main

Application Delivery

Trends in Software Defined Data Centers

March 29, 2017 — by Prakash Sinha0

sddc-960x634.jpg

I recently met with a regional cloud service provider (CSP) that has adopted provisioning on demand as their IT model. They spin up applications on demand, having virtualized most of their infrastructure and have developed tools to automate the provisioning of applications and servers for customers/tenants through a self-service portal.  Rather than build-out and manage more and more physical infrastructure, with associated time and expense, the CSP is adopting the concepts of software-defined data center (SDDC) that builds on virtualization (of software, networking and storage) to offer software and network services for many different clients. More importantly, the CSP is also catering to needs of DevOps and IT architects – both internally, and externally for its tenants/clients by enabling true self service through automation.

Application DeliverySecurity

HTTP/2 is Here – What Now?

November 16, 2016 — by Prakash Sinha0

http-2-2-960x638.jpg

Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) is the protocol used primarily for communication between the user’s browser and the websites that users are accessing. Introduced in 1991, with a major revision in 1999 to HTTP 1.1, HTTP protocol has many limitations. In 2009, engineers at Google redesigned the protocol in a research project called SPDY (pronounced “speedy”) to address some of HTTP 1.1 limitations.

Websites in the early 90’s when HTTP was introduced were markedly different from today’s websites. In February 2015 the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) introduced a new version, HTTP/2, to keep up with the evolution that internet has undergone since the early 90’s.

Cloud SecuritySecurity

Shadow IT – Security and DR concerns?

September 6, 2016 — by Prakash Sinha0

shadow-it-2-2-960x670.png

According to Gartner, on average, 28 percent of IT spend occurs outside the IT department today. IT behind IT’s back, commonly called shadow IT, is primarily driven by easily available cloud services. Mobile growth and work shifting practices enables the shadow IT further with employees’ desire to work from anywhere. Shadow IT are typically services and applications that an organization’s IT department has had no role in selecting or vetting, and IT may not even be aware that these services and applications are being used within the network.

Convenience and productivity are often the drivers for adopting shadow IT. Employees deploy solutions that are not approved by their IT departments and many times, the reasoning is that going through the traditional route for approvals is too complicated or time consuming.

Application DeliverySSLWeb Application Firewall

Microsoft TMG Replacement Blues?

July 26, 2016 — by Prakash Sinha1

microsoft-tmg-replacement-3-960x640.png

Microsoft has discontinued Forefront Unified Access Gateway (UAG) and Forefront Threat Management Gateway (TMG), solutions for remote application access control, security and optimization. Microsoft UAG/TMG evolved over many years to integrate multiple functions to protect Microsoft applications. It is a key component of several Microsoft application deployments including Microsoft Exchange, SharePoint and Lync. However, the TMG and UAG deployments are not limited to protecting Microsoft applications.

Securing web applications accessible over the web is a complex task. A compromise may lead to a significant performance hit to the application, especially when under an attack that may impact business, or worse, security breaches.

Application DeliveryWPO

Cloud Load Balancing – Does your provider have what it takes?

June 14, 2016 — by Prakash Sinha0

cloud-load-balancing-3-960x705.png

Cloud computing brings cost efficiency and deployment flexibility to applications. These advantages are driving the demand for cloud-enabled applications. The move to the cloud raises concerns for service levels such as availability, security, and on-demand scalability for the applications.

For many years, application delivery controllers (ADCs) have been integral to addressing service level needs for enterprise applications deployed on premise. As data centers consolidate, end users connect remotely from a variety of locations with varied devices. Many enterprise applications are typically not designed out of the box to meet today’s quality of experience (QoE) needs.