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Mobile SecurityService Provider

Don’t Be A “Dumb” Carrier

February 12, 2019 — by Mike O'Malley0

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By next year, it is estimated that there will be 20.4 billion IoT devices, with businesses accounting for roughly 7.6 billion of them. While these devices are the next wireless innovation to improve productivity in an ever-connected world, they also represent nearly 8 billion opportunities for breaches or attacks.

In fact, 97% of companies believe IoT devices could wreak havoc on their organizations, and with good reason. Security flaws can leave millions of devices vulnerable, creating pathways for cyber criminals to exfiltrate data—or worse. For example, a July 2018 report disclosed that nearly 500 million IoT devices were susceptible to cyberattacks at businesses worldwide because of a decade old web exploit.

A New Attack Environment

In other words, just because these devices are new and innovative doesn’t mean your security is, too. To further complicate matters, 5G networks will begin to roll out in 2020, creating a new atmosphere for mobile network attacks. Hackers will be able to exploit IoT devices and leverage the speed, low latency and high capacity of 5G networks to launch unprecedented volumes of sophisticated attacks, ranging from standard IoT attacks to burst attacks, and even smartphone infections and mobile operating system malware.

Scary stuff.

[You may also like: IoT, 5G Networks and Cybersecurity: A New Atmosphere for Mobile Network Attacks]

So, who is responsible for securing these billions of devices to ensure businesses and consumers alike are protected?  Well, right now, nobody. And there’s no clear agreement on what entity is—or should be—held accountable. According to Radware’s 2017-2018 Global Application & Network Security Report, 34% believe the device manufacturer is responsible, 11% believe service providers are, 21% think it falls to the private consumer, and 35% believe business organizations should be liable.

Ownership Is Opportunity

Indeed, no one group is raising its hand to claim ownership of IoT device security. But if service providers want to protect their networks and customers, they should jump at the chance to take the lead here. While service providers technically don’t own the emerging security issues, it is ultimately the operators who are best positioned to deal with and mitigate attack traffic. While many may view this as an operational cost, it is, in actuality, a business opportunity.

In fact, the Japanese government is so concerned about a large scale IoT attack disrupting the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, they just passed a law empowering the government to intentionally identify and hack vulnerable IoT devices.  And who is the government asking to secure the list of devices they find vulnerable? Consumers? Businesses? Manufacturers?  No, No, and NO.  They are asking service providers to secure these devices from attacks.

[You may also like: IoT, 5G Networks and Cybersecurity: Safeguarding 5G Networks with Automation and AI]

Think about it: Every device connected to a network is another potential security weakness. And as we’ve written about previously, IoT devices are especially vulnerable because of manufacturers’ priority to maintain low costs, rather than spending more on additional security features. If mobile service providers create a secure environment that satisfies the protection of customer data and devices, they can establish a competitive advantage and reap financial rewards.

From Opportunity to Rewards

This translates to the potential for capturing new revenue streams. If your mobile network is more secure than your competitors’, it stands to reason that their customer attrition becomes your win. And mobile IoT businesses will pay an additional service premium for the knowledge that their IoT devices won’t be compromised and can maintain 100% availability.

[You may also like: The Rise of 5G Networks]

What’s more, service providers need to be mindful of history repeating itself. After providers lost the war with Apple and Google to control apps (and their associated revenue), they earned the unfortunate reputation of being “dumb pipes.” Conversely, Apple and Google were heralded for capturing all the value of the explosion of mobile data apps. Apple now sits with twice the valuation as AT&T and Verizon, COMBINED.  Now, as we are on the precipice of a similar explosion of IoT apps that enterprises will buy, the question again arises over whether service providers will just sell “dumb pipes” or whether they will get involved in the value chain.

A word to the wise: Don’t be a “dumb” carrier. Be smart.  Secure the customer experience and reap the benefits.

2018 Mobile Carrier Ebook

Read “Creating a Secure Climate for your Customers” today.

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Attack Types & VectorsBotnets

Attackers Are Leveraging Automation

January 31, 2019 — by Radware0

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Cybercriminals are weaponizing automation and machine learning to create increasingly evasive attack vectors, and the internet of things (IoT) has proven to be the catalyst driving this trend. IoT is the birthplace of many of the new types of automated bots and malware.

At the forefront are botnets, which are increasingly sophisticated, lethal and highly automated digitized armies running amok on corporate networks. For example, hackers now leverage botnets to conduct early exploitation and network reconnaissance prior to unleashing an attack.

The Mirai botnet, which was made famous by its use in the 2016 attack on DNS provider Dyn, along with its subsequent variants, embodies many of these characteristics. It leverages a network-scanning and attack architecture capable of identifying “competing” malware and removing it from the IoT device to block remote administrative control. In addition, it leverages the infamous Water Torture attack to generate randomized domain names on a DNS infrastructure. Follow-up variants use automation to allow the malware to craft malicious queries in real time.

[You may also like: A Quick History of IoT Botnets]

Modern-day malware is an equally sophisticated multi-vector cyberattack weapon designed to elude detection using an array of evasion tools and camouflage techniques. Hackers now leverage machine learning to create custom malware that defeats anti-malware defenses. One example is Generative Adversarial Network algorithms
that can bypass black-box machine-learning models. In another example, a cybersecurity company adapted Elon Musk’s OpenAI framework to create forms of malware that mitigation solutions couldn’t detect.

Automation for Detection and Mitigation

So how does a network security team improve its ability to deal with these increasingly multifarious cyberattacks? Fight fire with fire. Automated cybersecurity solutions provide the data-processing muscle to mitigate these advanced threats.

Executives clearly understand this and are ready to take advantage of automation. According to Radware’s C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts report, the vast majority of executives (71%) report shifting more of their network security budget into technologies that employ machine learning and automation. The need to protect increasingly heterogeneous infrastructures, a shortage in cybersecurity talent and increasingly dangerous
cyberthreats were indicated as the primary drivers of this fiscal shift.

In addition, the trust factor is increasing. Four in 10 executives trust automated systems more than humans to protect their organization against cyberattacks.

[You may also like: Looking Past the Hype to Discover the Real Potential of AI]

Traditional DDoS solutions use rate limiting and manual signature creation to mitigate attacks. Rate limiting can be effective but can also result in a high number of false positives. As a result, manual signatures are then used to block offending traffic to reduce the number of false positives. Moreover, manual signatures take time to create because identifying offending traffic is only possible AFTER the attack starts. With machine-learning botnets now breaching defenses in less than 20 seconds, this hands-on strategy does not suffice.

Automation and, more specifically, machine learning overcome the drawbacks of manual signature creation and rate-limiting protection by automatically creating signatures and adapting protections to changing attack vectors. Machine learning leverages advanced mathematical models and algorithms to look at baseline network parameters, assess network behavior, automatically create attack signatures and adapt security configurations and/or policies to mitigate attacks. Machine learning transitions an organization’s DDoS protection strategy from manual, ratio- and rate-based protection to behavioral-based detection and mitigation.

The Final Step: Self-Learning

A market-leading DDoS protection solution combines machine-learning capabilities with negative and positive security protection models to mitigate automated attack vectors, such as the aforementioned DNS Water Torture attacks made notorious by Mirai. By employing machine learning and ingress-only positive protection models, this sort of an attack vector is eliminated, regardless of whether the protected DNS infrastructure is an authoritative or a recursive DNS.

The final step of automated cybersecurity is automated self-learning. DDoS mitigation solutions should leverage a deep neural network (DNN) that conducts post-analysis of all the generated data, isolates known attack information and feeds those data points back into the machine learning algorithms. DNNs require massive amounts of storage and computing power and can be prohibitively expensive to house and manage within a privately hosted data center.

[You may also like: Are Application Testing Tools Still Relevant with Self Learning WAFs?]

As a result, ideally a DNN is housed and maintained by your organization’s DDoS mitigation vendor, which leverages its network of cloud-based scrubbing centers (and the massive volumes of threat intelligence data that it collects) to process this information via big data analytics and automatically feed it back into your organization’s DDoS mitigation solution via a real-time threat intelligence feed.This makes the input of thousands of malicious IPs and new attack signatures into an automated process that no SOC team could ever hope to accomplish manually.

The result is a DDoS mitigation system that automatically collects data from multiple sources and leverages machine learning to conduct zero-day characterization. Attack signatures and security policies are automatically updated and not reliant on a SOC engineer who is free to conduct higher-level analysis, system management and threat analysis.

Automation is the future of cybersecurity. As cybercriminals become more savvy and increasingly rely on automation to achieve their mischievous goals, automation and machine learning will become the cornerstone of cybersecurity solutions to effectively combat the onslaught from the next generation of attacks. It will allow organizations to improve the ability to scale network security teams, minimize human errors and safeguard digital assets to ensure brand reputation and the customer experience.

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

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Attack MitigationSecurity

Looking Past the Hype to Discover the Real Potential of AI

January 22, 2019 — by Pascal Geenens0

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How can organizations cut through the hype around AI to understand the most important issues they should be addressing? How can they incorporate AI into their security strategies now to take advantage of the technology’s ability to detect and mitigate attacks that incorporate the same capabilities? Pascal Geenens, Radware’s EMEA security evangelist, weighs in.

What is the threat landscape, and how disruptive is it likely to be?

In the near term, cybercriminals will mainly use AI to automate attacks and improve evasion capabilities against detection systems and to increase the scale and reach of the threats. Expect to see AI used to automatically breach defenses and generate more sophisticated phishing attacks from information scraped from publicly accessible web sources. The scale of attacks will quickly escalate to volumes that we have never experienced before.

On the evasive side, machine-learning systems such as generative adversarial networks (GANs) can automatically create malware that is harder to detect and block. This technique has already been demonstrated by researchers. The MalGAN research project proposed a GAN to create evasive malware that goes undetected by all modern anti-malware systems, even the systems based on deep learning.

[You may also like: How Cyberattacks Directly Impact Your Brand: New Radware Report]

In the first phase, AI will be used to improve current attack tools to make them more harmful and difficult to detect.

Machine learning and automation can be leveraged to find new vulnerabilities, especially in large public clouds where cloud native systems are being built based on widely reused open-source software frameworks. Platforms running this software will become primary targets for vulnerability scanning.

Given that open-source code is readable and accessible by both criminals and security researchers, this platform may become the next battlefield with an associated “arms race” to  discover, abuse or fix vulnerabilities.  Deep learning will provide an advantage  in discovering new vulnerabilities based on code. While open source is an easier target, even closed-source software will not escape automated attacks based on the learning process of the attack program.

Looking further ahead, I can imagine large cybercrime organizations or nation-states using AI. Where machine learning was previously used mainly for automating attacks, now AI systems such as genetic algorithms and reinforced learning will be used to automatically generate new attack vectors and breach all kinds of systems, whether cloud, IoT or ICS. Then, combine this capability with the automation of the first stage. We will face a fully automated, continuously evolving attack ecosystem that will hack, crack and improve itself over time with no limits in scale or endurance.

[You may also like: DevOps: Application Automation? The Inescapable Path]

Cybercriminals could move from being the actual hackers, performing the real attack and penetrating defenses, to becoming maintainers and developers of the automated AI hacking machine. Machines will do the hacking; humans will focus on improving efficiency of the machines.

What vulnerabilities will make targets more attractive to criminals once AI is incorporated in their tools? How will it affect corporate espionage?

Ultimately every organization will be digitally transformed and become a primary target for automated attacks. Which targets are chosen will be solely dependent on the objective of the attack. For ransom and extortion, every organization is a good candidate target. For corporate espionage, it depends how much organizations are willing to pay to secure intellectual property in certain areas. It’s fair to say that, by definition, every organization can — and, at some point, will — be a target.

What about politically motivated cyberattacks initiated at the national level?

We’ve already witnessed attacks meant to influence public  opinion and the political landscape. Such attacks are likely to grow and become more difficult to identify early in the process and to protect against once attackers leverage deep learning and broader AI technologies. Attackers have already produced automatically generated messages and discussions, as well as “deep fake” videos that are created by AI algorithms.

[You may also like: Hacking Democracy: Vulnerable Voting Infrastructure and the Future of Election Security]

Influencing what topics are important and  manipulating opinions are becoming new weapons of choice for nation-states. Social platform providers need to take a stance and remain as clean as possible by dedicating much of their own AI-assisted automated detection systems to stay ahead of cybercriminals and others that create and improve AI-assisted automated systems for fake content creation.

From a defense perspective, what types of AI-based products will be used to combat more technologically savvy cybercriminals?

There’s a saying in our industry that “you cannot stop what you cannot detect.” Cybersecurity has become automated for the sake of the detection of new, increasingly complex and continuously adapting threats, and deep learning is improving that capability. AI, in the broad sense of the term, will probably come into play in the near-term future rather than immediately. The current state of AI in the defense discussion is confined to the traditional machine learning, and while deep learning shows a lot of promise, it is still too challenged to be used for automated mitigation. More intelligent and self-adaptive systems, the domain of AI, are still further out when it comes to automating our cyberdefenses.

Will the use of AI-based attacks by cybercriminals drive adoption of AI-based mitigation solutions by enterprises, organizations and institutions?

Yes, but not necessarily at the same pace. There are three factors to consider — the attack vector, its speed and its evasion technique:

  1. For example, using AI for phishing does not affect the victim in terms of change in attack vector, but it does increase the scale and number of targets, compelling every organization to improve its This protection might include AI-based systems, but not necessarily.
  2. On the other hand, as attacks get more automated, organizations will have to automate their security to ensure that they keep on top of the rising number and accelerated speed of attacks.
  3. When new evasion techniques based on AI are leveraged by cybercriminals, it will ultimately lead to the use of better detection systems that are based on AI.

Read “The Trust Factor: Cybersecurity’s Role in Sustaining Business Momentum” to learn more.

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Botnets

Bot or Not? Distinguishing Between the Good, the Bad & the Ugly

January 8, 2019 — by Anna Convery-Pelletier2

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Bots touch virtually every part of our digital lives. They help populate our news feeds, tell us the weather, provide stock quotes, control our search rankings, and help us comparison shop. We use bots to book travel, for online customer support, and even to turn our lights on and off and unlock our doors.

Yet, for every ‘good’ bot, there is a nefarious one designed to disrupt, steal or manipulate. Indeed, at least one third of all Internet traffic is populated by a spectrum of ‘bad’ bots. On one end, there are the manipulative bots, like those designed to buy out retailers’ inventory to resell high-demand goods at markup (like limited edition sneakers or ticket scalping) or simulate advertiser click counts. On the other, more extreme end, malicious bots take over accounts, conduct API abuse and enslave our IoT devices to launch massive DDoS attacks.

Equally troubling is the speed at which the bot ecosystem is evolving. Like most criminal elements, threat actors are singularly focused in their goals: They constantly update, mutate, and modify their tool sets to work around the various protections companies put in place.

[You may also like: The Evolution of IoT Attacks]

In other words, what protected your organization against bots last year may not work today. Research from Radware’s 2018 State of Web Application Security Report shows that most organizations rely on tools like Captcha to detect their bot traffic, but modern, sophisticated bots can easily bypass those tools, making it difficult to even detect bot traffic, let alone identify the bot’s intentions.

Organizations need to look for bot management solutions that not only effectively detect and mitigate bot attacks but can also distinguish between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ bots in real-time.

Yesterday, Radware announced its intent to acquire ShieldSquare, which is a pioneer in the bot mitigation industry and one of three recognized solution leaders by Forrester with strong differentiation in the Attack Detection, Threat Research, Reporting, and Analytics categories.

The strong technology synergy between the two companies around advanced machine learning and the opportunity to extend Radware’s existing cloud security services bring a tremendous advantage to our customers and partners.

[You may also like: 9 Ways to Ensure Cloud Security]

This acquisition allows Radware to expand our portfolio with more robust bot management solutions that can stand alone as product offerings as well as integrate into our suite of attack mitigation solutions. Radware will offer ShieldSquare’s bot management and mitigation product under the new Radware Bot Management product line. It enhances Radware’s advanced anti-bot capabilities from multi-protocol IoT DDoS attacks to more crafted e-commerce attacks affecting six emerging problems:

  • Data harvesting and Scraping Attacks
  • Account creation and Account Takeover Attacks
  • Denial of Inventory
  • Application DDoS & Brute Force Attacks
  • Brand Image / Reputation Attacks

It also provides ShieldSquare’s customers with access to the full suite of Radware security and availability solutions both on-prem and in the cloud, including our Cloud WAF services for comprehensive protection of applications.

We look forward to welcoming the ShieldSquare team into the Radware family and joining forces to offer some of the world’s best bot management solutions.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

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Attack Types & VectorsBotnetsSecurity

Ad Fraud 101: How Cybercriminals Profit from Clicks

January 3, 2019 — by Daniel Smith1

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Fraud is and always will be a cornerstone of the cybercrime community. The associated economic gains provide substantial motivation for today’s malicious actors, which is reflected in the rampant use of identity and financial theft, and ad fraud. Fraud is, without question, big business. You don’t have to look far to find websites, on both the clear and the darknet, that profit from the sale of your personal information.

Fraud-related cyber criminals are employing an evolving arsenal of tactics and malware designed to engage in these types of activities. What follows is an overview.

Digital Fraud

Digital fraud—the use of a computer for criminal deception or abuse of web enabled assets that results in financial gain—can be categorized and explained in three groups for the purpose of this blog: basic identity theft with the goal of collecting and selling identifiable information, targeted campaigns focused exclusively on obtaining financial credentials, and fraud that generates artificial traffic for profit.

Digital fraud is its own sub-community consistent with typical hacker profiles. You have consumers dependent on purchasing stolen information to commit additional fraudulent crime, such as making fake credit cards and cashing out accounts, and/or utilizing stolen data to obtain real world documents like identification cards and medical insurance. There are also general hackers, motivated by profit or disruption, who publicly post personally identifiable information that can be easily scraped and used by other criminals. And finally, there are pure vendors who are motivated solely by profit and have the skills to maintain, evade and disrupt at large scales.

[You may also like: IoT Hackers Trick Brazilian Bank Customers into Providing Sensitive Information]

  • Identity fraud harvests complete or partial user credentials and personal information for profit. This group mainly consists of cybercriminals who target databases with numerous attack vectors for the purposes of selling the obtained data for profit. Once the credentials reach their final destination, other criminals will use the data for additional fraudulent purposes, such as digital account takeover for financial gains.
  • Banking fraud harvests banking credentials, digital wallets and credit cards from targeted users. This group consists of highly talented and focused criminals who only care about obtaining financial information, access to cryptocurrency wallets or digitally skimming credit cards. These criminals’ tactics, techniques and procedures (TTP) are considered advanced, as they often involve the threat actor’s own created malware, which is updated consistently.
  • Ad fraud generates artificial impressions or clicks on a targeted website for profit. This is a highly skilled group of cybercriminals that is capable of building and maintaining a massive infrastructure of infected devices in a botnet. Different devices are leveraged for different types of ad fraud but generally, PC-based ad fraud campaigns are capable of silently opening an internet browser on the victim’s computer and clicking on an advertisement.

Ad Fraud & Botnets

Typically, botnets—the collection of compromised devices that are often referred to as a bot and controlled by a malicious actor, a.k.a. a “bot herder—are associated with flooding networks and applications with large volumes of traffic. But they also send large volumes of malicious spam, which is leveraged to steal banking credentials or used to conduct ad fraud.

However, operating a botnet is not cheap and operators must weigh the risks and expense of operating and maintaining a profitable botnet. Generally, a bot herder has four campaign options (DDoS attacks, spam, banking and ad fraud) with variables consisting of research and vulnerability discovery, infection rate, reinfection rate, maintenance, and consumer demand.

[You may also like: IoT Botnets on the Rise]

With regards to ad fraud, botnets can produce millions of artificially generated clicks and impressions a day, resulting in a financial profit for the operators. Two recent ad fraud campaigns highlight the effectiveness of botnets:

  • 3ve, pronounced eve, was recently taken down by White Owl, Google and the FBI. This PC-based botnet infected over a million computers and utilized tens of thousands of websites for the purpose of click fraud activities. The infected users would never see the activity conducted by the bot, as it would open a hidden browser outside the view of the user’s screen to click on specific ads for profit.
  • Mirai, an IoT-based botnet, was used to launch some of the largest recorded DDoS attacks in history. When the co-creators of Mirai were arrested, their indictments indicated that they also engaged in ad fraud with this botnet. The actors were able to conduct what is known as an impression fraud by generating artificial traffic and directing it at targeted sites for profit. 

[You may also like: Defending Against the Mirai Botnet]

The Future of Ad Fraud

Ad fraud is a major threat to advertisers, costing them millions of dollars each year. And the threat is not going away, as cyber criminals look for more profitable vectors through various chaining attacks and alteration of the current TTPs at their disposal.

As more IoT devices continue to be connected to the Internet with weak security standards and vulnerable protocols, criminals will find ways to maximize the profit of each infected device. Currently, it appears that criminals are looking to maximize their new efforts and infection rate by targeting insecure or unmaintained IoT devices with a wide variety of payloads, including those designed to mine cryptocurrencies, redirect users’ sessions to phishing pages or conduct ad fraud.

Read the “IoT Attack Handbook – A Field Guide to Understanding IoT Attacks from the Mirai Botnet and its Modern Variants” to learn more.

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Application SecurityAttack MitigationAttack Types & VectorsSecurity

10 Most Popular Blogs of 2018

December 27, 2018 — by Radware0

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Between large scale cyberattacks, the implementation of GDPR and increasing popularity of smart home technologies (and their associated vulnerabilities), we had a lot to write about this year. Of the hundreds of blogs we published in 2018, several floated to the top in terms of readership. Below, we recap the ten most popular blogs of 2018.

Consumer Sentiments About Cybersecurity and What It Means for Your Organization

Over the past six months, the data breaches against companies such as Panera BreadDelta Airlines and Sears, and Saks have proven we live in an age where cyberattacks and data breaches are now commonplace. The result? Cybersecurity is no longer just the topic of conversation of tech gurus and IT personnel. It has transitioned into the mainstream conversation and has become a concern of the masses. Consumers are now concerned that the organizations they are conducting business with are proactive about safeguarding their information and how they will fix it if a breach does occur. Read more…

New Threat Landscape Gives Birth to New Way of Handling Cyber Security

With the growing online availability of attack tools and services, the pool of possible attacks is larger than ever. Let’s face it, getting ready for the next cyber-attack is the new normal! This ‘readiness’ is a new organizational tax on nearly every employed individual throughout the world. Amazingly enough, attackers have reached a level of maturity and efficiency – taking advantage of the increased value and vulnerability of online targets, and resulting in a dramatic increase in attack frequency, complexity and size. Read more…

The Evolution of IoT Attacks

IoT devices are nothing new, but the attacks against them are. They are evolving at a rapid rate as growth in connected devices continues to rise and shows no sign of letting up. One of the reasons why IoT devices have become so popular in recent years is because of the evolution of cloud and data processing which provides manufacturers cheaper solutions to create even more ‘things’. Before this evolution, there weren’t many options for manufacturers to cost-effectively store and process data from devices in a cloud or data center.  Older IoT devices would have to store and process data locally in some situations. Today, there are solutions for everyone and we continue to see more items that are always on and do not have to store or process data locally. Read more…

Are Your Applications Secure?

As we close out a year of headline-grabbing data breaches (British Airways, Under Armor, Panera Bread), the introduction of GDPR and the emergence of new application development architectures and frameworks, Radware examined the state of application security in its latest report. This global survey among executives and IT professionals yielded insights about threats, concerns and application security strategies. Read more…

Snapshot of the Most Important Worldwide Cybersecurity Laws, Regulations, Directives and Standards

Are you out of breath from the breakneck pace of cyberattacks since the start of 2018? Throughout the world, nearly daily news reports have been filed detailing the results of incredibly effective cyberattacks ranging from small companies to nation-states. The sum total of these attacks has permanently and dramatically changed the information security threat landscape.  This change hasn’t gone unnoticed with the regulators and now, depending on where your business operates, you have accrued even more work to demonstrate your diligence to these threats. Read more…

Credential Stuffing Campaign Targets Financial Services

Over the last few weeks, Radware has been tracking a significant Credential Stuffing Campaign targeting the financial industry in the United States and Europe. Credential Stuffing is an emerging threat in 2018 that continues to accelerate as more breaches occur. Today, a breach doesn’t just impact the compromised organization and its users, but it also affects every other website that the users may use. Read more…

Is My Smart Home Telling People What I Do Every Day?

The overall smart home market is expected to grow to over $50 billion by 2022.  Already 1 in 4 U.S. households has some kind of smart device in their home.  With all the smart thermostats, smart fridges, smart light bulbs, smart doors and windows, personal assistants, and smart home surveillance, internet-connected home devices are rapidly stacking up in U.S. households. These devices are adding convenience and efficiency, but are they safe? Read more…

Machine Learning Algorithms for Zero Time to Mitigation

Effective DDoS protection combines machine-learning algorithms with negative and positive protection models, as well as rate limiting. The combination of these techniques ensures zero time to mitigation and requires little human intervention. Read more…

Cybersecurity & The Customer Experience: The Perfect Combination

Organizations have long embraced the customer experience and declared it a competitive differentiator. Many executives are quick to focus on the benefits of a loyal-centric strategy and companies now go to great lengths to communicate their organization’s customer centricity to retain existing customers and attract new ones. But where is cybersecurity in this discussion? Read more…

Nigelthorn Malware Abuses Chrome Extensions to Cryptomine and Steal Data

On May 3, 2018, Radware’s cloud malware protection service detected a zero-day malware threat at one of its customers, a global manufacturing firm, by using machine-learning algorithms. This malware campaign is propagating via socially-engineered links on Facebook and is infecting users by abusing a Google Chrome extension (the ‘Nigelify’ application) that performs credential theft, cryptomining, click fraud and more. Read more…

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

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HacksSecurity

2018 In Review: Schools Under Attack

December 19, 2018 — by Daniel Smith0

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As adoption of education technologies expanded in 2018, school networks were increasingly targeted by ransomware, data theft and denial of service attacks; the FBI even issued an alert warning this September as schools reconvened after summer break.

Every school year, new students join schools’ networks, increasing its risk of exposure. Combined with the growing complexity of connected devices on a school’s network and the use of open-source learning management systems (like Blackboard and Moodle), points of failure multiply. While technology can be a wonderful learning aid and time saver for the education sector, an insecure, compromised network will create delays and incur costs that can negate the benefits of new digital services.

The Vulnerabilities

Some of the biggest adversaries facing school networks are students and the devices they bring onto campus. For example, students attending college typically bring a number of internet-connected devices with them, including personal computers, tablets, cell phones and gaming consoles, all of which connect to their school’s network and present a large range of potential vulnerabilities. What’s more, the activities that some students engage in, such as online gaming and posting and/or trolling on forums, can create additional cybersecurity risks.

In an education environment, attacks–which tend to spike at the beginning of every school year–range from flooding the network to stealing personal data, the effects of which can be long-lasting. Per the aforementioned FBI alert, cyber actors exploited school IT systems by hacking into multiple school district servers across the United States in late 2017, where they “accessed student contact information, education plans, homework assignments, medical records, and counselor reports, and then used that information to contact, extort, and threaten students with physical violence and release of their personal information.” Students have also been known to DoS networks to game their school’s registration system or attack web portals used to submit assignments in an attempt to buy more time.

[You may also like: So easy, a child can do it: 15% of Americans think a grade-schooler can hack a school]

Plus, there are countless IoT devices on any given school network just waiting for a curious student to poke. This year we saw the arrest and trial of Paras Jha, former Rutgers student and co-author of the IoT botnet Mirai, who did just that. Jha pleaded guilty to not only creating the malware, but also to click fraud and targeting Rutgers University with the handle ExFocus. This account harassed the school on multiple occasions and caused long and wide-spread outages via DDoS attacks from his botnet.

What’s more, some higher education networks are prime targets of nation states who are looking to exfiltrate personal identifiable data, research material or other crucial or intellectual property found on a college network.

Why Schools?

As it turns out, school networks are more vulnerable than most other types of organizations. On top of an increased surface attack area, schools are often faced with budgetary restraints preventing them from making necessary security upgrades.

[You may also like: School Networks Getting Hacked – Is it the Students’ Fault?]

Schools’ cybersecurity budgets are 50 percent lower than those in financial or government organizations, and 70 percent lower than in telecom and retail. Of course, that may be because schools estimate the cost of an attack at only $200,000–a fraction of the $500,000 expected by financial firms, $800,000 by retailers, and the $1 million price tag foreseen by health care, government, and tech organizations. But the relatively low estimated cost of an attack doesn’t mean attacks on school networks are any less disruptive. Nearly one-third (31 percent) of attacks against schools are from angry users, a percentage far higher than in other industries. Some 57 percent of schools are hit with malware, the same percentage are victims of social engineering, and 46 percent have experienced ransom attacks.

And yet, 44 percent of schools don’t have an emergency response plan. Hopefully 2019 will be the year schools change that.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

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BotnetsBrute Force AttacksDDoS AttacksPhishing

Top 6 Threat Discoveries of 2018

December 18, 2018 — by Radware1

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Over the course of 2018, Radware’s Emergency Response Team (ERT) identified several cyberattacks and security threats across the globe. Below is a round-up of our top discoveries from the past year. For more detailed information on each attack, please visit DDoS Warriors.

DemonBot

Radware’s Threat Research Center has been monitoring and tracking a malicious agent that is leveraging a Hadoop YARN (Yet-Another-Resource-Negotiator) unauthenticated remote command execution to infect Hadoop clusters with an unsophisticated new bot that identifies itself as DemonBot.

After a spike in requests for /ws/v1/cluster/apps/new-application appeared in our Threat Deception Network, DemonBot was identified and we have been tracking over 70 active exploit servers that are actively spreading DemonBot and are exploiting servers at an aggregated rate of over 1 million exploits per day.

[You may also like: IoT Botnets on the Rise]

Credential Stuffing Campaign

In October, Radware began tracking a credential stuffing campaign—a subset of Bruce Force attacks—targeting the financial industry in the United States and Europe.

This particular campaign is motivated by fraud. Criminals are using credentials from prior data breaches to gain access to users’ bank accounts. When significant breaches occur, the compromised emails and passwords are quickly leveraged by cybercriminals. Armed with tens of millions of credentials from recently breached websites, attackers will use these credentials, along with scripts and proxies, to distribute their attack against the financial institution to take over banking accounts. These login attempts can happen in such volumes that they resemble a distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack.

DNS Hijacking Targets Brazilian Banks

This summer, Radware’s Threat Research Center identified a hijacking campaign aimed at Brazilian Bank customers through their IoT devices, attempting to gain their bank credentials.

The research center had been tracking malicious activity targeting DLink DSL modem routers in Brazil since early June. Through known old exploits dating from 2015, a malicious agent is attempting to modify the DNS server settings in the routers of Brazilian residents, redirecting all their DNS requests through a malicious DNS server. The malicious DNS server is hijacking requests for the hostname of Banco de Brasil (www.bb.com.br) and redirecting to a fake, cloned website hosted on the same malicious DNS server, which has no connection whatsoever to the legitimate Banco de Brasil website.

[You may also like: Financial Institutions Must Protect the Data Like They Protect the Money]

Nigelthorn Malware

In May, Radware’s cloud malware protection service detected a zero-day malware threat at one of its customers, a global manufacturing firm, by using machine-learning algorithms. This malware campaign is propagating via socially-engineered links on Facebook and is infecting users by abusing a Google Chrome extension (the ‘Nigelify’ application) that performs credential theft, cryptomining, click fraud and more.

Further investigation by Radware’s Threat Research group revealed that this group has been active since at least March 2018 and has already infected more than 100,000 users in over 100 countries.

[You may also like: The Origin of Ransomware and Its Impact on Businesses]

Stresspaint Malware Campaign

On April 12, 2018, Radware’s Threat Research group detected malicious activity via internal feeds of a group collecting user credentials and payment methods from Facebook users across the globe. The group manipulates victims via phishing emails to download a painting application called ‘Relieve Stress Paint.’ While benign in appearance, it runs a malware dubbed ‘Stresspaint’ in the background. Within a few days, the group had infected over 40,000 users, stealing tens of thousands Facebook user credentials/cookies.

DarkSky Botnet

In early 2018, Radware’s Threat Research group discovered a new botnet, dubbed DarkSky. DarkSky features several evasion mechanisms, a malware downloader and a variety of network- and application-layer DDoS attack vectors. This bot is now available for sale for less than $20 over the Darknet.

As published by its authors, this malware is capable of running under Windows XP/7/8/10, both x32 and x64 versions, and has anti-virtual machine capabilities to evade security controls such as a sandbox, thereby allowing it to only infect ‘real’ machines.

Read the “IoT Attack Handbook – A Field Guide to Understanding IoT Attacks from the Mirai Botnet and its Modern Variants” to learn more.

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HacksSecurity

Cybersecurity as a Selling Point: Retailers Take Note

December 13, 2018 — by Jeff Curley0

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UK-based retailers were no strangers to data breaches in 2018. In June, Dixons Carphone announced a breach of 5.9 million customer bank card details and 1.2 million personal data records, and the following month, Fortnum & Mason likewise warned customers that their data had been exposed. In fact, since GDPR took effect in May, more than 8,000 data breach reports have been filed in the UK. Each of these breaches involved a notification to the affected users which, combined with accompanying news coverage, is creating a cultural shift in cybersecurity awareness and redefining people’s online shopping habits.

The fact is, very few businesses have the luxury of occupying a unique position in the market without direct competition, and security can—and does—play a role in influencing consumer brand loyalty. Case in point: Following its 2015 hack, TalkTalk lost 100,000 customers.

Considering these dynamics, it is vital that consumer-facing companies view security and privacy not just as the thing that saves them from harm, but as a competitive advantage to be leveraged to drive trade at the loss of those that do not.

Security Standards Are Shifting

Currently, it is a mixed picture as to which organisations advertise their security acumen to their competitive advantage. Of the top five retailers in the UK, three have primary navigation links—named “Privacy Centre” or something similar—on their homepages directing users to their security standards.  If I had to guess, I’d say all five top retailers will have a primary link to such a resource by the end of next year.

[You may also like: Consumer Sentiments About Cybersecurity and What It Means for Your Organization]

Online banking institutions appear to be the most acutely aware of security’s influence on customer decision making. This is a perhaps unsurprising, given that their security postures are scored by third party organisations such as Which?, across categories such as two-factor authentication login, encryption, safe navigation and logout.

Since the advent of GDPR—which sets out clear guidelines for companies with regard to how they should store data in their systems, how they should identify and report breaches, and more—we are seeing security positioned as a primary consideration in the build of new online services, so-called ‘data protection by design.’  We could not have conceived of this a new phenomenon prior to GDPR, and it will surely result in a fundamentally different online experience for consumers in the coming years.

The Role of AI in Managing Privacy

Security regulations aren’t the only new influence on managing consumer privacy. New technologies, like AI and IoT devices, are likewise impacting online retail experiences. While the top ten UK retailers don’t currently utilize chatbots or similar AI technology on their websites, chatbots are increasing in popularity among organisations that have complex or diverse product ranges (like H&M’s Virtual Assistant for clothing selection guidance).

[You may also like: Consolidation in Consumer Products: Could it Solve the IoT Security Issues?]

As cutting-edge and “cool” as these are, the reality is that any form of online communications can become a vector for cybersecurity attacks. And the newer a technology is, the more likely it will become a focal point for hackers, since gaps tend to exist in technologies that have yet to establish a solid framework of controls. Just ask Delta Airlines and Sears, which suffered targeted attacks on their third-party chat support provider, exposing customer data and payment information.

One of the primary privacy exposures facing these types of online services is the frequency of change in web applications. Decisions on how and when to secure an application can be lost during interactions between developers and security professionals, particularly when code changes can be upwards of thousands per day. How do you reduce this risk? One way is via the application of machine learning to understand and patrol the “good” behavior of web application use, as opposed to chasing the ever-lengthening tail of “bad” behaviors and deploying access control lists.

The Way Forward

By pushing privacy to the forefront of customer experiences, online retailers can differentiate themselves from competitors. A recent Radware survey discovered just how security conscious UK consumers are: They are liable to abandon brand loyalty in exchange for a secure online shopping experience. Organisations would do well to invest in strong cybersecurity if they want to increase trust and attract new customers at key trading periods. Otherwise, retailers stand to lose their competitive advantage by encouraging customers to exercise their true power, their power to go elsewhere.

Read “Consumer Sentiments: Cybersecurity, Personal Data and The Impact on Customer Loyalty” to learn more.

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Application SecurityAttack MitigationDDoS AttacksSecurity

2018 In Review: Healthcare Under Attack

December 12, 2018 — by Daniel Smith0

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Radware’s ERT and Threat Research Center monitored an immense number of events over the last year, giving us a chance to review and analyze attack patterns to gain further insight into today’s trends and changes in the attack landscape. Here are some insights into what we have observed over the last year.

Healthcare Under Attack

Over the last decade there has been a dramatic digital transformation within healthcare; more facilities are relying on electronic forms and online processes to help improve and streamline the patient experience. As a result, the medical industry has new responsibilities and priorities to ensure client data is kept secure and available–which unfortunately aren’t always kept up with.

This year, the healthcare industry dominated news with an ever-growing list of breaches and attacks. Aetna, CarePlus, Partners Healthcare, BJC Healthcare, St. Peter’s Surgery and Endoscopy Center, ATI Physical Therapy, Inogen, UnityPoint Health, Nuance Communication, LifeBridge Health, Aultman Health Foundation, Med Associates and more recently Nashville Metro Public Health, UMC Physicians, and LabCorp Diagnostics have all disclosed or settled major breaches.

[You may also like: 2019 Predictions: Will Cyber Serenity Soon Be a Thing of the Past?]

Generally speaking, the risk of falling prey to data breaches is high, due to password sharing, outdated and unpatched software, or exposed and vulnerable servers. When you look at medical facilities in particular, other risks begin to appear, like those surrounding the number of hospital employees who have full or partial access to your health records during your stay there. The possibilities for a malicious insider or abuse of access is also very high, as is the risk of third party breaches. For example, it was recently disclosed that NHS patient records may have been exposed when passwords were stolen from Embrace Learning, a training business used by healthcare workers to learn about data protection.

Profiting From Medical Data

These recent cyber-attacks targeting the healthcare industry underscore the growing threat to hospitals, medical institutions and insurance companies around the world. So, what’s driving the trend? Profit. Personal data, specifically healthcare records, are in demand and quite valuable on today’s black market, often fetching more money per record than your financial records, and are a crucial part of today’s Fullz packages sold by cyber criminals.

Not only are criminals exfiltrating patient data and selling it for a profit, but others have opted to encrypt medical records with ransomware or hold the data hostage until their extortion demand is met. Often hospitals are quick to pay an extortionist because backups are non-existent, or it may take too long to restore services. Because of this, cyber-criminals have a focus on this industry.

[You may also like: How Secure is Your Medical Data?]

Most of the attacks targeting the medical industry are ransomware attacks, often delivered via phishing campaigns. There have also been cases where ransomware and malware have been delivered via drive-by downloads and comprised third party vendors. We have also seen criminals use SQL injections to steal data from medical applications as well as flooding those networks with DDoS attacks. More recently, we have seen large scale scanning and exploitation of internet connected devices for the purpose of crypto mining, some of which have been located inside medical networks. In addition to causing outages and encrypting data, these attacks have resulted in canceling elective cases, diverting incoming patients and rescheduling surgeries.

For-profit hackers will target and launch a number of different attacks against medical networks designed to obtain and steal your personal information from vulnerable or exposed databases. They are looking for a complete or partial set of information such as name, date of birth, Social Security numbers, diagnosis or treatment information, Medicare or Medicaid identification number, medical record number, billing/claims information, health insurance information, disability code, birth or marriage certificate information, Employer Identification Number, driver’s license numbers, passport information, banking or financial account numbers, and usernames and passwords so they can resell that information for a profit.

[You may also like: Fraud on the Darknet: How to Own Over 1 Million Usernames and Passwords]

Sometimes the data obtained by the criminal is incomplete, but that data can be leveraged as a stepping stone to gather additional information. Criminals can use partial information to create a spear-phishing kit designed to gain your trust by citing a piece of personal information as bait. And they’ll move very quickly once they gain access to PHI or payment information. Criminals will normally sell the information obtained, even if incomplete, in bulk or in packages on private forums to other criminals who have the ability to complete the Fullz package or quickly cash the accounts out. Stolen data will also find its way to public auctions and marketplaces on the dark net, where sellers try to get the highest price possible for data or gain attention and notoriety for the hack.

Don’t let healthcare data slip through the cracks; be prepared.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

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