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Application Delivery

Load Balancers and Microservices

November 28, 2017 — by Prakash Sinha0

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Many organizations, such as Netflix and Amazon, are using microservice architecture to implement business applications as a collection of loosely coupled services. Some of the reasons to move to this distributed, loosely coupled architecture is to enable hyperscale, and continuous delivery for complex applications, among other things. Teams in these organizations have adopted Agile and DevOps practices to deliver applications quickly and to deploy them with a lower failure rate than traditional approaches. However, you have to balance the complexity that comes with a distributed architecture with the application needs, scale requirements and time-to-market constraints.

Application Delivery

Securing Applications: Why ECC and PFS Matter

September 26, 2017 — by Prakash Sinha0

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Many of us are familiar with Secure Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTPS) that uses a cryptographic protocol commonly referred to as Transport Layer Security (TLS) to secure our communication on the Internet. In simple terms, there are two keys, one available to everyone via a certificate, called a public key and the other available to the recipient of the communication, called a private key. When you want to send encrypted communication to someone, you use the receiver’s public key to secure that communication channel. Once secured, this communication can only be decrypted by the recipient who has the private key.

Application Delivery

Agile, DevOps and Load Balancers: Evolution of Network Operations

July 18, 2017 — by Prakash Sinha0

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Many organizations have a guidance to cut IT spending while rolling out secure application services in a continuous delivery model. Many R&D teams in these organizations have adopted Agile and DevOps practices to enable faster delivery. The goal of Agile and DevOps practices is to deliver applications quicker and to deploy them with a lower failure rate than traditional approaches.

Application Delivery

Trends in Software Defined Data Centers

March 29, 2017 — by Prakash Sinha0

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I recently met with a regional cloud service provider (CSP) that has adopted provisioning on demand as their IT model. They spin up applications on demand, having virtualized most of their infrastructure and have developed tools to automate the provisioning of applications and servers for customers/tenants through a self-service portal.  Rather than build-out and manage more and more physical infrastructure, with associated time and expense, the CSP is adopting the concepts of software-defined data center (SDDC) that builds on virtualization (of software, networking and storage) to offer software and network services for many different clients. More importantly, the CSP is also catering to needs of DevOps and IT architects – both internally, and externally for its tenants/clients by enabling true self service through automation.

Application DeliverySecurity

HTTP/2 is Here – What Now?

November 16, 2016 — by Prakash Sinha0

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Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is the protocol used primarily for communication between the user’s browser and the websites that users are accessing. Introduced in 1991, with a major revision in 1999 to HTTP 1.1, HTTP protocol has many limitations. In 2009, engineers at Google redesigned the protocol in a research project called SPDY (pronounced “speedy”) to address some of HTTP 1.1 limitations.

Websites in the early 90’s when HTTP was introduced were markedly different from today’s websites. In February 2015 the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) introduced a new version, HTTP/2, to keep up with the evolution that internet has undergone since the early 90’s.

Cloud SecuritySecurity

Shadow IT – Security and DR concerns?

September 6, 2016 — by Prakash Sinha0

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According to Gartner, on average, 28 percent of IT spend occurs outside the IT department today. IT behind IT’s back, commonly called shadow IT, is primarily driven by easily available cloud services. Mobile growth and work shifting practices enables the shadow IT further with employees’ desire to work from anywhere. Shadow IT are typically services and applications that an organization’s IT department has had no role in selecting or vetting, and IT may not even be aware that these services and applications are being used within the network.

Convenience and productivity are often the drivers for adopting shadow IT. Employees deploy solutions that are not approved by their IT departments and many times, the reasoning is that going through the traditional route for approvals is too complicated or time consuming.