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Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

The Growth of DDoS-as-a-Service: Stresser Services

September 28, 2017 — by Daniel Smith5

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The growth of DDoS-as-a-Service has resulted in a wide array of powerful and affordable DDoS services available to the public. Since the beginning of 2016, Radware’s ERT Research division has been monitoring a number of services available on both the clear and the darknet. These off-the-shelf attack services have been used to launch DDoS attacks on a number of industries including ISPs, media, financial service companies and online gaming. These services are commoditizing the art of hacking by making it possible for novices with no experience to launch large scale attacks.

Security

Radware’s Top Blogs of 2016

January 5, 2017 — by Radware0

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Happy Near Year! Another year has come and gone in the blink of an eye. 2016 brought with it several interesting threats and attacks in the cyber-security space, among them the largest DDoS attack in history, the enslavement of Internet of Things (IoT) devices by botnets, the rise of cyber ransom and more – all of which we have dutifully reported here on the Radware Blog.

You, our readers, are what drive our dedication and commitment to industry insight. So what did you think of 2016? We’ve compiled a list of the top 5 blogs you most loved from last year.

Attack Types & VectorsDDoSSecuritySSL

What are the implications of the crackdown on popular DDoSaaS site VDoS?

September 16, 2016 — by Carl Herberger1

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The alleged creators of the popular VDoS website were arrested by Israeli authorities at the behest of the FBI on Thursday (September 8th). The 4-year-old site provided attack-for-hire services that helped its customers orchestrate more than 150,000 so-called distributed denial-of-service attacks (DDoS attacks) designed to take websites offline, and earned approximately $300,000 per year.

It is simply frightening that a 14-year-old child can build, maintain and earn hundreds of thousands of dollars a year and amass an estimated $1M after four years of operating a DDoS service before being stopped at the age of 18.