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WPO

Performance Bottlenecks Evident in the Top 50 Sites of Multiple Industries

March 22, 2016 — by Kent Alstad5

Web pages are trying to do too many things, and often failing to optimize along the way.

It’s not just ecommerce sites, either: for this quarter’s State of the Union Report, we decided to look at the top 50 websites of four key industries to see what web performance bottlenecks were prevalent, and we learned quite a bit in analyzing news, travel and sports sites, along with ecommerce.

WPO

When Research Findings Challenge Our Conventions

November 2, 2015 — by Kent Alstad4

What do you do when you discover something that might be disruptive in your field?

For some, the notion of sitting on findings that might rock the boat might hold some appeal, especially if those findings challenge the conventions dominating the way we work and approach problems. After all, they wouldn’t be “conventions” if they weren’t widely-adopted and accepted.

WPO

The (Context) Sensitivity of Speed

April 28, 2015 — by Kent Alstad3

Traditionally, when we look at web performance, we create a time-series graph that focuses on dimensions like browser or page template. These are all technically-oriented measurements that are collected automatically based on what is readily available. Last year at the Velocity conference, I met Anh-Tuan Gai from WebPerf IO who showed me a more business-oriented approach to visualizing performance data. I found his approach very interesting and asked him to collaborate on sharing the approach for Web Performance Today.

WPO

New Findings: State of the Union for Ecommerce Page Speed and Web Performance [Spring 2015]

April 15, 2015 — by Kent Alstad6

There are compelling arguments why companies – particularly online retailers – should care about serving faster pages to their users. Countless studies have found an irrefutable connection between load times and key performance indicators ranging from page views to revenue.

For every 1 second of improvement, Walmart.com experienced up to a 2% conversion increase. Firefox reduced average page load time by 2.2 seconds, which increased downloads by 15.4% — resulting in an estimated 10 million additional downloads per year. And when auto parts retailer AutoAnything.com cut load times in half, it experienced a 13% increase in sales.

Recently at Radware, we released our latest research into the performance and page speed of the world’s top online retailers. This research aims to answer the question: in a world where every second counts, are retailers helping or hurting their users’ experience – and ultimately their own bottom line?