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Application SecurityAttack MitigationDDoS AttacksSecurity

2018 In Review: Healthcare Under Attack

December 12, 2018 — by Daniel Smith0

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Radware’s ERT and Threat Research Center monitored an immense number of events over the last year, giving us a chance to review and analyze attack patterns to gain further insight into today’s trends and changes in the attack landscape. Here are some insights into what we have observed over the last year.

Healthcare Under Attack

Over the last decade there has been a dramatic digital transformation within healthcare; more facilities are relying on electronic forms and online processes to help improve and streamline the patient experience. As a result, the medical industry has new responsibilities and priorities to ensure client data is kept secure and available–which unfortunately aren’t always kept up with.

This year, the healthcare industry dominated news with an ever-growing list of breaches and attacks. Aetna, CarePlus, Partners Healthcare, BJC Healthcare, St. Peter’s Surgery and Endoscopy Center, ATI Physical Therapy, Inogen, UnityPoint Health, Nuance Communication, LifeBridge Health, Aultman Health Foundation, Med Associates and more recently Nashville Metro Public Health, UMC Physicians, and LabCorp Diagnostics have all disclosed or settled major breaches.

[You may also like: 2019 Predictions: Will Cyber Serenity Soon Be a Thing of the Past?]

Generally speaking, the risk of falling prey to data breaches is high, due to password sharing, outdated and unpatched software, or exposed and vulnerable servers. When you look at medical facilities in particular, other risks begin to appear, like those surrounding the number of hospital employees who have full or partial access to your health records during your stay there. The possibilities for a malicious insider or abuse of access is also very high, as is the risk of third party breaches. For example, it was recently disclosed that NHS patient records may have been exposed when passwords were stolen from Embrace Learning, a training business used by healthcare workers to learn about data protection.

Profiting From Medical Data

These recent cyber-attacks targeting the healthcare industry underscore the growing threat to hospitals, medical institutions and insurance companies around the world. So, what’s driving the trend? Profit. Personal data, specifically healthcare records, are in demand and quite valuable on today’s black market, often fetching more money per record than your financial records, and are a crucial part of today’s Fullz packages sold by cyber criminals.

Not only are criminals exfiltrating patient data and selling it for a profit, but others have opted to encrypt medical records with ransomware or hold the data hostage until their extortion demand is met. Often hospitals are quick to pay an extortionist because backups are non-existent, or it may take too long to restore services. Because of this, cyber-criminals have a focus on this industry.

[You may also like: How Secure is Your Medical Data?]

Most of the attacks targeting the medical industry are ransomware attacks, often delivered via phishing campaigns. There have also been cases where ransomware and malware have been delivered via drive-by downloads and comprised third party vendors. We have also seen criminals use SQL injections to steal data from medical applications as well as flooding those networks with DDoS attacks. More recently, we have seen large scale scanning and exploitation of internet connected devices for the purpose of crypto mining, some of which have been located inside medical networks. In addition to causing outages and encrypting data, these attacks have resulted in canceling elective cases, diverting incoming patients and rescheduling surgeries.

For-profit hackers will target and launch a number of different attacks against medical networks designed to obtain and steal your personal information from vulnerable or exposed databases. They are looking for a complete or partial set of information such as name, date of birth, Social Security numbers, diagnosis or treatment information, Medicare or Medicaid identification number, medical record number, billing/claims information, health insurance information, disability code, birth or marriage certificate information, Employer Identification Number, driver’s license numbers, passport information, banking or financial account numbers, and usernames and passwords so they can resell that information for a profit.

[You may also like: Fraud on the Darknet: How to Own Over 1 Million Usernames and Passwords]

Sometimes the data obtained by the criminal is incomplete, but that data can be leveraged as a stepping stone to gather additional information. Criminals can use partial information to create a spear-phishing kit designed to gain your trust by citing a piece of personal information as bait. And they’ll move very quickly once they gain access to PHI or payment information. Criminals will normally sell the information obtained, even if incomplete, in bulk or in packages on private forums to other criminals who have the ability to complete the Fullz package or quickly cash the accounts out. Stolen data will also find its way to public auctions and marketplaces on the dark net, where sellers try to get the highest price possible for data or gain attention and notoriety for the hack.

Don’t let healthcare data slip through the cracks; be prepared.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

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What Can We Learn About Cybersecurity from the Challenger Disaster? Everything.

December 5, 2018 — by Radware1

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Understanding the potential threats that your organization faces is an essential part of risk management in modern times. It involves forecasting and evaluating all the factors that impact risk. Processes, procedures and investments can all increase, minimize or even eliminate risk.

Another factor is the human element. Often times, within an organization, a culture exists in which reams of historical data tell one story, but management believes something entirely different. This “cognitive dissonance” can lead to an overemphasis and reliance on near-term data and/or experiences and a discounting of long-term statistical analysis.

Perhaps no better example of this exists than the space shuttle Challenger disaster in 1986, which now serves as a case study in improperly managing risk. In January of that year, the Challenger disintegrated 73 seconds after launch due to the failure of a gasket (called an O-ring) in one of the rocket boosters. While the physical cause of the disaster was caused by the failure of the O-ring, the resulting Rogers Commission that investigated the accident found that NASA had failed to correctly identify “flaws in management procedures and technical design that, if corrected, might have prevented the Challenger tragedy.”

Despite strong evidence dating back to 1977 that the O-ring was a flawed design that could fail under certain conditions/temperatures, neither NASA management nor the rocket manufacturer, Morton Thiokol, responded adequately to the danger posed by the deficient joint design. Rather than redesigning the joint, they came to define the problem as an “acceptable flight risk.” Over the course of 24 preceding successful space shuttle flights, a “safety culture” was established within NASA management that downplayed the technical risks associated with flying the space shuttle despite mountains of data, and warnings about the O-ring, provided by research and development (R & D) engineers.

As American physicist Richard Feynman said regarding the disaster, “For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled.”

Truer words have never been spoken when they pertain to cybersecurity. C-suite executives need to stop evaluating and implementing cybersecurity strategies and solutions that meet minimal compliance and establish a culture of “acceptable risk” and start managing to real-world risks — risks that are supported by hard data.

Risk Management and Cybersecurity

The threat of a cyberattack on your organization is no longer a question of if, but when, and C-suite executives know it. According to C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts, 96% of executives were concerned about network vulnerabilities and security risks resulting from hybrid computing environments. Managing risk requires organizations to plan for and swiftly respond to risks and potential risks as they arise. Cybersecurity is no exception. For any organization, risks can be classified into four basic categories:

The Challenger disaster underscores all four of these risk categories. Take strategic risk as an example. Engineers from Morton Thiokol expressed concerns and presented data regarding the performance of the O-rings, both in the years prior and days leading up to the launch, and stated the launch should be delayed. NASA, under pressure to launch the already delayed mission and emboldened by the 24 preceding successful shuttle flights that led them to discount the reality of failure, pressured Morton Thiokol to supply a different recommendation. Morton Thiokol management decided to place organizational goals ahead of safety concerns that were supported by hard data. The recommendation for the launch was given, resulting in one of the most catastrophic incidents in manned space exploration. Both Morton Thiokol and NASA made strategic decisions that placed the advancements of their respective organizations over the risks that were presented.

[You may also like: The Million-Dollar Question of Cyber-Risk: Invest Now or Pay Later?]

This example of strategic risk serves as a perfect analogy for organizations implementing cybersecurity strategies and solutions. There are countless examples of high-profile cyberattacks and data breaches in which upper management was warned in advance of network vulnerabilities, yet no actions were taken to prevent an impending disaster. The infamous 2018 Panera Bread data breach is one such example. Facebook is yet another. Its platform operations manager between 2011 and 2012 warned management at the social tech giant to implement audits or enforce other mechanisms to ensure user data extracted from the social network was not misused by third-party developers and/or systems. These warnings were apparently ignored.

So why does this continually occur? The implementation of DDoS and WAF mitigation solutions often involves three key components within an organization: management, the security team/SOC and compliance. Despite reams of hard data provided by a security team that an organization is either currently vulnerable or not prepared for the newest generation of attack vectors, management will often place overemphasis on near-term security results/experiences; they feel secure in the fact that the organization has never been the victim of a successful cyberattack to date. The aforementioned Facebook story is a perfect example: They allowed history to override hard data presented by a platform manager regarding new security risks.

Underscoring this “cognitive dissonance” is the compliance team, which often seeks to evaluate DDoS mitigation solutions based solely on checkbox functionality that fulfills minimal compliance standards. Alternatively, this strategy also drives a cost-savings approach that yields short-term financial savings within an organization that often times views cybersecurity as an afterthought vis-à-vis other strategic programs, such as mobility, IoT and cloud computing.

The end result? Organizations aren’t managing real-world risks, but rather are managing “yesterday’s” risks, thereby leaving themselves vulnerable to new attack vectors, IoT botnet vulnerabilities, cybercriminals and other threats that didn’t exist weeks or even days ago.

The True Cost of a Cyberattack

To understand just how detrimental this can be to the long-term success of an organization requires grasping the true cost of a cyberattack. Sadly, these data points are often as poorly understood, or dismissed, as the aforementioned statistics regarding vulnerability. The cost of a cyberattack can be mapped by the four risk categories:

  • Strategic Risk: Cyberattacks, on average, cost more than one million USD/EUR, according to 40% of executives. Five percent estimated this cost to be more than 25 million USD/EUR.
  • Reputation Risk: Customer attrition rates can increase by as much as 30% following a cyberattack. Moreover, organizations that lose over four percent of their customers following a data breach suffer an average total cost of $5.1 million. In addition, 41% of executives reported that customers have taken legal action against their companies following a data breach. The Yahoo and Equifax data breach lawsuits are two high-profile examples.
  • Product Risk: The IP Commission estimated that counterfeit goods, pirated software and stolen trade secrets cost the U.S. economy $600 billion annually.
  • Governance Risk: “Hidden” costs associated with a data breach include increased insurance premiums, lower credit ratings and devaluation of trade names. Equifax was devalued by $4 billion by Wall Street following the announcement of its data breach.

[You may also like: Understanding the Real Cost of a Cyber-Attack and Building a Cyber-Resilient Business]

Secure the Customer Experience, Manage Risk

It’s only by identifying the new risks that an organization faces each and every day and having a plan in place to minimize them that enables its executives to build a foundation upon which their company will succeed. In the case of the space shuttle program, mounds of data that clearly demonstrated an unacceptable flight risk were pushed aside by the need to meet operational goals. What lessons can be learned from that fateful day in January of 1986 and applied to cybersecurity? To start, the disaster highlights the five key steps of managing risks.

In the case of cybersecurity, this means that the executive leadership must weigh the opinions of its network security team, compliance team and upper management and use data to identify vulnerabilities and the requirements to successfully mitigate them. In the digital age, cybersecurity must be viewed as an ongoing strategic initiative and cannot be delegated solely to compliance. Leadership must fully weigh the potential cost of a cyberattack/data breach on the organization versus the resources required to implement the right security strategies and solutions. Lastly, when properly understood, risk can actually be turned into a competitive advantage. In the case of cybersecurity, it can be used as a competitive differentiator with consumers that demand fast network performance, responsive applications and a secure customer experience. This enables companies to target and retain customers by supplying a forward-looking security solution that seamlessly protects users today and into the future.

So how are executives expected to accomplish this while facing new security threats, tight budgets, a shortfall in cybersecurity professionals and the need to safeguard increasingly diversified infrastructures? The key is creating a secure climate for the business and its customers.

To create this climate, research shows that executives must be willing to accept new technologies, be openminded to new ideologies and embrace change, according to C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts. Executives committed to staying on top of this ever-evolving threat must break down the silos that exist in the organization to assess the dimensions of the risks across the enterprise and address these exposures holistically. Next is balancing the aforementioned investment versus risk equation. All executives will face tough choices when deciding where to invest resources to propel their companies forward. C-suite executives must leverage the aforementioned data points and carefully evaluate the risks associated with security vulnerabilities and the costs of implementing effective security solutions to avoid becoming the next high-profile data breach.

According to the same report, four in 10 respondents identified increasing infrastructure complexity, digital transformation plans, integration of artificial intelligence and migration to the cloud as events that put pressure on security planning and budget allocation.

The stakes are high. Security threats can seriously impact a company’s brand reputation, resulting in customer loss, reduced operational productivity and lawsuits. C-suite executives must heed the lessons of the space shuttle Challenger disaster: Stop evaluating and implementing cybersecurity strategies and solutions that meet minimal compliance and start managing to real-world risks by trusting data, pushing aside near-term experiences/“gut instincts” and understanding the true cost of a cyberattack. Those executives who are willing to embrace technology and change and prioritize cybersecurity will be the ones to win the trust and loyalty of the 21st-century consumer.

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

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Application SecurityAttack MitigationDDoS AttacksSecurityWAF

Protecting Applications in a Serverless Architecture

November 8, 2018 — by Ben Zilberman0

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Serverless architectures are revolutionizing the way organizations procure and use enterprise technology. Until recently, information security architecture was relatively simple; you built a fortress around a server containing sensitive data, and deployed security solutions to control the flow of users accessing and leaving that server.

But how do you secure a server-less environment?

The Basics of Serverless Architecture

Serverless architecture is an emerging trend in cloud-hosted environments and refers to applications that significantly depend on third-party services (known as Backend-as-a-Service or “BaaS”) or on custom code that’s run in ephemeral containers (known as Function-as-a-Service or “FaaS”). And it is significantly more cost effective than buying or renting servers.

The rapid adoption of micro-efficiency-based pricing models (a.k.a PPU, or pay-per-use) pushes public cloud providers to introduce a business model that meets this requirement. Serverless computing helps providers optimize that model by dynamically managing the allocation of machine resources. As a result, organizations pay based on the actual amount of resources their applications consume, rather than ponying up for pre-purchased units of workload capacity (which is usually higher than what they utilize in reality).

What’s more, going serverless also frees developers and operators from the burdens of provisioning the cloud workload and infrastructure. There is no need to deploy operating systems and patch them, no need to install and configure web servers, and no need to set up or tune auto-scaling policies and systems.

[You may also like: Application Delivery and Application Security Should be Combined]

Security Implications of Going Serverless

The new serverless model coerces a complete change in architecture – nano services of a lot of software ‘particles.’ The operational unit is set of function containers that execute REST API functions, which are invoked upon a relevant client-side event. These function instances are created, run and then terminated. During their run time, they receive, modify and send information that organizations want to monitor and protect. The protection should be dynamic and swift:

  • There is no perimeter or OS to secure
  • Agents and a persistent footprint become redundant.
  • To optimize the business model, the solution must be scalable and ephemeral automation is the key to success

If we break down our application into components that run in a serverless model, the server that runs the APIs uses different layers of code to parse the requests, essentially enlarging the attack surface. However, this isn’t an enterprise problem anymore; it’s the cloud provider’s. Unfortunately, even they sometimes lag in patch management and hardening workloads. Will your DevOps read all of the cloud provider documentation in details?  Most likely, they’ll go with generic permissions. If you want to do something right, you better do it yourself.

Serverless computing doesn’t eradicate all traditional security concerns. Application-level vulnerabilities can still be exploited—with attacks carried out by human hackers or bots—whether they are inherent in the FaaS infrastructure or in the developer function code.

When using a FaaS model, the lack of local persistent storage encourages data transfer between the function and the different persistent storage services (e.g., S3 and DynamoDB by AWS) instead. Additionally, each function eventually processes data received from storage, the client application or from a different function. Every time it’s moved, it becomes vulnerable to leakage or tampering.

In such an environment, it is impossible to track all potential and actual security events. One can’t follow each function’s operation to prevent it from accessing wrong resources. Visibility and forensics must be automated and perform real time contextual analysis. But the question is not whether to use serverless or not because it is more in/secure. Rather, the question is how to do it when your organization goes there.

[You may also like: Web Application Security in a Digitally Connected World]

A New Approach

Simply put, going serverless requires a completely different security approach—one that is dynamic, elastic, and real-time. The security components must be able to move around at the same pace as the applications, functions and data they protect.

First thing’s first: To help avoid code exploitation (which is what attacks boil down to), use encryption and monitor the function’s activity and data access so it has, by default, minimum permissions. Abnormal function behavior, such as expected access to data or non-reasonable traffic flow, must be analyzed.

Next, consider additional measures, like a web application firewall (WAF), to secure your APIs. While an API gateway can manage authentication and enforce JSON and XML validity checks, not all API gateways support schema and structure validation, nor do they provide full coverage of OWASP top 10 vulnerabilities like a WAF does. WAFs apply dozens of protection measures on both inbound and outbound traffic, which is parsed to detect protocol manipulations. Client-side inputs are validated and thousands of rules are applied to detect various injections attacks, XSS attacks, remote file inclusion, direct object references and many more.

[You may also like: Taking Stock of Application-Layer Security Threats]

In addition to detecting known attacks, for the purposes of zero-day attack protection and comprehensive application security, a high-end WAF allows strict policy enforcement where each function can have its own parameters white listed—the recommended approach when deploying a function processing sensitive data or mission-critical business logic.

And—this is critical—continue to mitigate for DDoS attacks. Going serverless does not eliminate the potential for falling susceptible to these attacks, which have changed dramatically over the past few years. Make no mistake: With the growing online availability of attack tools and services, the pool of possible attacks is larger than ever.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

Download Now

Attack MitigationDDoS AttacksSecurity

The Delta Airlines Security Breach: A Case Study in How to Respond to a Data Breach

October 24, 2018 — by Anna Convery-Pelletier1

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Recent data breaches against Panera Bread, Delta Airlines, Sears, Saks, and Lord & Taylor highlight a lot: the need for improved web application and internet security processes, better accountability, and why cybersecurity is critical to securing the loyalty of an organization’s most valued customers.

But perhaps most importantly, it highlights how an organization should react if they do suffer a data breach and the significance of a response plan. If there was ever an example of the importance of honesty and transparency, communicating effectively with consumers after your organization has been breached is a critical one.

Take Delta Airlines as an example. In April 2018, the company announced it was informed that some of its customer’s credit card information had been compromised during online chat support provided by a third party software company called [24]7.ai. In response, Delta launched a custom webpage providing a complete overview of the breach (including a timeline and FAQ section), executed a customer communication plan that included education and mitigation best practices, and worked with partners and law enforcement to identify how/when the breach occurred.

Delta’s handling of the breach underscores some of the key best practices that organizations should act upon once they identify a data breach has occurred.

  • Communication is key to both internal (employees, partners, suppliers, etc.) and external (customers) audiences, including direct mailing to clients, an official media release/statement, and if necessary, interviews in the appropriate press
  • Be open and sincere and admit what happened and accept responsibility
  • Provide details and explain how the breach occurred
  • Mitigate. Provide solutions for impacted users, and if possible, prepare a special offer for the affected audience
  • Educate by providing best practices on how to prevent similar issues in the future
  • Invite open dialogue by involving clients, industry experts, and even the general public

All too often, consumers discover that their personal information was compromised long after the breach occurred when suspicious activity on financial accounts, e-commerce sites, etc., is noticed. This is often the result of one of two reasons. The first is because an organization doesn’t realize its sensitive data has been breached. According to various sources, it can take a company nearly 200 days to realize there’s been a data breach.[1]

The second and far too common reason is that organizations seeking to avoid the negative connotation of being a data breach victim avoid directly or immediately announcing that a breach has occurred. However, as research suggests, the consequences of such surreptitious communication tactics can be far worse than the direct impacts of a data breach.

According to the report Consumer Sentiments: Cybersecurity, Personal Data and The Impact on Customer Loyalty, the vast majority of consumers must be convinced that the security issue has been addressed and any damage has been rectified before continuing to do business with the brand.[2]

[You might also like: Consumer Sentiments About Cybersecurity and What It Means for Your Organization]

The impact on businesses is twofold. Whereby companies were once reticent about speaking publically about cybersecurity because it would cause consumers to question their business’s fragility, organizations must now embrace and communicate their ability to safeguard customer data. Forward-thinking organizations have the opportunity to use security and due diligence as a competitive differentiator to build trust and loyalty with customers in the face of an increasingly insecure world.

Per the aforementioned points, companies must clearly communicate that a breach has occurred, those likely impacted and planned remediation actions to address the issue. Organizations that don’t admit to compromised consumer records until long after the breach took place to suffer the greatest wrath from consumers.

In addition to increased customer attrition rates and lost revenue, that wrath increasingly includes lawsuits. Forty-one percent of executives report that customers have taken legal action against their companies following a data breach. Given the string of high-profile data breaches in recent years, consumers are becoming increasingly empowered by regional government regulations that are forcing the hands of organizations to act accordingly following a data breach. The best example of this is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that went into effect throughout the European Union in May 2018. Broadly speaking, the GDPR provides individuals with a right to an effective judicial remedy and/or compensation and liability, especially if the holder of the PII has not acted accordingly to the regulations.

Ultimately, an organization’s ability to successfully respond to a data breach is linked to its ability to view cybersecurity, not as an afterthought, but rather a strategic initiative that mitigates business risk across all mission-critical departments within the organization, not just IT. When an organization is breached, it’s not just impacting the CIO. It affects the CFO, CMO and the COO, in addition to the CEO.

In an increasingly insecure world where customer loyalty to a particular brand is tied directly to that brand’s ability to safeguard the customer’s data, the entire C-suite must be held responsible when a breach occurs to reaffirm the trust and loyalty of consumers and to mitigate the broader, more cataclysmic impact that could result if they don’t.

Read “Consumer Sentiments: Cybersecurity, Personal Data and The Impact on Customer Loyalty” to learn more.

Download Now

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New Threat Landscape Gives Birth to New Way of Handling Cyber Security

May 1, 2018 — by Carl Herberger2

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With the growing online availability of attack tools and services, the pool of possible attacks is larger than ever. Let’s face it, getting ready for the next cyber-attack is the new normal! This ‘readiness’ is a new organizational tax on nearly every employed individual throughout the world.

Security

Hey there Security Professional…..How do YOU mitigate attacks?

July 19, 2017 — by Carl Herberger5

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The last several months have been historic by any measure. U.S. banks and financial institutions around the world have come under cyber-attacks at a high rate. We’ve seen everything from DDoS attacks to waves of ransomware. 

So, why was this? Is it because they didn’t have enough resources or serious professionals dedicated to program management?  Not likely. The true answer is a bit more uncomfortable, but worthy of exploration.

Security

2017 Considerations before Buying an Attack Mitigation System

May 11, 2017 — by Carl Herberger2

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Managing the security of critical information has proven a challenge for businesses and organizations of all sizes. Even companies that invest in the latest security infrastructure and tools soon discover that these technology-based “solutions” are short-lived. From antivirus software to firewalls and intrusion detection and prevention systems, these solutions are, in fact, merely the most effective strategies at the time of implementation. In other words, as soon as businesses build or strengthen a protective barrier, the “bad guys” find another way to get in. Attackers are constantly changing their tactics and strategies to make their attacks and scams as damaging as possible.  The good news is that it appears that attacks and subsequent defenses are breaking down in categories which can be measured systematically. The following areas are of a particular concern as we look towards 2017-2018 planning for attacks:

Cloud SecurityDDoSSecurity

Network-as-a-Sensor: A New Approach to the DDoS Problem

February 17, 2016 — by Ron Meyran1

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Mike Geller from Cisco’s CTO office and Ehud Doron of Radware’s CTO office presented at Cisco Live Berlin 2016 the revolutionary concept of Network-as-a-Sensor to fight DDoS attacks.

There are two approaches to detect against DDoS attacks: on-premise (also sometimes called in-line) and Cloud (out of path). When a DDoS protection solution is deployed on-premise, organizations benefit from an immediate and automatic attack detection and DDoS mitigation solution. Within seconds from the start of an attack, the online services are well protected and the attack is mitigated.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Best Practices for Hybrid Cloud/On-Premise Attack Mitigation

February 1, 2016 — by Ben Zilberman0

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The cybersecurity industry keeps us all on our toes trying to follow up with solutions and breakthrough technologies – not only in advanced security capabilities, but also with state of the art methods of management and integration with other network security elements.

You want your security elements to play together in a well synchronized manner. You wouldn’t want to have to intervene to frequently make manual adjustments, would you?

DDoSSecurity

The “State” of DDoS Mitigation Products and Vendors

December 3, 2015 — by Dennis Usle0

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DDoS attacks have become a mainstream topic frequently in the news with coverage in major news outlets around the globe from ABC News to ZDNet and most in between.  Attack campaigns by groups like Anonymous, DD4BC, Lizard Squad and Lulzsec have become dinner conversations in many homes and online businesses have been struggling to keep pace with the evolving threat landscape.