Adaptive Managed Services Bolster Security

By Jason Ford, Chief Technology Officer of BlackMesh

The benefits of relying on a managed service provider are seemingly endless. Managed services can help organizations focus on business strategies, conserve funds and resources, mitigate risks, and maintain, operate, and deploy environments. In recent years, however, the IT industry has come to a crossroad where managed services meet security. With the current threats of cyber hacks and intrusion methods being what they are, security is as important – or perhaps more important – to system owners as any other advantages they garner from a managed service provider. While championing the incomparable value correlated with having a powerful and dependable infrastructure without having to manage it, enterprises now can – and do – feel the same about managed security services.

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A View from the Corner Offices: New Research on C-Suite Security Mindset

The role of the modern information security executive is, in many ways, an unenviable position. The continuous pressure to protect increasingly sensitive data and systems that are decreasingly under direct control from a rapidly advancing threat landscape is enough to keep any CIO/CISO up at night. The challenges and intensities of this role make the input and perspective of those executives that fill it of particular interest and relevance as a factor of the evolving security landscape. Recognizing the weight of this audience’s perspective, we recently conducted a survey of more than 200 C-level security executives from the U.S. and United Kingdom to probe on recent and forthcoming trends and their likely impacts. The findings reveal some consistencies and some variance across geographies and when compared to the inputs of security practitioners deeper within their organizations.

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School Networks Getting Hacked – Is it the Students’ Fault?

School networks are increasingly becoming victims of cyber-attacks. They are presented with unique threats and challenges that most organizations do not have to deal with. Every year schools see thousands of new students that bring with them an arsenal of potentially vulnerable devices. To add to this growing complexity, most college campuses have migrated to digital platforms like Blackboard and Moodle. These online web portals are prime targets for denial of service attacks.

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Your Right to Privacy

If George Orwell was alive today, he would probably be considered an optimist as far as our right to privacy goes. That’s the perspective of our Vice President of Security Solutions and cyber security expert, Carl Herberger. Last week, Carl sat down for a Facebook LIVE event to discuss our right to privacy, and how to defend against it in the face of growing security threats. He discusses a number of recent hacks, including those on financial institutions, the healthcare system, and even dating websites, like Ashley Madison. He also addressed a number of questions from followers, such as what we should avoid posting on social media, how online privacy works, and what expectations of privacy we should have in an age of the Internet of Things and constant data breaches.

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The Not-So Odd Couple of DDoS and WAF

As the saying goes in the real world, “necessity is the mother of invention.” However, those of us that work in the technology sector know that this isn’t always the starting point or source in our arena. There are volumes of cautionary tales and vast, virtual graveyards of “products looking for a problem to solve.” Often, these come about when vendors look across their technology portfolio and identify logical interactions that only they can see. Other times they occur through overzealous business development efforts, a sort of unfortunate “you got your chocolate in my peanut butter” scenario where the result tastes anything but sweet.

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Fraud on the Darknet: How to Own Over 1 Million Usernames and Passwords

Over the last several weeks, we have all become conditioned to mega leaks. 117 million from LinkedIn, 360 million from MySpace, 68 million from Tumblr and 127 million from Badoo. That’s over a half a billion emails and usernames up for grabs! This is a gold mine for hackers. Researchers are not the only ones that obtain and analyze leaked databases. Often times, hackers will keep databases for themselves so they can conduct malicious activity with the credentials.

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