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Application Delivery

Single Sign On (SSO) Use Cases

May 24, 2018 — by Prakash Sinha0

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SSO reduces password fatigue for users having to remember a password for each application. With SSO, a user logs into one application and then is able to sign into other applications automatically, regardless of the domain the user is in in or the technology in use. SSO makes use of a federation services or login page that orchestrates the user credentials between multiple applications.

Application Delivery

Operational Visibility for Load Balanced Traffic in SDDC

March 13, 2018 — by Prakash Sinha0

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Management and monitoring in Software Defined Data Centers (SDDC) benefit from automation principles, programmability, API and policy-driven provisioning of application environments through self-service templates. These best practices help application owners to define, manage and monitor their own environments, while benefiting from the performance, security, business continuity and monitoring infrastructure from the IT teams. SDDC also changes the way IT designs and thinks about infrastructure – the goal is to adapt to demands of continuous delivery needs of application owners in a “cloudy” world.

Application Delivery

Load Balancers and Elastic Licensing

February 22, 2018 — by Prakash Sinha1

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Last week I met with a very large enterprise in finance that has adopted provisioning on demand. They spin up applications on demand, having virtualized most of their infrastructure and have developed tools to automate the provisioning of applications and servers for customers and internal application developers through self-service applications.

Application Delivery

Load Balancers and Microservices

November 28, 2017 — by Prakash Sinha0

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Many organizations, such as Netflix and Amazon, are using microservice architecture to implement business applications as a collection of loosely coupled services. Some of the reasons to move to this distributed, loosely coupled architecture is to enable hyperscale, and continuous delivery for complex applications, among other things. Teams in these organizations have adopted Agile and DevOps practices to deliver applications quickly and to deploy them with a lower failure rate than traditional approaches. However, you have to balance the complexity that comes with a distributed architecture with the application needs, scale requirements and time-to-market constraints.

Application Delivery

Securing Applications: Why ECC and PFS Matter

September 26, 2017 — by Prakash Sinha0

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Many of us are familiar with Secure Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTPS) that uses a cryptographic protocol commonly referred to as Transport Layer Security (TLS) to secure our communication on the Internet. In simple terms, there are two keys, one available to everyone via a certificate, called a public key and the other available to the recipient of the communication, called a private key. When you want to send encrypted communication to someone, you use the receiver’s public key to secure that communication channel. Once secured, this communication can only be decrypted by the recipient who has the private key.