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DDoS

How to Choose a Cloud DDoS Scrubbing Service

August 21, 2019 — by Eyal Arazi0

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Buying a cloud-based security solution is more than just buying a technology. Whereas when you buy a physical product, you care mostly about its immediate features and capabilities, a cloud-based service is more than just lines on a spec sheet; rather, it is a combination of multiple elements, all of which must work in tandem, in order to guarantee performance.

Cloud Service = Technology + Network + Support

There are three primary elements that determine the quality of a cloud security service: technology, network, and support.

Technology is crucial for the underlying security and protection capabilities. The network is required for a solid foundation on which the technology runs on, and the operation & support component is required to bring them together and keep them working.

[You may also like: Security Considerations for Cloud Hosted Services]

Take any one out, and the other two legs won’t be enough for the service to stand on.

This is particularly true when looking for a cloud-based DDoS scrubbing solution. Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks have distinct features that make them different than other types of cyber-attacks. Therefore, there are specific requirements for cloud-based DDoS protection service that cover the full gamut of technology, network, and support that are particular to DDoS protection.

Technology

As I explained earlier, technology is just one facet of what makes-up a cloud security service. However, it is the building block on which everything else is built.

The quality of the underlying technology is the most important factor in determining the quality of protection. It is the technology that determines how quickly an attack will be detected; it is the quality of the technology that determines whether it can tell the difference between a traffic spike in legitimate traffic, and a DDoS attack; and it is the technology that determines whether it can adapt to attack patterns in time to keep your application online or not.

[You may also like: Why You Still Need That DDoS Appliance]

In order to make sure that your protection is up to speed, there are a few key core features you want to make sure that your cloud service provides:

  • Behavioral detection: It is often difficult to tell the difference between a legitimate traffic in customer traffic – say, during peak shopping periods – and a surge caused by a DDoS attack. Rate-based detection won’t be able to tell the difference, resulting in false positives. Therefore, behavioral detection, which looks not just at traffic rates, but also at non-rate behavioral parameters is a must-have capability.
  • Automatic signature creation: Attackers are relying more and more on multi-vector and ‘hit-and-run’ burst attacks, which frequently switch between different attack methods. Any defense mechanism based on manual configurations will fail because it won’t be able to keep up with changed. Only defenses which provide automatic, real-time signature creation can keep up with such attacks, in order to tailor defenses to the specific characteristics of the attack.
  • SSL DDoS protection: As more and more internet traffic becomes encrypted – over 85% according to the latest estimates – protection against encrypted DDoS floods becomes ever more important. Attackers can leverage DDoS attacks in order to launch potent DDoS attacks which can quickly overwhelm server resources. Therefore, protection capabilities against SSL-based DDoS attacks is key.
  • Application-layer protection: As more and more services migrate online, application-layer (L7) DDoS attacks are increasingly used in order to take them down. Many traditional DDoS mitigation services look only at network-layer (L3/4) protocols, but up-to-date protection must including application-layer protection, as well.
  • Zero-day protection: Finally, attackers are constantly finding new ways of bypassing traditional security mechanisms and hitting organizations with attack methods never seen before. Even by making small changes to attack signatures hackers can craft attacks that are not recognized by manual signatures. That’s why including zero-day protection features, which can adapt to new attack types, is an absolute must-have.

[You may also like: Modern Analytics and End-to-End Visibility]

Network

The next building block is the network. Whereas the technology stops the attack itself, it is the network that scales-out the service and deploys it on a global scale. Here, too, there are specific requirements that are uniquely important in the case of DDoS scrubbing networks:

  • Massive capacity: When it comes to protection against volumetric DDoS attacks, size matters. DDoS attack volumes have been steadily increasing over the past decade, with each year reaching new peaks. That is why having large-scale, massive capacity at your disposal in an absolute requirement to stop attacks.
  • Dedicated capacity: It’s not enough, however, to just have a lot of capacity. It is also crucial that this capacity be dedicated to DDoS scrubbing. Many security providers rely on their CDN capacity, which is already being widely utilized, for DDoS mitigation, as well. Therefore, it is much more prudent to focus on networks whose capacity is dedicated to DDoS scrubbing and segregated from other services such as CDN, WAF, or load-balancing.
  • Global footprint: Fast response and low latency are crucial components in service performance. A critical component in latency, however, is distance between the customer and the host. Therefore, in order to minimize latency, it is important for the scrubbing center to be as close as possible to the customer, which can only be achieve with a globally distributed network with a large footprint.

Support

The final piece of the ‘puzzle’ of providing a high-quality cloud security network is the human element; that is, maintenance, operation and support.

Beyond the cold figures of technical specifications, and the bits-and-bytes of network capacity, it is the service element that ties together the technology and network, and makes sure that they keep working in tandem.

[You may also like: 5 Key Considerations in Choosing a DDoS Mitigation Network]

Here, too, there are a few key elements to look at when considering a cloud security network:

  • Global Team: Maintaining global operations of a cloud security service requires a team large enough to ensure 24x7x365 operations. Moreover, sophisticated security teams use a ‘follow-the-sun’ model, with team member distributed strategically around the world, to make sure that experts are always available, regardless of time or location. Only teams that reach a certain size – and companies that reach a certain scale – can guarantee this.
  • Team Expertise: Apart from sheer numbers of team member, it is also their expertise that matter. Cyber security is a discipline, and DDoS protection, in particular, is a specialization. Only a team with a distinguished, long track record in  protecting specifically against DDoS attacks can ensure that you have the staff, skills, and experience required to be fully protected.
  • SLA: The final qualification are the service guarantees provided by your cloud security vendor. Many service providers make extensive guarantees, but fall woefully short when it comes to backing them up. The Service Level Agreement (SLA) is your guarantee that your service provider is willing to put their money where their mouth is. A high-quality SLA must provide individual measurable metrics for attack detection, diversion (if required), alerting, mitigation, and uptime. Falling short of those should call into question your vendors ability to deliver on their promises.

A high-quality cloud security service is more than the sum of its parts. It is the technology, network, and service all working in tandem – and hitting on all cylinders – in order to provide superior protection. Falling short on any one element can potentially jeopardize quality of the protection delivered to customers. Use the points outlined above to ask yourself whether your cloud security vendor has all the right pieces to provide quality protection, and if they don’t – perhaps it is time for you to consider alternatives.

Read “2019 C-Suite Perspectives: From Defense to Offense, Executives Turn Information Security into a Competitive Advantage” to learn more.

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DDoS Attacks

Healthcare is in Cybercriminals’ Crosshairs

August 6, 2019 — by Mark Taylor0

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The healthcare industry is a prime target of hackers. According to Radware’s 2018-2019 Global Application and Network Security Report, healthcare was the second-most attacked industry after the government sector in 2018. In fact, about 39 percent of healthcare organizations were hit daily or weekly by hackers and only 6 percent said they’d never experienced a cyber attack.

Increased digitization in healthcare is a contributor to the industry’s enlarged attack surface. And it’s accelerated by a number of factors: the broad adoption of Electronic Health Records Systems (EHRS), integration of IoT technology in medical devices (software-based medical equipment like MRIs, EKGs, infusion pumps), and a migration to cloud services.

Case in point: 96% of non-federal acute care hospitals have an EHRS. This is up from 8% in 2008.  

Accenture estimates that the loss of data and related failures will cost healthcare companies nearly $6 trillion in damages in 2020, compared to $3 trillion in 2017. Cyber crime can have a devastating financial impact on the healthcare sector in the next four to five years.

The Vulnerabilities

According to the aforementioned Radware report, healthcare organizations saw a significant increase in malware or bot attacks, with socially engineered threats and DDoS steadily growing, as well. While overall ransomware attacks have decreased, hackers continue to hit the healthcare industry the hardest with these attacks. And they will continue to refine ransomware attacks and likely hijack IoT devices to hold tech hostage.

[You may also like: How Cyberattacks Directly Impact Your Brand]

Indeed, the increasing use of medical IoT devices makes healthcare organizations more vulnerable to DDoS attacks; attackers use infected IoT devices in botnets to launch coordinated attacks.

Additionally, cryptomining is on the rise, with 44 percent of organizations experiencing a cryptomining or ransomware attack. Another 14 percent experienced both. What’s worse is that these health providers don’t feel prepared for these attacks. The report found healthcare “is still intimidated by ransomware.”

The Office of Civil Rights (OCR) has warned about the dangers of DDoS attacks on healthcare organizations; in one incident, a DDoS attack overloaded a hospital network and computers, disrupting operations and causing hundreds of thousands of dollars in losses and damages.

[You may also like: 2018 In Review: Healthcare Under Attack]

Why Healthcare?

The healthcare industry is targeted for a variety of reasons. For one thing, money. By 2026, healthcare spending will consume 20% of the GDP, making the industry an attractive financial target for cyber criminals. And per Radware’s report, the value of medical records on the darknet is higher than that of passwords and credit cards.

And as my colleague Daniel Smith previously wrote, “not only are criminals exfiltrating patient data and selling it for a profit, but others have opted to encrypt medical records with ransomware or hold the data hostage until their extortion demand is met. Often hospitals are quick to pay an extortionist because backups are non-existent, or it may take too long to restore services.”

[You may also like: How Secure is Your Medical Data?]

Regardless of motivation, one thing is certain: Ransomware and DDoS attacks pose a dangerous threat to patients and those dealing with health issues. Many ailments are increasingly treated with cloud-based monitoring services, IoT-embedded devices and self or automated administration of prescription medicines. Cyber attacks could establish a foothold in the delivery of health services and put people’s lives and well-being at risk.

Recommendations

Securing digital assets can no longer be delegated solely to the IT department. Security planning needs to be infused into new product and service offerings, security, development plans and new business initiatives–not just for enterprises, but for hospitals and healthcare providers alike.

To prevent or mitigate DDoS attacks, US-Computer Emergency Readiness Team (US-CERT) recommends that organizations consider the following measures:

  • Continuously monitoring and scanning for vulnerable and comprised IoT devices on their networks and following proper remediation actions
  • Creating and implementing password management policies and procedures for devices and their users; ensuring all default passwords are changed to strong passwords
  • Installing and maintaining anti-virus software and security patches; updating IoT devices with security patches as soon as patches become available is critical.
  • Installing a firewall and configuring it to restrict traffic coming into and leaving the network and IT systems
  • Segmenting networks where appropriate and applying security controls for access to network segments
  • Disabling universal plug and play on routers unless absolutely necessary

Read “The Trust Factor: Cybersecurity’s Role in Sustaining Business Momentum” to learn more.

Download Now

DDoS

Why You Still Need That DDoS Appliance

July 2, 2019 — by Eyal Arazi0

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More and more organizations are adopting cloud-based DDoS defenses and substituting them for their old, premise-based DDoS appliances. Nonetheless, there are still a number of reasons why you might want to keep that DDoS appliance around.

The Rise of Cloud Protection

More and more organizations are deploying cloud-based DDoS mitigation services. Indeed, Frost & Sullivan estimated that by 2021, cloud-based mitigation service will account for 70% of spending on DDoS protection.

The reasons for adopting cloud-based protections are numerous. First and foremost, is capacity. As DDoS attacks keep getting bigger, high-volume DDoS attacks capable of saturating the inbound communication pipe are becoming more common. For that reason, having large-scale cloud-based scrubbing capacity to absorb such attacks is indispensable.

[You may also like: Does Size Matter? Capacity Considerations When Selecting a DDoS Mitigation Service]

Moreover, cloud-based DDoS defenses are purchased on a pay-as-you-go SaaS subscription model, so organizations can quickly scale up or down, and don’t need to allocate large amounts of capital expenditure (CAPEX) far in advance. In addition, cloud services usually provide easier management and lower overhead than on-prem equipment, and don’t require dedicated staff to manage.

It is no surprise, then, that more and more organizations are looking to the cloud for DDoS protection.

The benefits of the cloud notwithstanding, there are still several key reasons why organizations would still want to maintain their hardware appliances, alongside cloud-based services.

[You may also like: Managing Security Risks in the Cloud]

Two-Way Traffic Visibility

Cloud-based services, by definition, only provide visibility into ingress – or inbound – traffic into the organization. They inspect traffic as it flows through to the origin, and scrub-out malicious traffic it identifies. While this is perfectly fine for most types of DDoS attacks, there are certain types of DDoS attacks that require visibility into both traffic channels in order to be detected and mitigated.

Examples of attacks that require visibility into egress traffic in order to detect include:

  • Out-of-State Protocol Attacks: These attacks exploit weaknesses in protocol communication process (such as TCP’s three-way handshake) to create “out-of-state” connection requests which exhaust server resources. Although some attacks of this type – such as SYN floods – can be mitigated solely with visibility into ingress traffic only, other types of out-of-state DDoS attacks – such as an ACK flood – require visibility into the outbound channel, as well. Visibility into the egress channel will be required to detect that these ACK responses are not associated with a legitimate SYN/ACK response, and can therefore be blocked.

[You may also like: 5 Key Considerations in Choosing a DDoS Mitigation Network]

  • Reflection/Amplification Attacks: These attacks take advantage of the asymmetric nature of some protocols or request types in order to launch attacks that will exhaust server resources or saturate the outbound communication channel. An example of such an attack is a large file download attack. In this case, visibility into the egress channel is required to detect the spike in outbound traffic flowing from the network.
  • Scanning attacks: Such attacks frequently bare the hallmarks of a DDoS attack, since they flood the network with large numbers of erroneous connection requests. Such scans frequently generate large numbers of error replies, which can clog-up the outbound channel. Again, visibility into the outbound traffic is required to identify the error response rate relative to legitimate inbound traffic, so that defenses can conclude that an attack is taking place.

Application-layer Protection

Similarly, relying on a premise-based appliance has certain advantages for application-layer (L7) DDoS protection and SSL handling.

Certain types of application-layer(L7) DDoS attacks exploit known protocol weaknesses in order to generate large numbers of forged application requests that exhaust server resources. Examples of such attacks are low-and-slow attacks or application-layer SYN floods, which draw-out TCP and HTTP connections to continuously consume server resources.

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Again, although some such attacks can be mitigated by cloud scrubbing service, mitigating some types of attacks requires application state-awareness that cloud-based mitigation services usually do not possess.

Using a premise-based DDoS mitigation appliance with application-layer DDoS protection capabilities allows organizations to have this.

SSL DDoS Protection

Moreover, SSL encryption is adding another layer of complexity, as the encryption layers makes it difficult to inspect traffic contents for malicious traffic. In order to inspect traffic contents, cloud-based services must decrypt all traffic, inspect it, scrub-out bad traffic, and re-encrypt it, before forwarding it to the customer origin.

[You may also like: 5 Must-Have DDoS Protection Technologies]

As a result, most cloud-based DDoS mitigation services either provide no protection at all for SSL-based traffic, or use full-proxy SSL offloading which require that customers upload their certificates to the service provider’s cloud infrastructure.

However, performing full SSL offloading in the cloud is frequently a burdensome process which adds latency to customer communications and violates user privacy. That is why many organizations are hesitant – or don’t have the capability – of sharing their SSL keys with third party cloud service providers.

[You may also like: How to (Securely) Share Certificates with Your Cloud Security Provider]

Again, deploying a premise-based appliance allows organizations to protect against SSL DDoS floods while keeping SSL certificates in-house.

Layered Protection

Finally, using a premise-based hardware appliance in conjunction with a cloud service allows for layered protection in case attack traffic somehow gets through the cloud protection.

Using a premise-based appliances allows the organization control directly over device configuration and management. Although many organizations prefer that this be handled by cloud-based managed services, some organizations (and some security managers) prefer to have this deeper level of control.

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This control also allows security policy granularity, so that security policies can be fine-tuned exactly to the needs of the organizations, and cover attack vectors that the cloud-layer does not – or cannot – cover.

Finally, this allows for security failover, so that if malicious traffic somehow gets through the cloud mitigation, the appliance will handle it.

The Best Practice: A Hybrid Approach

Ultimately, it is up to each organization to decide what is the optimal solution for them, and what type of deployment model (appliance, pure cloud, or hybrid) is best for them.

Nonetheless, more and more enterprises are adopting a hybrid approach, combining the best of both worlds between the security granularity of hardware appliances, and the capacity and resilience of cloud services.

In particular, an increasingly popular option is an always-on hybrid solution, which combines always-on cloud service together with a hardware DDoS mitigation appliance. Combining these defenses allows for constant, uninterrupted protection against volumetric protection, while also protecting against application-layer and SSL DDoS attacks, while reducing exposure of SSL keys and improving handling of SSL traffic.

Read “The Trust Factor: Cybersecurity’s Role in Sustaining Business Momentum” to learn more.

Download Now

Security

Cities Are Under Attack. Here’s Why.

June 25, 2019 — by Mark Taylor0

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Greenville, North Carolina. Imperial County, California. Stuart, Florida. Cincinnati, Ohio. These are just a handful of cities and counties across the U.S. that have experienced crippling cyber attacks in recent months.

In 2019, local governments across the country have become the focus of attacks and face a growing threat of cyber attacks and escalating ransom demands. Indeed, ransomware is a pandemic in the United States, and hackers are increasingly going after larger targets instead of focusing on home computers, like most did five years ago.

[You may also like: Cities Paying Ransom: What Does It Mean for Taxpayers?]

The Vulnerabilities

Generally speaking, cities and municipalities are less prepared than companies to mitigate cyber attacks, due to limited resources and difficulty competing for cybersecurity talent. They are also increasingly reliant on technology to deliver city services. This, combined with aging computer systems, enlarges their attack surfaces.

And attackers are also getting more savvy. Per CSO Online, “There’s a constantly growing threat of exploitation either through investment from state-sponsored actors to the commoditization of very sophisticated attack techniques that are easy to use for inexperienced hackers. Ransomware isn’t new. It’s just how it’s been packaged up and how it’s being leveraged operationally by the hacker community.”

Why Cities and Municipalities?

Whether attacks on cities are increasing or merely just coming more to light now, it’s clear that they’re attractive targets for attackers.

This rationale is reinforced in Radware’s 2018-2019 Global Application & Network Security Report. According to the report, 52% of cyberattacks were motivated by financial or ransom purposes, far outpacing any other attack motivation. What’s more, government (cities and municipalities) are key targets, with 45% of government organizations being attacked on a daily or weekly basis.

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Simply put, the combination of constrained resources, data- and information-rich environments, countered by increasing automated attacks and attack types make cities and municipalities a high-value target for cyber criminals.

There’s no denying that in cities and municipalities, the pressure is on. Securing the constituent experience against cyberattacks is no longer just the responsibility of the IT department. Agencies need to implement security strategies–in every process and program–as if their very survival depends on them.

It only takes one data breach to compromise and expose constituent personal information or hobble critical services such as emergency response, public safety, air travel and more.

Recommendations

While it’s impossible to eliminate every risk or neutralize every threat, there are practical and minimal effort controls every city and municipality should consider. And tools alone don’t provide complete protection; a truly secure experience involves expert resources (threat intelligence), flexible deployment (cloud service), and agility or ease of use (fully managed).

[You may also like: Here’s How You Can Better Mitigate a Cyberattack]

When choosing the right security partner, which is critical for cities and municipalities, consider the following:

  • Evaluate protection for all web applications. Look for always-on and fully-managed services to protect both on-premise and cloud-based applications.
  • Evaluate risk from new DDoS attack types. Many organizations rely on their ISP and firewalls to detect and mitigate DDoS attacks. But DDoS attacks are growing and targeting applications, and application attacks are rarely detected by ISPs. 
  • Evaluate firewall DDoS protection. Attacks can fill state tables and bring down your firewall. 

The attack trends will persist in the foreseeable future, and all signs point to financial motivation gaining, thereby pushing attackers to try to profit from malicious malware. Of particular concern is the possibility of hackers investing their profits to leverage machine-learning capabilities to find ways to access and exploit resources in networks and applications.

Be prepared.

Download “Hackers Almanac” to learn more.

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BotnetsDDoS

Botnets: DDoS and Beyond

June 20, 2019 — by Daniel Smith0

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Traditionally, DDoS is an avenue of profit for botherders. But today’s botnets have evolved to include several attack vectors other than DDoS that are more profitable. And just as any business-oriented person would do, attackers follow the money.

As a result, botherders are targeting enterprise and network software, since residential devices have become over saturated. The days of simple credentials-based attacks are long behind us. Attackers are now looking for enterprise devices that will help expand their offerings and assists in developing additional avenues of profit.

A few years ago, when IoT botnets became all the rage, they were mainly targeting residential devices with simple credential attacks (something the DDoS industry does not prevent from happening; instead we take the position of mitigating attacks coming from infected residential devices).

[You may also like: IoT Botnets on the Rise]

From Personal to Enterprise

But now that attackers are targeting enterprise devices, the industry must reevaluate the growing threat behind today’s botnets.

We now have to focus on not only protecting the network from external attacks but also the devices and servers found in a typical enterprise network from being infected by botnet malware and leveraged to launch attacks.

In a blog posted on MIT’s Technology Review titled, Inside the business model for botnets, C.G.J. Putman and colleagues from the University of Twente in the Netherlands detail the economics of a botnet. The article sheds some light on the absence of DDoS attacks and the growth of other vectors of attack generated from a botnet.

In their report, the team states that DDoS attacks from a botnet with 30,000 infected devices could generate around $26,000 a month. While that might seem like a lot, it’s actually a drop in the bucket compared to other attack vectors that can be produced from a botnet.

For example, C.G.J. Putman and Associates reported that a spamming botnet with 10,000 infected devices can generate $300,000 a month. The most profitable? Click fraud, which can generate over $20 million per month in profit.

[You may also like: Ad Fraud 101: How Cybercriminals Profit from Clicks]

To put that in perspective, AppleJ4ck and P1st from Lizard Squad made close to $600,000 over 2 years’ operating a stresser service called vDoS.

So let me ask this: If you are a botherder risking your freedom for profit, are you going to construct a botnet strictly for DDoS attacks or will you construct a botnet with more architecturally diverse devices to support additional vectors of profit?

Exactly. Botherders will continue to maximize their efforts and profitability by targeting enterprise devices.

Read the “IoT Attack Handbook – A Field Guide to Understanding IoT Attacks from the Mirai Botnet and its Modern Variants” to learn more.

Download Now

Security

Executives Are Turning Infosec into a Competitive Advantage

June 18, 2019 — by Anna Convery-Pelletier0

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Companies are more connected to their customers now than ever before.  After spending billions to digitally transform themselves, organizations have exponentially increased the number of touchpoints as well as the frequency of communication they have with their customer base. 

Thanks to digital transformation, organizations are more agile, flexible, efficient, and customer-centric. However, with greater access to customers comes an equal measure of increased vulnerability. We have all seen the havoc that a data breach can wreak upon a brand; hackers are the modern-day David to the Goliaths of the Fortune 1000 world. As a result, we have experienced a fundamental shift in management philosophy around the role that information security plays across organizations. The savviest leaders have shifted from a defensive to offensive position and are turning information security into a competitive market advantage.

Each year, Radware surveys C-Suite executives to measure leadership sentiment around information security, its costs and business impacts.  This year, we studied the views and insights from 263 senior leaders at organizations primarily with revenue in excess of 1 billion USD/EUR/GBP around the world. Respondents represented 30% financial services, 21% retail/hospitality, 21% telecom/service provider, 7% manufacturing/distribution, 7% computer products/services, 6% business services/consulting, and 9% other.

This year’s report shines a spotlight on increased sophistication of management philosophy for information security and security strategy. While responsibility for cybersecurity continues to be spearheaded by the CIO and CISO, it is also being shared throughout the entire C-Suite.

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In fact, 72% of executives responding to our survey claimed that it’s a topic discussed in every board meeting. 82% of responding CEOs reported high levels of knowledge around information security, as did 72% of non-technical C-Suite titles – an all-time high! Security issues now influence brand reputation, brand trust, and consumer trust, which forces organizations to infuse information security into core business functions such as customer experience, marketing and business operations.

All with good reason. The average cost of a cyberattack is now roughly $4.6M, and the number of organizations that claim attacks cost them more than $10M has doubled from 2018 to 2019.

Customers are quite aware of the onslaught of data breaches that have affected nearly every industry, from banking to online dating, throughout the past ten years. Even though many governments have passed many laws to protect consumers against misuse of their data, such as GDPR, CASL, HIPPA, Personally Identifiable Information (PII), etc., companies still can’t keep up with the regulations. 

[You may also like: The Costs of Cyberattacks Are Real]

Case in point: 74% of European executives report they have experienced a data breach in the past 12 months, compared to 53% in America and 44% in APAC. Half (52%) of executives in Europe have experienced a self-reported incident under GDPR in the past year.  

Consumer confidence is at an all-time low. These same customers want to understand what companies have done to secure their products and services and they are willing to take their business elsewhere if that brand promise is broken. Customers are increasingly taking action following a breach. 

[You may also like: How Do Marketers Add Security into Their Messaging?]

Reputation management is a critical component of organizational management. Savvy leaders recognize the connection between information security and reputation management and subsequently adopted information security as a market advantage.

So How Do Companies Start to Earn Back Trust?

These leaders recognize that security must become part of the brand promise. Our research shows that 75% of executives claim security is a key part of their product marketing messages. 50% of companies surveyed offer dedicated security products and services to their customers. Additionally, 41% offer security features as add-ons within their products and services, and another 7% are considering building security services into their products.

Balancing Security Concerns with Deployment of Private and Public Clouds

Digital transformation drove a mass migration into public and private cloud environments.  Organizations were wooed by the promise of flexibility, streamlined business operations, improved efficiency, lower operational costs, and greater business agility. Rightfully so, as cloud environments have largely fulfilled their promises.

[You may also like: Excessive Permissions are Your #1 Cloud Threat]

However, along with these incredible benefits comes a far greater risk than most organizations anticipated. While 54% of respondents report improving information security is one of their top three reasons for initiating digital transformation processes, 73% of executives indicate they have had unauthorized access to their public cloud assets.  What is more alarming is how these unauthorized access incidents have occurred.

The technical sophistication of the modern business world has eroded the trust between brands and their customers, opening the door for a new conversation around security. 

Leading organizations have already begun to weave security into the very fabric of their culture – and it’s evidenced by going to market with secure marketing messages (as Apple’s new ad campaigns demonstrate), sharing responsibility for information security across the entire leadership team, creating privacy-centric business policies and processes, making information security and customer data-privacy part of an organization’s core values, etc.  The biggest challenges organizations still face is in how best to execute it, but that is a topic for another blog…

To learn more about the insights and perspectives on information security from the C-Suite, please download the report.

Read “2019 C-Suite Perspectives: From Defense to Offense, Executives Turn Information Security into a Competitive Advantage” to learn more.

Download Now

Botnets

What You Need to Know About Botnets

June 12, 2019 — by Radware0

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Botnets comprised of vulnerable IoT devices, combined with widely available DDoS-as-a-Service tools and anonymous payment mechanisms, have pushed denial-of-service attacks to record-breaking volumes.

A single attack can result in downtime, lost business and significant financial damages. Understanding the current tactics, techniques and procedures used by today’s cyber criminals is key to defending your network.

Watch this latest video from Radware’s Hacker’s Almanac to learn more about Botnets and how you can help protect your business from this type of sabotage.

Download “Hackers Almanac” to learn more.

Download Now

Application Security

4 Emerging Challenges in Securing Modern Applications

May 1, 2019 — by Radware0

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Modern applications are difficult to secure. Whether they are web or mobile, custom developed or SaaS-based, applications are now scattered across different platforms and frameworks. To accelerate service development and business operations, applications rely on third-party resources that they interact with via APIs, well-orchestrated by state-of-the-art automation and synchronization tools. As a result, the attack surface becomes greater as there are more blind spots – higher exposure to risk.

Applications, as well as APIs, must be protected against an expanding variety of attack methods and sources and must be able to make educated decisions in real time to mitigate automated attacks. Moreover, applications constantly change, and security policies must adopt just as fast. Otherwise, businesses face increased manual labor and operational costs, in addition to a weaker security posture. 

The WAF Ten Commandments

The OWASP Top 10 list serves as an industry benchmark for the application security community, and provides a starting point for ensuring protection from the most common and virulent threats, application misconfigurations that can lead to vulnerabilities, and detection tactics and mitigations. It also defines the basic capabilities required from a Web Application Firewall in order to protect against common attacks targeting web applications like injections, cross-site scripting, CSRF, session hijacking, etc. There are numerous ways to exploit these vulnerabilities, and WAFs must be tested for security effectiveness.

However, vulnerability protection is just the basics. Advanced threats force application security solutions to do more.

Challenge 1: Bot Management

52% of internet traffic is bot generated, half of which is attributed to “bad” bots. Unfortunately, 79% of organizations can’t make a clear distinction between good and bad bots. The impact is felt across all business arms as bad bots take over user accounts and payment information, scrape confidential data, hold up inventory and skew marketing metrics, thus leading to wrong decisions. Sophisticated bots mimic human behavior and easily bypass CAPTCHA or other challenges. Distributed bots render IP-based and even device fingerprinting based protection ineffective. Defenders must level up the game.

[You may also like: CISOs, Know Your Enemy: An Industry-Wise Look At Major Bot Threats]

Challenge 2: Securing APIs

Machine-to-machine communications, integrated IoTs, event driven functions and many other use cases leverage APIs as the glue for agility. Many applications gather information and data from services with which they interact via APIs. Threats to API vulnerabilities include injections, protocol attacks, parameter manipulations, invalidated redirects and bot attacks. Businesses tend to grant access to sensitive data, without inspecting nor protect APIs to detect cyberattacks. Don’t be one of them.

[You may also like: How to Prevent Real-Time API Abuse]

Challenge 3: Denial of Service

Different forms of application-layer DoS attacks are still very effective at bringing application services down. This includes HTTP/S floods, low and slow attacks (Slowloris, LOIC, Torshammer), dynamic IP attacks, buffer overflow, Brute Force attacks and more. Driven by IoT botnets, application-layer attacks have become the preferred DDoS attack vector. Even the greatest application protection is worthless if the service itself can be knocked down.

[You may also like: DDoS Protection Requires Looking Both Ways]

Challenge 4: Continuous Security

For modern DevOps, agility is valued at the expense of security. Development and roll-out methodologies, such as continuous delivery, mean applications are continuously modified. It is extremely difficult to maintain a valid security policy to safeguard sensitive data in dynamic conditions without creating a high number of false positives. This task has gone way beyond humans, as the error rate and additional costs they impose are enormous. Organizations need machine-learning based solutions that map application resources, analyze possible threats, create and optimize security policies in real time.

[You may also like: Are Your DevOps Your Biggest Security Risks?]

Protecting All Applications

It’s critical that your solution protects applications on all platforms, against all attacks, through all the channels and at all times. Here’s how:

  • Application security solutions must encompass web and mobile apps, as well as APIs.
  • Bot Management solutions need to overcome the most sophisticated bot attacks.
  • Mitigating DDoS attacks is an essential and integrated part of application security solutions.
  • A future-proof solution must protect containerized applications, serverless functions, and integrate with automation, provisioning and orchestration tools.
  • To keep up with continuous application delivery, security protections must adapt in real time.
  • A fully managed service should be considered to remove complexity and minimize resources.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

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SecurityService Provider

Bot Management: A Business Opportunity for Service Providers

April 30, 2019 — by Radware0

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Over half of all internet traffic is generated by bots — some legitimate, some malicious. These “bad” bots are often deployed with various capabilities to achieve their nefarious objectives, which can include account takeover, scraping data, denying available inventory and launching denial-of-service attacks with the intent of stealing data or causing service disruptions. Sophisticated, large-scale attacks often go undetected by conventional mitigation systems and strategies.

Bots represent a clear and present danger to service providers. The inability to accurately distinguish malicious bots from legitimate traffic/users can leave a service provider exposed and at risk to suffer customer loss, lost profits and irreparable brand damage.

In an age where securing the digital experience is a competitive differentiator, telecommunication companies, management services organizations (MSOs) and internet service providers (ISPs) must transform their infrastructures into service-aware architectures that deliver scalability and security to customers, all the while differentiating themselves and creating revenue by selling security services.

[You may also like: Bot Managers Are a Cash-Back Program For Your Company]

Bot Traffic in the Service Provider Network

Bot attacks often go undetected by conventional mitigation systems and strategies because they have evolved from basic scripts into large-scale distributed bots with human-like interaction capabilities. Bots have undergone a transformation, or evolution, over the years. Generally speaking, they can be classified into four categories, or levels, based on their degree of sophistication.

The four categories of malicious bots.

In addition to the aforementioned direct impact that these bots have, there is the added cost associated with increased traffic loads imposed on service providers’ networks. In an age of increased competition and the growth of multimedia consumption, it is critical that service providers accurately eliminate “bad” bots from their networks.

[You may also like: The Big, Bad Bot Problem]

Staying ahead of the evolving threat landscape requires more sophisticated, advanced capabilities to accurately detect and mitigate these threats. These include combining behavioral modeling, collective bot intelligence and capabilities such as device fingerprinting and intent-based deep behavioral analysis (IDBA) for precise bot management across all channels.

Protecting Core Application from Bot Access

Bots attack web and mobile applications as well as application programming interfaces (APIs). Bot-based application DoS attacks degrade web applications by exhausting system resources, third-party APIs, inventory databases and other critical resources.

[You may also like: How to Prevent Real-Time API Abuse]

IDBA is now one of the critical capabilities needed to mitigate advanced bots. It performs behavioral analysis at a higher level of abstraction of “intent,” unlike commonly used, shallow “interaction”-based behavior analysis. IDBA is a critical next-generation capability to mitigate account takeovers executed by more advanced Generation 3 and 4 bots, as it leverages the latest developments in deep learning and behavioral analysis to decode the true intention of bots. IDBA goes beyond analyzing mouse movements and keystrokes to detect human-like bots, so “bad” bots can be parsed from legitimate traffic to ensure a seamless online experience for consumers.

API Exposure

APIs are increasingly used to exchange data or to integrate with partners, and attackers understand this. It is essential to accurately distinguish between “good” API calls and “bad” API calls for online businesses. Attackers reverse engineer mobile and web applications to hijack API calls and program bots to invade these APIs. By doing so, they can take over accounts, scrape critical data and perform application DDoS attacks by deluging API servers with unwanted requests.

Account Takeover

This category encompasses ways in which bots are programmed to use false identities to obtain access to data or goods. Their methods for account takeover can vary. They can hijack existing accounts by cracking a password via Brute Force attacks or by using known credentials that have been leaked via credential stuffing. Lastly, they can be programmed to create new accounts to carry out their nefarious intentions.

[You may also like: Will We Ever See the End of Account Theft?]

As its name suggests, this category encompasses an array of attacks focused on cracking credentials, tokens or verification codes/numbers with the goal of creating or cracking account access to data or products. Examples include account creation, token cracking and credential cracking/stuffing. Nearly all of these attacks primarily target login pages.

The impact of account takeover? Fraudulent transactions, abuse of reward programs, and damage to brand reputation.

Advertising Traffic Fraud

Malicious bots create false impressions and generate illegitimate clicks on publishing sites and their mobile apps. In addition, website metrics, such as visits and conversions, are vulnerable to skewing. Bots pollute metrics, disrupt funnel analysis and inhibit key performance indicator (KPI) tracking. Automated traffic on your website also affects product metrics, campaign data and traffic analytics. Skewed analytics are a major hindrance to marketers who need reliable data for their decision-making processes.

[You may also like: Ad Fraud 101: How Cybercriminals Profit from Clicks]

The Business Opportunity for Service Providers

Regardless of the type of attack, service providers are typically held to high expectations when it comes to keeping customer data secure and maintaining service availability. With each attack, service providers risk customer loss, brand reputation, lost profits and at the worst, costly governmental involvement and the resulting investigations and lawsuits.

These same business expectations apply to service providers’ customers, many of whom require security services. Although large organizations can attempt to develop their own in-house bot management solutions, these companies do not necessarily have the time, money and expertise to build and maintain them.

Building an adaptive bot mitigation solution can take years of specialized development. Financially, it makes sense to minimize capex and purchase a cloud-based bot mitigation solution on a subscription basis. This can help companies realize the value of bot management without making a large upfront investment.

Lastly, this allows service providers to protect their core infrastructure and their own customers from bot-based cyberattacks and provides the opportunity to extend any bot management solution as part of a cloud security services offering to generate a new revenue stream.

2018 Mobile Carrier Ebook

Read “Creating a Secure Climate for your Customers” today.

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DDoS Protection Requires Looking Both Ways

March 26, 2019 — by Eyal Arazi0

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Service availability is a key component of the user experience. Customers expect services to be constantly available and fast-responding, and any downtime can result in disappointed users, abandoned shopping carts, and lost customers.

Consequently, DDoS attacks are increasing in complexity, size and duration. Radware’s 2018 Global Application and Network Security Report found that over the course of a year, sophisticated DDoS attacks, such as burst attacks, increased by 15%, HTTPS floods grew by 20%, and over 64% of customers were hit by application-layer (L7) DDoS attacks.

Some Attacks are a Two-Way Street

As DDoS attacks become more complex, organizations require more elaborate protections to mitigate such attacks. However, in order to guarantee complete protection, many types of attacks – particularly the more sophisticated ones – require visibility into both inbound and outbound channels.

Some examples of such attacks include:

Out of State Protocol Attacks: Some DDoS attacks exploit weaknesses in protocol communication processes, such as TCP’s three-way handshake sequence, to create ‘out-of-state’ connection requests, thereby drawing-out connection requests in order to exhaust server resources. While some attacks of this type, such as a SYN flood, can be stopped by examining the inbound channel only, others require visibility into the outbound channel, as well.

An example of this is an ACK flood, whereby attackers continuously send forged TCP ACK packets towards the victim host. The target host then tries to associate the ACK reply to an existing TCP connection, and if none such exists, it will drop the packet. However, this process consumes server resources, and large numbers of such requests can deplete system resources. In order to correctly identify and mitigate such attacks, defenses need visibility to both inbound SYN and outbound SYN/ACK replies, so that they can verify whether the ACK packet is associated with any legitimate connection request.

[You may also like: An Overview of the TCP Optimization Process]

Reflection/Amplification Attacks: Such attacks exploit asymmetric responses between the connection requests and replies of certain protocols or applications. Again, some types of such attacks require visibility into both the inbound and outbound traffic channels.

An example of such attack is a large-file outbound pipe saturation attack. In such attacks, the attackers identify a very large file on the target network, and send a connection request to fetch it. The connection request itself can be only a few bytes in size, but the ensuing reply could be extremely large. Large amounts of such requests can clog-up the outbound pipe.

Another example are memcached amplification attacks. Although such attacks are most frequently used to overwhelm a third-party target via reflection, they can also be used to saturate the outbound channel of the targeted network.

[You may also like: 2018 In Review: Memcache and Drupalgeddon]

Scanning Attacks: Large-scale network scanning attempts are not just a security risk, but also frequently bear the hallmark of a DDoS attack, flooding the network with malicious traffic. Such scan attempts are based on sending large numbers of connection requests to host ports, and seeing which ports answer back (thereby indicating that they are open). However, this also leads to high volumes of error responses by closed ports. Mitigation of such attacks requires visibility into return traffic in order to identify the error response rate relative to actual traffic, in order for defenses to conclude that an attack is taking place.

Server Cracking: Similar to scanning attacks, server cracking attacks involve sending large amounts of requests in order to brute-force system passwords. Similarly, this leads to a high error reply rate, which requires visibility into both the inbound and outbound channels in order to identify the attack.

Stateful Application-Layer DDoS Attacks: Certain types of application-layer (L7) DDoS attacks exploit known protocol weaknesses or order to create large amounts of spoofed requests which exhaust server resources. Mitigating such attacks requires state-aware bi-directional visibility in order to identify attack patterns, so that the relevant attack signature can be applied to block it. Examples of such attacks are low-and-slow and application-layer (L7) SYN floods, which draw-out HTTP and TCP connections in order to continuously consume server resources.

[You may also like: Layer 7 Attack Mitigation]

Two-Way Attacks Require Bi-Directional Defenses

As online service availability becomes ever-more important, hackers are coming up with more sophisticated attacks than ever in order to overwhelm defenses. Many such attack vectors – frequently the more sophisticated and potent ones – either target or take advantages of the outbound communication channel.

Therefore, in order for organizations to fully protect themselves, they must deploy protections that allow bi-directional inspection of traffic in order to identify and neutralize such threats.

Read “The Trust Factor: Cybersecurity’s Role in Sustaining Business Momentum” to learn more.

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