main

Attack Types & VectorsDDoSSecurity

See Through the DDoS Smoke-Screen to Protect Sensitive Data

January 26, 2017 — by Paul Mazzucco0

ddos-as-a-smokescreen-960x640.jpg

DDoS attacks can be costly and risky. TierPoint is witnessing a growing trend of using such attacks as the means to another, potentially more devastating, end: stealing sensitive data. Call this new breed of attack the “DDDoS”—deceptive distributed denial-of-service. For two recent examples, look to attacks on Carphone Warehouse and Linode. By bombarding Carphone Warehouse with online traffic, hackers were able to steal the personal and banking details of 2.4 million people. Similarly, cloud provider Linode suffered more than 30 DDoS attacks which appeared to be a ruse to divert attention away from a breach of user accounts.

DDoSSecurityWAF

WAF and DDoS Help You on the Road to GDPR Compliancy

January 19, 2017 — by Pascal Geenens0

gdpr-compliance-960x539.jpg

Data is the currency of today’s digital economy, the oil of the 21st century. Personal data is considered our economical asset generated by our identities and our behavior and we trade it for higher quality services and products. Online platforms act as intermediaries in a two-sided market collecting data from consumers and selling advertising slots to companies. In exchange for our data being collected, we get what appears to be a free service.

The growth and the market capitalization of social platform providers like Facebook and search engines such as Google demonstrate the value of personal data. Personal data also provides new ways to monetize services as news organizations are finding it difficult to charge ‘real’ money for digital news, but leverage our willingness to pay for a selection of ‘free’ news with our personal data. Every 3 out of 4 persons prefer free registration with selective access over a paid registration with full access.

DDoSSecurity

The DDoS Threat for Enterprises: Why Managed Security Matters

January 12, 2017 — by Hawley Hansen0

xo-comm-ddos-solution-960x640.jpg

As evidenced by the massive DDoS (distributed denial of service) attack in October that affected Netflix, Twitter and others, even large Internet-based companies are vulnerable to cyber-crime on a large scale. The Mirai botnet, whose source code is now available online, is credited with powering what’s been called the largest volumetric DDoS attack of its kind in history.

Mirai is the open-source DDoS toolkit that spread self-propagating malware responsible for overwhelming large servers across at least two continents. The malware simply exploited known vulnerabilities in the aging DNS (domain name server) technology that underpins the Internet’s equivalent of a phone book.

Attack Types & VectorsDDoSSecurity

Cyber Security Predictions: Looking Back at 2016, Peering Ahead to 2017

December 13, 2016 — by Carl Herberger1

cyber-security-predictions-2017-960x557.jpg

2016: What a year! Internet of Things (IoT) threats became a reality and somewhat paradoxically spawned the first 1TBs DDoS—the largest DDoS attack in history. Radware predicted these and other 2016 events in the 2015–2016 Global Application and Network Security Report. Since initiating this annual report, we have built a solid track record of successfully forecasting how the threat landscape will evolve. While some variables stay the course, the industry moves incredibly quickly, and it takes just one small catalyst to spark a new direction that nobody could have predicted.

Let’s take a look back at how our predictions fared in 2016—and then explore what Radware sees on the horizon for 2017.

DDoSHacksSecurity

Is Heat Your Thermostat’s First Priority?

December 1, 2016 — by Pascal Geenens0

Radware_Thermostat_Hack_Cartoon-960x960.png

Mirai has been popping on and off the news and is becoming a commodity resource for large scale DDoS attacks. Although most of the security community have been debating and warning about the IoT threat, there is only evidence for a very specific class of devices being involved in the Mirai attacks. As we came to know the source code and security researchers started to investigate the victimized devices, it was clear that a common class of devices stood out in the list compiled by Krebs: IP cameras, DVRs and a handful of routers. What made them better candidates than your smart toaster or your cloud connected thermostat? The fact that routers are in the list should not be surprising, those devices are per definition connected to the internet and are clearly #1 on the pwning list, which was proven again recently when 900,000 routers from DT where taken offline for service as a result of what is supposed to be an adapted version of Mirai using a remote code execution (RCE) vulnerability through the TR-069 CPE WAN management protocol.

DDoSSecurity

It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Cyber-Attack Season

November 9, 2016 — by Ben Desjardins0

retail-cyber-attacks-holidays-960x639.jpg

This year’s door buster deal might just be a DDoS attack

The luring presence of large bowls of excess Halloween candy laying around my house can only mean one thing: It’s that time of year when retailers are preparing stores (both physical and virtual) for a crush of holiday shoppers on Black Friday.

As the story goes, the term originates from an incident in the late 19th century in Philadelphia. The retailer Wanamaker’s Department Store decided on a deep discount of calico, the most common fabric used for dressmaking at the time. The throngs of shoppers that showed up for the penny-a-yard fabric sale ended up breaking through the glass windows of the front door, forcing the store to close. The closure no doubt cost Wanamaker’s dozens of dollars.

Attack Types & VectorsDDoSSecurity

Layer 7 Attack Mitigation

November 8, 2016 — by Lior Rozen0

layer-7-attack-mitigation-960x720.jpg

The DDoS world hits new records lately, with the attacks on KrebsOnSecurity.com and later on OVH and Dyn reached a bandwidth of more than 1T of traffic. While the bandwidth numbers are impressive indeed, the numbers themselves were expected. The DDoS security experts expect the previous record (about 450G bps) will be broken soon. This 1 Terabyte throughput record will probably be broken again by the end of this year, or early in the next one. The amazing part of the latest attack was the fact that this was not the reflective attack the DDoS world got used to, which leverages large internet servers amplifying the attacker requests. This time, the attack consisted of many semi-legit HTTP get requests. Such layer 7 attacks, which are aimed at the internet pipe as well as the application server behind it, are much harder to block than a layer 3 and layer 4 attack. Such attacks are also much harder to conduct.

DDoSSecurity

Rise of the Machines: How IoT broke the Internet, and the day after tomorrow

October 26, 2016 — by Zeina Zakhour0

internet-of-things-2-2-960x640.jpg

If you are reading this, you are back on Twitter, listening to your favorite music on Spotify, watching Netflix and you can finally breathe!

Yes, the massive DDoS attack targeting Dyn’s DNS service provider almost broke the Internet, and we are still in the aftermath.

Although the forensics analysis are still ongoing, we do know that this attack integrated at least one botnet of Internet of Things (IoT) devices.

This attack follows two large scale DDoS attacks launched in September that used the same methodology: infecting an ‘army’ of IoT devices to knock down victims’ services.

DDoSSecurity

How Friday’s Massive DDoS Attack on the U.S. Happened

October 23, 2016 — by Daniel Smith6

darknet-101-960x640.png

On the morning of October 21st Dyn began to suffer from a denial of service (DoS) attack that interrupted their Managed DNS network. As a result, hundreds of thousands of websites became unreachable to most of the world including Amazon’s EC2 instances. This problem intensified later in the day when the attackers launched a second round of attacks against Dyn’s DNS system. Dyn’s mitigation of the attack can be viewed on RIPE’s website where a video illustrates the BGP switches.