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Attack MitigationSecurity

Consolidation in Consumer Products: Could it Solve the IoT Security Issues?

October 9, 2018 — by David Hobbs1

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In 2003, I went to Zermatt, Switzerland to go snowboarding under the Matterhorn. We had an eclectic group of people from all over the world. Some of us were enthusiasts, some ski patrol or medics, and a few were backcountry avalanche trained. Because of this, we had a lot of different gear with us, including ice saws, shovels, probes, avalanche beacons, radios, etc. In addition to the gear we carried, we also brought cameras, cell phones, MP3 players and of course, large battery charger bays with international inverters/adapters to keep everything going. I had a backpack with all the avalanche and snow testing gear. In my jacket, I carried an avalanche beacon,  digital camera,  flip cell phone,  family radio with a long external mic, GPS, and an MP3 player with headphones. I felt like I was Batman with all the gear crammed all over the place. I told one of my friends on the trip that one day all of this technology would be consolidated into one device – radio, phone, camera, MP3 player, and avalanche beacon. My friends thought I was crazy and that it would never happen. Fast forward to the smartphone where we now have it all, with the exception of Avalanche beacon, in one device.

To think that many of us had these “point solutions” in our personal tech and now it’s all consolidated into one makes me wonder when will we consolidate at home?

The future of the smart home

I have a Zigbee bridge for my lights, a Zigbee bridge for my blinds, 5 smart speakers, solar panels on the blinds (to charge them and get heat/sunlight measures), smart smoke detectors, smart locks, IP cameras, smart watering system for the plants, smart lights, smart alarm, UTM firewall, WiFi mesh, etc. These are all point solutions. Some of them are really neat and probably should stay point solution based, but what if the technology companies today were to start thinking about consolidating and adding security into the mix?

[You might also like: Cities Paying Ransom: What Does It Mean for Taxpayers?]

I’ve started to look at upgrading my home WiFi network as my smart TV and smart streaming box are now struggling to play streaming movies. After looking at some of the new consumer level WiFi mesh solutions, they show a lot of promise. One of the vendors I’m considering offers not only an easy to set up mesh WiFi, but they also provide automatic channel changing for WiFi radio frequencies to find the fastest radio, as well as automatically move devices around to access points. One of them offers VPN services as well as anti-virus and content filtering, (keeping you safe from malicious websites) and giving out tokens for guests and keeping them on their own network. This all looks great, but I started to think back to Zermatt, Switzerland.

What if the smart home speaker manufacturers wanted to really capture the market? What if you could get a smart speaker that had both a WiFi Mesh Access Point, Zigbee/Zwave access point (for lights, controllers, etc), and cloud-based security features in it? If I could drop a new smart speaker in any room and set it up in 3-5 minutes and have it join my wireless mesh network, it could cover a lot of territories quickly. Now, if one of them were the base unit that plugged into the internet router, it could be the main interface for security. Take all the device groups and help suggest security policies to keep them from talking to things they shouldn’t (like the cameras should never talk to the smart watering controller). What if it could look for IoT threats that spread internally as well as connections to malware Command and Control servers?

Security should be a priority

In terms of the security that could easily be offered and bundled across this platform could be things like VPN (both to and from the home network). This could allow you to browse safely while using public WiFi. You could also access any home devices that may not be very secure from the manufacturers like IP cameras and DVR’s without having to expose them to the world. Cloud-based security offerings could do things like look for malware infections and requests to malware botnet controllers. Then, layers like intrusion prevention and active WiFi defense layers could help detect if hackers were aiming at getting onto the network and doing harm. And finally, putting all of these offerings into a single pane of glass for visibility would definitely be attractive to end customers.

Granted, I know this could put the point solution providers in a position where their WiFi solutions and home routers become less valuable to the mainstream. But what if we got better antivirus and IOT protection? I can only dream of the day that we as consumers are able to consolidate all of our home networks to a real smart home-based solution. I know in the enterprise IT market; we have gained the popularity of Unified Threat Management platforms. Firewalls that do Intrusion Prevention, Wireless Intrusion Prevention, Inline Antivirus, Content Filtering, Guest and networks. I think the next logical step is to see all of these features consolidated into the next generation smart home speakers. How long will it take to see this reality? I don’t know. Will people think this idea is crazy? Probably.

Update: At the time of writing this, there has been an announcement from one of the smart home speaker manufacturers for a new smart home speaker. This new line will actually include a smart home hub in the speaker.  Nothing has been said as to whether it provides any security features.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

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Application SecurityAttack MitigationSecurityWeb Application Firewall

Are Your Applications Secure?

October 3, 2018 — by Ben Zilberman2

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Executives express mixed feelings and a surprisingly high level of confidence in Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report. 

As we close out a year of headline-grabbing data breaches (British Airways, Under Armor, Panera Bread), the introduction of GDPR and the emergence of new application development architectures and frameworks, Radware examined the state of application security in its latest report. This global survey among executives and IT professionals yielded insights about threats, concerns and application security strategies.

The common trend among a variety of application security challenges including data breaches, bot management, DDoS mitigation, API security and DevSecOps, was the high level of confidence reported by those surveyed. 90% of all respondents across regions reported confidence that their security model is effective at mitigating web application attacks.

Attacks against applications are at a record high and sensitive data is shared more than ever. So how can execs and IT pros have such confidence in the security of their applications?

To get a better understanding, we researched the current threat landscape and application protection strategies organizations currently take. Contradicting evidence stood out immediately:

  • 90% suffered attacks against their applications
  • One in three shared sensitive data with third parties
  • 33% allowed third parties to create/modify/delete data via APIs
  • 67% believed a hacker can penetrate their network
  • 89% saw web-scraping as a significant threat to their IP
  • 83% run bug bounty programs to find vulnerabilities they miss

There were quite a few threats to application services that were not properly addressed, challenging traditional security approaches. In parallel, the adoption of emerging frameworks and architectures, which rely on numerous integrations with multiple services, adds more complexity and increases the attack surface.

Current Threat Landscape

Last November, OWASP released a new list of top 10 vulnerabilities in web applications. Hackers continue to use injections, XSS, and a few old techniques such as CSRF, RFI/LFI and session hijacking to exploit these vulnerabilities and gain unauthorized access to sensitive information. Protection is becoming more complex as attacks come through trusted sources such as a CDN, encrypted traffic, or APIs of systems and services we integrate with. Bots behave like real users and bypass challenges such as CAPTCHA, IP-based detection and others, making it even harder to secure and optimize the user experience.

[You might also like: WAFs Should Do A  Lot More Against Current Threats Than Covering OWASP Top 10]

Web application security solutions must be smarter and address a broad spectrum of vulnerability exploitation scenarios. On top of protecting the application from these common vulnerabilities, it has to protect APIs and mitigate DoS attacks, manage bot traffic and make a distinction between legitimate bots (search engines for instance) and bad ones like botnets, web-scrapers and more.

DDoS Attacks

63% suffered a denial of service attack against their application. DoS attacks render applications inoperable by exhausting the application resources. Buffer overflow and HTTP floods were the most common types of DoS attacks, and this form of attack is more common in APAC. 36% find HTTP/Layer-7 DDoS as the most difficult attack to mitigate. Half of the organizations take rate-based approaches (such as limiting the number of request from a certain source or simply buying a rate-based DDoS protection solution) which are ineffective once the threshold is exceeded and real users can’t connect.

API Attacks

APIs simplify the architecture and delivery of application services and make digital interactions possible. Unfortunately, they also introduce a wide range of risks and vulnerabilities as a backdoor for hackers to break into networks. Through APIs, data is exchanged in HTTP where both parties receive, process and share information. A third party is theoretically able to insert, modify, delete and retrieve content from applications. This is nothing but an invitation to attack:

  • 62% of respondents did not encrypt data sent via API
  • 70% of respondents did not require authentication
  • 33% allowed third parties to perform actions (GET/ POST / PUT/ DELETE)

Attacks against APIs:

  • 39% Access violations
  • 32% Brute-force
  • 29% Irregular JSON/XML expressions
  • 38% Protocol attacks
  • 31% Denial of service
  • 29% Injections

Bot Attacks

The amount of both good and bad bot traffic is growing. Organizations are forced to increase network capacity and need to be able to precisely tell a friend from a foe so both customer experience and security are maintained. Surprisingly, 98% claimed they can make such a distinction. However, a similar amount sees web-scraping as a significant threat. 87% were impacted by such an attack over the past 12 months, despite a variety of methods companies use to overcome the challenge – CAPTCHA, in-session termination, IP-based detection or even buying a dedicated anti-bot solution.

Impact of Web-scraping:

  • 50% gathered pricing information
  • 43% copied website
  • 42% theft of intellectual property
  • 37% inventory queued/being held by bots
  • 34% inventory held
  • 26% inventory bought out

Data Breaches

Multinational organizations keep close tabs on what kinds of data they collect and share. However, almost every other business (46%) reports having suffered a breach. On average an organization suffers 16.5 breach attempts every year. Most (85%) take between hours and days to discover. Data breaches are the most difficult attack to detect, as well as mitigate, in the eyes of our survey respondents.

How do organizations discover data breaches?

  • 69% Anomaly detection tools/SIEM
  • 51% Darknet monitoring service
  • 45% Information was leaked publicly
  • 27% Ransom demand

IMPACT OF ATTACKS

Negative consequences such as loss of reputation, customer compensation, legal action (more common in EMEA), churn (more common in APAC), stock price drops (more common in AMER) and executives who lose their jobs are quick to follow a successful attack, while the process of repairing the damage of a company’s reputation is long and not always successful. About half admitted having encountered such consequences.

Securing Emerging Application Development Frameworks

The rapidly growing amount of applications and their distribution across multiple environments requires adjustments that lead to variations once a change to the application is needed. It is nearly impossible to deploy and maintain the same security policy efficiently across all environments. Our research shows that ~60% of all applications undergo changes on a weekly basis. How can the security team keep up?

While 93% of organizations use a web application firewall (WAF), only three in ten use a WAF that combines both positive and negative security models for effective application protection.

Technologies Used By DevOps

  • 63% – DevOps and Automation Tools
  • 48% – Containers (3 in 5 use Orchestration)
  • 44% – Serverless / FaaS
  • 37% – Microservers

Among the respondents that used micro-services, one-half rated data protection as the biggest challenge, followed by availability assurance, policy enforcement, authentication, and visibility.

Summary

Is there a notion that organizations are confident? Yes. Is that a false sense of security? Yes. Attacks are constantly evolving and security measures are not foolproof. Having application security tools and processes in place may provide a sense of control but they are likely to be breached or bypassed sooner or later. Another question we are left with is whether senior management is fully aware of the day to day incidents. Rightfully so, they look to their internal teams tasked with application security to manage the issue, but there seems to be a disconnect between their perceptions of the effectiveness of their organizations’ application security strategies and the actual exposure to risk.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

Download Now

Attack MitigationAttack Types & VectorsSecurity

Top Cryptomining Malware. Top Ransomware.

August 21, 2018 — by Fabio Palozza2

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In 2018, cryptominers have emerged as the leading attack vector used by cybercriminals to gain access into others systems. Cryptominers are getting advanced makeovers by cybercriminals doing their best to develop innovative cryptominers with ground-breaking capabilities. The recently-discovered cryptominers are not only known for their advanced features, but also for their capabilities to attack a wide range of systems including cloud-based platforms, mobile devices, industrial IT-infrastructure, and servers.

It’s not surprising that cybercriminals have started targeting cloud infrastructures which are based on rich classes of strong computing resources and companies that use cloud platforms to store confidential information. Two of the most striking data breaches that we witnessed this past year were the Monero-miner attack on Tesla’s cloud servers and the data-leak incident that affected FedEx customers.

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Top Cryptomining Malware That Is Dominating the Cybercrime Scene in 2018

The most popular web-based Monero currency miner, Coinhive, undoubtedly occupies the first spot regionally and globally with 25 percent of the companies being affected. With the introduction of Coinhive’s JavaScript mining code in September 2017, the code has been incorporated into thousands of websites allowing cybercriminals to capitalize on visitors’ computing resources. Additionally, the code can be used as substitutes for online advertisements that cybercriminals use to lure visitors to click malicious links. In 2018, threat actors have delivered Coinhive in innovative ways through Google’s DoubleClick service and Facebook Messenger, with code embedded in websites or by hiding code inside YouTube ads. Along with Coinhive, other miners, including Jesscoin and Cryptoloot, have been dominating the malicious cryptomining landscape this year, affecting almost 40 percent of businesses and consumers across the globe.

[You Might Also Like: Raising the Bar for Ethical Cryptocurrency Mining]

RIG Exploit Kit is increasingly being used by cybercriminals to capitalize on system vulnerabilities both regionally and globally. RIG Exploit kits typically work by redirecting people to a landing page that features an embedded JavaScript, the main purpose of which is to identify security flaws in the browser. Cybercriminals use RIG kits to deliver exploits for Internet Explorer, Java, Flash, and Silverlight.  RIG Exploit kits ruled the cybercrime scene in the first half of 2018, moving payloads such as cryptominers and Smoke Loader down the ranking.

XMRig, which is an open-source application for CPU-mining, occupies the third spot across all regions in the United States. The XMrig mining code, which gained popularity in early 2018, has been widely used by a number of crypto-strains, including RubyMiner which is specifically designed to target unpatched Linus servers and Windows. According to Check Point, cybercriminals targeted 30 percent of all business networks to utilize server capacities to support their mining operations.

When it comes to ransomware, Locky, which was first introduced in 2016, occupies the first spot in regional and global lists. Wannacry, which came into the scene in 2017 and made its way to thousands of systems continues to hold a high rank this year.

Read “Consumer Sentiments: Cybersecurity, Personal Data and The Impact on Customer Loyalty” to learn more.

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Attack MitigationDDoS AttacksSecurity

Obama’s Cyber-Security Proposals: Does this Safe Platform Translate to a Safer Network?

January 21, 2015 — by Ben Desjardins0

President Obama’s mention of cyber-security in last night’s State of the Union Address came as no surprise.  The Obama camp implemented a novel approach this year of “previewing” the President’s main agenda items through a series of speeches in the week preceding the SOTU. But even without the preview, the comments on cyber-security were rather predictable (and brief).

Attack MitigationSecurity

Read this List and Check it Twice — How to Protect Your Retail Business From Cyber-Attacks This Shopping Season

November 25, 2014 — by Shira Sagiv1

As consumers are getting their shopping lists ready for the biggest shopping days of the year, businesses should get ready as well.  Cyber-attacks, and most notably DDoS attacks, are more likely to occur on high traffic days – in fact, according to a 2013 eCommerce Cyber Crime Report conducted by the Ponemon Institute, 64% of respondents say "their organizations have seen an increase in Internet fraud and/or website attacks on high traffic days such as Cyber Monday." 

Attack MitigationSecurity

The “Easy Button” for Cyber-Attack Mitigation: Introducing Radware’s Attack Mitigation Service

November 18, 2014 — by Carl Herberger2

Advancements are continually being made to defend organizations from cyber-attacks. I wanted to take some time to share some powerful reminders of how diligence in approach is needed.

Organizations that used to rely on their service provider’s DDoS protection service (in-the-cloud) found that the attacks that hit their business could and would bypass the provider’s protection layer.  This is because DDoS is a tactic, not the overall problem.  Attacks borne from the Internet are the problem and solutions designed to handle a simple tactic, wind up falling short.

Attack MitigationDDoS AttacksSecurity

Tsunami SYN Flood Attack – A New Trend in DDoS Attacks?

October 8, 2014 — by Radware28

Over the past week Radware’s Emergency Response Team (ERT) detected a new type of SYN flood which is believed to be specially designed to overcome most of today’s security defenses with a TCP-based volume attack. Within a 48-hour period two different targets in two different continents were targeted with this new technique and have experienced very high attack volumes.

Attack MitigationDDoS AttacksSecurity

6 Types of DDoS Protection for Your Business

July 14, 2014 — by David Monahan2

David Monahan is Research Director for Enterprise Management Associates (EMA) and is a featured guest blogger.

DDoS attacks have become commonplace these days.  The offending attackers may be hacktivists, cyber-criminals, and nation states or just about anyone else with an Internet grudge and a PayPal or Bitcoin account.  These attacks themselves often require no technical skill.  Someone with a bone to pick can simply purchase the use of any number of nodes on one or more botnets for an hourly fee (long term rate discounts available); use a Graphical User Interface (GUI) to organize the attack and then launch it.

Attack MitigationDDoS AttacksSecurity

Cyber Attacks on Oil and Gas

July 11, 2014 — by David Hobbs1

A few weeks ago, news agencies shared reports on the Energetic Bear attack. This cyber-attack, or rather virus, was reportedly introduced by a Russian hacking group and it targeted oil, gas, power, and energy investment companies. The threatening malware had the ability to shut down major power grids, oil pipelines, gas, and energy traders. Analysts speculate that the attack motive was to gain competitive advantage in state-sponsored espionage against global oil and energy producers.