main

SecurityService Provider

Out of the Shadows, Into the Network

April 9, 2019 — by Radware1

darkness-960x540.jpg

Network security is a priority for every carrier worldwide. Investments in human resources and technology solutions to combat attacks are a significant part of carriers’ network operating budgets.

The goal is to protect their networks by staying a few steps ahead of hackers. Currently, carriers may be confident that their network security solution is detecting and mitigating DDoS attacks.

All the reports generated by the solution show the number and severity of attacks as well as how they were thwarted. Unfortunately, we know it’s a false sense of well-being because dirty traffic in the form of sophisticated application attacks is getting through security filters. No major outages or data breaches have been attributed to application attacks yet, so why should carriers care?

Maintaining a Sunny Reputation

The impact of application attacks on carriers and their customers takes many forms:

  • Service degradation
  • Network outages
  • Data exposure
  • Consumption of bandwidth resources
  • Consumption of system resources

[You may also like: How Cyberattacks Directly Impact Your Brand]

A large segment of carriers’ high-value customers have zero tolerance for service interruption. There is a direct correlation between service outages and user churn.

Application attacks put carriers’ reputations at risk. For customers, a small slowdown in services may not be a big deal initially. But as the number and severity of application attacks increase, clogged pipes and slow services are not going to be acceptable. Carriers sell services based on speed and reliability. Bad press about service outages and data compromises has long-lasting negative effects. Then add the compounding power of social networking to quickly spread the word about service issues, and you have a recipe for reputation disaster.

[You may also like: Securing the Customer Experience for 5G and IoT]

Always Under Attack

It’s safe for carriers to assume that their networks are always under attack. DDoS attack volume is escalating as hackers develop new and more technologically sophisticated ways to target carriers and their customers In 2018, attack campaigns were primarily composed of multiple attacks vectors, according to the Radware 2018–2019 Global Application & Network Security Report.

The report finds that “a bigger picture is likely to emerge about the need to deploy security solutions that not only adapt to changing attack vectors to mitigate evolving threats but also maintain service availability at the same time.”

[You may also like: Here’s How Carriers Can Differentiate Their 5G Offerings]

Attack vectors include:

  • SYN Flood
  • UDP Flood
  • DNS Flood
  • HTTP Application Flood
  • SSL Flood
  • Burst Attacks
  • Bot Attacks

Attackers prefer to keep a target busy by launching one or a few attacks at a time rather than firing the entire arsenal all at once. Carriers may be successful at blocking four or five attack vectors, but it only takes one failure for the damage to be done.

2018 Mobile Carrier Ebook

Read “Creating a Secure Climate for your Customers” today.

Download Now

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Can SNMP (Still) Be Used to Detect DDoS Attacks?

August 9, 2018 — by Pascal Geenens20

snmp-burst-attacks-ddos-960x576.jpg

SNMP is an Internet Standard protocol for collecting information about managed devices on IP networks. SNMP became a vital component in many networks for monitoring the health and resource utilization of devices and connections. For a long time, SNMP was the tool to monitor bandwidth and interface utilization. In this capacity, it is used to detect line saturation events caused by volumetric DDoS attacks on an organization’s internet connection. SNMP is adequate as a sensor for threshold-based volumetric attack detection and allows automated redirection of internet traffic through cloud scrubbing centers when under attack. By automating the process of detection, mitigation time can considerably be reduced and volumetric attacks mitigated through on-demand cloud DDoS services. SNMP provides minimal impact on the device’s configuration and works with pretty much any network device and vendor. As such, it is very convenient and gained popularity for deployments of automatic diversion.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

42% of Organizations Experienced Burst Attacks; The Rest Were Unaware

February 27, 2018 — by Ron Meyran3

burst-attacks-960x679.jpg

One of the prominent trends in 2017 was an increase in short-burst attacks, which have become more complex, more frequent and longer in duration. Burst tactics are typically used against gaming websites and service providers due to their sensitivity to service availability as well as their inability to sustain such attack maneuvers.