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Attack Types & Vectors

Empowering the Infosec Community

September 19, 2019 — by Ben Zilberman0

Despite the technological advancements, innovation, and experience the knights of the cyber order have acquired over the past 25 years or so, the “bad guys” are still a step ahead. Why? In large part, because of the power of community.

While information security vendors live in a competitive market and must protect their intellectual property, hackers communicate, share information and contribute to each other’s immediate success and long-term skill set.

The Infosec Community

In recent years, we’ve seen more partnerships and collaborations between infosec vendors. For example, the Cyber Threat Alliance (of which Radware is a member) enables cybersecurity practitioners to share credible cyber threat information. Each vendor collects and shares security incidents detected by their security solutions, honeypots and research teams worldwide in order to disrupt malicious actors and protect end-users.

Similarly, several vendors offer live threat maps, which, as the name suggests, help detect live attacks as they’re launched.

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Radware’s Live Threat Map, which is open to the public, presents near real-time information on cyberattacks–from scanners to intruders to DDoS and web application hacks–as they occur, based on our global threat deception network (comprised of distributed honeypots that collect information about active threat actors), and cloud systems’ event information. The systems transmit a variety of anonymized and sampled network and application attacks to our Threat Research Center and are shared with the community.

More specifically, our machine learning algorithms profile the attackers and their intent, the attack vector and target – be it a network, a server, an IoT device or an application. Various validation mechanisms assure high-fidelity and minimize false positives. This makes our map sturdy and essentially flawless, if I say so myself.

Visibility Is Key

Detecting live attacks despite all evasion mechanisms is just the first step. The “good guys” must also translate these massive data lakes into guidance for those who wish to gain a better understanding of what, exactly, we’re monitoring and how they can improve their own security posture.

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Visibility is key to achieving this. The fact is, the market is overwhelmed with security technologies that constantly generate alerts; but to fight attackers and fend off future cyber attacks, businesses need more than notifications. They need guidance and advanced analytics.

For example, the ability to dig into data related to their own protected objects, while enjoying a unified view of all application and network security events with near real-time alerts via customizable dashboards (like Radware provides) will go a long way towards improving security posture — not just for individual companies, but the infosec community as a whole.

Download Radware’s “Hackers Almanac” to learn more.

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Ben Zilberman

Ben Zilberman is a product-marketing manager in Radware’s security team. In this role, Ben specializes in application security and threat intelligence, working closely with Radware’s Emergency Response and research teams to raise awareness of high profile and impending attacks. Ben has a diverse experience in network security, including firewalls, threat prevention, web security and DDoS technologies. Prior to joining Radware, Ben served as a trusted advisor at Checkpoint Software technologies where he led partnerships, collaborations, and campaigns with system integrators, service, and cloud providers. Ben holds a BA in Economics and a MBA, from Tel Aviv University.

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