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Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

1984 to 2018: The Evolution of the Olympics

February 21, 2018 — by Daniel Smith0

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Change is inevitable and it happens in every industry. Those that evolve with change often help lead the transformation and revolutionize their domain. In 2016 we began to enter the era of digital transformation in our industry and changes have begun to take place that are revolutionizing the way we consume, collect and deliver data to every aspect of society. Along with these changes have we seen the creation of new businesses and opportunities centered around this evolution in connectivity. Digitization is creating growth opportunities and offering user experiences in ways we have never seen before.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Are You Protected Against Burst Attacks?

February 15, 2018 — by Amir Dahan0

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Common DDoS attacks come in the form of sustained, high-volume traffic floods that ramp up gradually, reach a peak, and are then followed by either a slow or a sudden descent. In recent years, a new attack pattern has emerged. Bursts attacks, also known as hit-and-run DDoS, use repeated short bursts of high-volume attacks at random intervals. Each short burst can last only a few seconds, while a burst attack campaign can span hours or even days. These attacks unleash hundreds of gigabits per second of throughput toward its target.

Security

You Need a New Approach to Stop Evasive Malware

February 14, 2018 — by Eyal Arazi0

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Evasive malware has become a key threat to businesses’ sensitive data. Stealing and selling sensitive data on the Darknet is a lucrative business for hackers, who increasingly rely on evasive malware to penetrate corporate networks.

A study by Verizon found that over 50% of data breaches involve the usage of malware in some capacity. Indeed, some of the largest and best-known data breaches on record, such as Target, Anthem Health, The Home Depot and the U.S. Federal Office of Personnel Management (OPM) were the result of evasive malware running undetected in the network over long periods. These organizations all have large security teams, massive IT budgets and multi-layered anti-malware protections. And yet, in each of these cases these defenses were all circumvented by evasive malware.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Is My Smart Home Telling People What I Do Every Day?

February 13, 2018 — by Mike O'Malley0

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2017 will forever be known as the year that the smart home started to take off.  Researchers estimate that Amazon has sold over 15 million Echo devices  to date. Plus, Google has sold another 5 million Google Homes.  The overall smart home market is expected to grow to over $50 billion by 2022.  Already 1 in 4 U.S. households has some kind of smart device in their home.  With all the smart thermostats, smart fridges, smart light bulbs, smart doors and windows, personal assistants, and smart home surveillance, internet-connected home devices are rapidly stacking up in U.S. households. These devices are adding convenience and efficiency, but are they safe?

BotnetsDDoSDDoS AttacksSecurity

New Satori Botnet Variant Enslaves Thousands of Dasan WiFi Routers

February 12, 2018 — by Radware0

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Overview

On February 8th, 2018, Radware’s Deception Network detected a significant increase in malicious activity over port 8080. Further investigation uncovered a new variant of the Satori botnet capable of aggressive scanning and exploitation of CVE-2017-18046 – Dasan Unauthenticated Remote Code Execution. Referred to as “Satori.Dasan,” it’s been rapidly expanding with a high success rate. The C2/Exploit server for this botnet is 185.62.188.88 (AS49349 – BlazingFast LLC, Ukraine)

It is not clear what is the purpose of this new botnet, as we were unable to find specific attack vectors in the binary.

Our analysis suggests that Satori is looking to take over 40,000 IoT devices to join its growing family of cryptocurrency miners, as we saw here, and here. This would make the Satori.dasan malware a stage #1 infection, responsible for rapidly scanning the internet looking for vulnerable devices.

Network Coverage

Over the past two days Radware has detected over 2000 malicious Unique IPs daily, almost 10 times higher than the daily average in the weeks prior.

The majority of the traffic came from Vietnam originating almost entirely from an ISP named ‘Viettel.’

A significant percentage of those malicious bots were also listening themselves on port 8080.

By sampling roughly 1000 IPs and querying their server headers, Radware revealed that 95% identified  themselves as running “Dasan Network Solution.”

A quick Shodan search revealed about 40,000 devices listening on port 8080, with over half located in Vietnam, and not surprisingly an ISP named ‘Viettell Corporation.’

Botnet Activity:  Distributed Scanning and Central Exploitation Server

The infected bots will perform aggressive scanning of random IP addresses, exclusively targeting port 8080. Once it finds a suitable target, it notifies a C2 server which immediately attempts to infect it.

See the following sequence captured at one of Radware’s sensors (10.0.0.70):

Step #1

The infected bot sends a half-open stealth-scan SYN request to port 8080. Instead of Ack, a TCP Reset is sent. Typical to Mirai code, the initial TCP SYN packet contains a sequence number identical to the 32bit value of the target victim.

Step #2

After 4 seconds, the bot establishes a 3-way TCP handshake to port 8080

Step #3

The following 113 bytes payload is sent:

Note that this is not the actual exploitation attempt, but rather a screening process to find vulnerable hosts.

Step #4

Radware’s Deception Network sensor is answering the probe with the following response:

The bot closes the connection.

Step #5

Now comes the interesting part.

Notice the timestamp – it is just 106 milliseconds after the last packet and we suddenly get an exploitation attempt from a completely different IP address. This IP belongs to a central exploitation server running on 185.62.188.88

The exploit server sends the following payload over HTTPS port 8080:

Investigating the Malware

The threat actors who operate this C2 Crime Server are responsible for numerous attacks that were recently covered by different security vendors, including Fortinet, 360netlab, SANS.

With some scanning, fuzzing and Open-Source Intelligence (OSINT0) we found some interesting details.

As with previous incidents, the domain rippr.me is used to point to the C2 server.

The following entries have an associated TXT record:

As we saw in the exploit payload, the server is listening on port 7777. Connecting to it brings the following download code:

So let’s get the file and check the contents:

It looks like a downloader that will be running on an infected device. The script downloads several versions of the binary and tries to execute it. If it fails (due to wrong CPU architecture), it will just go over to the next one.

Let’s grab the binaries (and guess some additional ones, like the x86_64). They look quite fresh according to server timestamps:

At the moment, VirusTotal already knows about the C2 address and shows that less than five antivirus products detect the files as malicious. Not very promising right now, but this should improve.

We will use this opportunity to submit some of the binaries that are missing in VT.

Summary

The Satori.Dasan variant is a rapidly growing botnet which utilizes a worm-like scanning mechanism, where every infected host looks for more hosts to infect. In addition, it also has a central C2 server that handles the exploitation itself once the scanners detect a new victim.

Read “2017-2018 Global Application & Network Security Report” to learn more.

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Attack Types & VectorsBotnetsSecurity

DarkSky Botnet

February 8, 2018 — by Yuval Shapira0

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Radware’s Threat Research has recently discovered a new botnet, dubbed DarkSky. DarkSky features several evasion mechanisms, a malware downloader and a variety of network- and application-layer DDoS attack vectors. This bot is now available for sale for less than $20 over the Darknet.

As published by its authors, this malware is capable of running under Windows XP/7/8/10, both x32 and x64 versions, and has anti-virtual machine capabilities to evade security controls such as a sandbox, thereby allowing it to only infect ‘real’ machines.

Security

What Does a Windstorm in Wyoming Have to Do with Cyber Security?

February 7, 2018 — by Carl Herberger0

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Natural disasters serve as excellent examples of the unforeseen consequences that a cyber-attack against infrastructure will have. Take for example a strong windstorm in Wyoming in February 2017. The storm knocked down power lines, forcing water and sewage treatment plants to operate on backup generators, which weren’t available to some of the pumps that moved sewage from low-lying areas to higher ground. As a result, the sewers backed up after the weather continued to prolonged the outage. While government officials tasked with disaster planning have long focused on the cascading effects of power outages from natural disasters, only recently have they realized the effects of cyber warfare could be quite similar.

Security

How Secure is Your Medical Data?

February 6, 2018 — by Louis Scialabba0

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Imagine getting online with your doctor on the other end of the streaming connection, and then sending her real-time data of your blood pressure and glucose levels for real-time analysis and consultation.  It’s convenient, it’s timely, and it’s altogether probably cheaper than making a visit to the office.  But is your information secure?  Who else might be snooping on the data you are sending?  The risk is probably higher than you think, and the reward for malicious cyber criminals is certainly worth their time and effort.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

2018 Winter Olympics

January 31, 2018 — by Daniel Smith0

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As the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang approaches, Radware’s Emergency Response Team (ERT) and Threat Research Center turn their attention to the large crowds and target-rich environments created by high-profile events once again. With over 1.07 million tickets available for 102 events over 16 days, spread out across two clusters and containing a total of 12 venues, the crowds at the 2018 Winter Olympics will bring a large demand for connectivity. This enormous demand for connectivity and technology at the Winter Olympics will also pose a security risk for Olympic organizers, partners, sponsors, suppliers, service providers, athletes and attendees.