have been known to launch a flood of malicious traffic, known as a smoke screen attack, to distract network operators from other nefarious activity such as data exfiltration. These attacks typically will not exhaust network resources since the criminals still need access.

To read the full ERT Threat Alert, click here.

Attack Types & VectorsBotnetsSecurity

Ad Fraud 101: How Cybercriminals Profit from Clicks

January 3, 2019 — by Daniel Smith2

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Fraud is and always will be a cornerstone of the cybercrime community. The associated economic gains provide substantial motivation for today’s malicious actors, which is reflected in the rampant use of identity and financial theft, and ad fraud. Fraud is, without question, big business. You don’t have to look far to find websites, on both the clear and the darknet, that profit from the sale of your personal information.

Fraud-related cyber criminals are employing an evolving arsenal of tactics and malware designed to engage in these types of activities. What follows is an overview.

Digital Fraud

Digital fraud—the use of a computer for criminal deception or abuse of web enabled assets that results in financial gain—can be categorized and explained in three groups for the purpose of this blog: basic identity theft with the goal of collecting and selling identifiable information, targeted campaigns focused exclusively on obtaining financial credentials, and fraud that generates artificial traffic for profit.

Digital fraud is its own sub-community consistent with typical hacker profiles. You have consumers dependent on purchasing stolen information to commit additional fraudulent crime, such as making fake credit cards and cashing out accounts, and/or utilizing stolen data to obtain real world documents like identification cards and medical insurance. There are also general hackers, motivated by profit or disruption, who publicly post personally identifiable information that can be easily scraped and used by other criminals. And finally, there are pure vendors who are motivated solely by profit and have the skills to maintain, evade and disrupt at large scales.

[You may also like: IoT Hackers Trick Brazilian Bank Customers into Providing Sensitive Information]

  • Identity fraud harvests complete or partial user credentials and personal information for profit. This group mainly consists of cybercriminals who target databases with numerous attack vectors for the purposes of selling the obtained data for profit. Once the credentials reach their final destination, other criminals will use the data for additional fraudulent purposes, such as digital account takeover for financial gains.
  • Banking fraud harvests banking credentials, digital wallets and credit cards from targeted users. This group consists of highly talented and focused criminals who only care about obtaining financial information, access to cryptocurrency wallets or digitally skimming credit cards. These criminals’ tactics, techniques and procedures (TTP) are considered advanced, as they often involve the threat actor’s own created malware, which is updated consistently.
  • Ad fraud generates artificial impressions or clicks on a targeted website for profit. This is a highly skilled group of cybercriminals that is capable of building and maintaining a massive infrastructure of infected devices in a botnet. Different devices are leveraged for different types of ad fraud but generally, PC-based ad fraud campaigns are capable of silently opening an internet browser on the victim’s computer and clicking on an advertisement.

Ad Fraud & Botnets

Typically, botnets—the collection of compromised devices that are often referred to as a bot and controlled by a malicious actor, a.k.a. a “bot herder—are associated with flooding networks and applications with large volumes of traffic. But they also send large volumes of malicious spam, which is leveraged to steal banking credentials or used to conduct ad fraud.

However, operating a botnet is not cheap and operators must weigh the risks and expense of operating and maintaining a profitable botnet. Generally, a bot herder has four campaign options (DDoS attacks, spam, banking and ad fraud) with variables consisting of research and vulnerability discovery, infection rate, reinfection rate, maintenance, and consumer demand.

[You may also like: IoT Botnets on the Rise]

With regards to ad fraud, botnets can produce millions of artificially generated clicks and impressions a day, resulting in a financial profit for the operators. Two recent ad fraud campaigns highlight the effectiveness of botnets:

  • 3ve, pronounced eve, was recently taken down by White Owl, Google and the FBI. This PC-based botnet infected over a million computers and utilized tens of thousands of websites for the purpose of click fraud activities. The infected users would never see the activity conducted by the bot, as it would open a hidden browser outside the view of the user’s screen to click on specific ads for profit.
  • Mirai, an IoT-based botnet, was used to launch some of the largest recorded DDoS attacks in history. When the co-creators of Mirai were arrested, their indictments indicated that they also engaged in ad fraud with this botnet. The actors were able to conduct what is known as an impression fraud by generating artificial traffic and directing it at targeted sites for profit. 

[You may also like: Defending Against the Mirai Botnet]

The Future of Ad Fraud

Ad fraud is a major threat to advertisers, costing them millions of dollars each year. And the threat is not going away, as cyber criminals look for more profitable vectors through various chaining attacks and alteration of the current TTPs at their disposal.

As more IoT devices continue to be connected to the Internet with weak security standards and vulnerable protocols, criminals will find ways to maximize the profit of each infected device. Currently, it appears that criminals are looking to maximize their new efforts and infection rate by targeting insecure or unmaintained IoT devices with a wide variety of payloads, including those designed to mine cryptocurrencies, redirect users’ sessions to phishing pages or conduct ad fraud.

Read the “IoT Attack Handbook – A Field Guide to Understanding IoT Attacks from the Mirai Botnet and its Modern Variants” to learn more.

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