Tammy Everts

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As a former senior researcher, writer, and solution evangelist for Radware, Tammy Everts spent years researching the technical, business, and human factor sides of web/application performance. Before joining Radware, Tammy shared her research findings through countless blog posts, presentations, case studies, whitepapers, articles, reports, and infographics for Strangeloop Networks.

Why Ecommerce Sites That Use a CDN Take Longer to Become Interactive (and Why You Still Need a CDN)

One of the most provocative findings in our latest State of the Union for Ecommerce Web Performance was the fact that using a content delivery network correlated to slower performance for retail sites. In today's post, we'll explore what this finding means (hint: correlation doesn't mean causation) and why you still need a CDN in your performance toolkit.

Every Second Counts [VIDEO]

One of the reasons why I love this video is that it does a better job than any other material I've seen (and I've seen a LOT of material) to tell a real-world story of what a page delay feels like in our modern world and how it can throw some unpleasant friction into your day.

Spring 2014 State of the Union: Ecommerce Page Speed & Web Performance [INFOGRAPHIC]

Last week, we released our quarterly State of the Union for ecommerce web performance, which found (among other things) that the median top 100 retail site takes 5.4 seconds to render primary content, and 10.7 seconds to fully load.

New findings: Retail sites that use a CDN are slower than sites that do not*

*NB: Don't panic. Correlation does not equal causation. More on that later in this post. In our latest quarterly research into the performance of the top 500 ecommerce sites, we found that while 75% of the top 100 websites use a content delivery network, CDN usage doesn't correlate to faster load times. Sites that use a CDN take a full second longer to render primary content than their non-CDN-using counterparts. Today, I want to discuss why these findings aren't as surprising as they sound, what CDNs fix versus what they can't fix, and how site owners can ensure they're covering all their performance bases.

REPORT: State of the Union for Ecommerce Web Performance [Spring 2014]

A typical leading ecommerce website takes longer to render than it did just three months ago, top sites are slower than the rest of the pack, and sites that use a content delivery network (CDN) are slower than sites that do not. These are just a few of the findings detailed in our latest research into the performance of the top 500 retail sites.

7 Mobile Web Performance Myths Debunked

There are a handful of assumptions that frequently come up when we read and talk about mobile performance. Today, I want to review the most common myths, discuss why they persist, and explain why they are incorrect.

How Does Web Page Speed Affect Conversions? [INFOGRAPHIC]

Performance has only recently started to make headway into the conversion rate optimization (CRO) space. These inroads are long overdue, but still, it's good to see movement. In the spirit of doing my part to hustle thing along, here's a collection of infographics representing real-world examples of the huge impact of page speed on conversions.

How Slow Pages Hurt the Entire User Experience [SLIDES]

Earlier this week, I had the privilege of speaking at the RWD Summit, alongside awesome folks like Tim Kadlec, Brad Frost, and Jenn Lukas. I presented some of the findings of research we conducted here at Radware about how mobile users engage with ecommerce sites, and how this engagement is affected when pages are slowed down even by marginal amounts.

Waterfalls 101: How to use a waterfall chart to diagnose your website’s performance pains

If you’ve been following along with this site over the past four years, you may recall this post, which offered an introduction to waterfall charts. Given that the post is now a few years old, I think it merits a refresh.

Case Studies: Three Benefits of Automated Performance Optimization

If you go looking for case studies that prove the business value of improving website performance, chances are you’ll encounter a number of studies that focus on obvious ecommerce metrics like cart size and sales. But there are a number of other ways that improving performance can move other business metrics. Today, I want to highlight a few of these metrics using some customer case studies.