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IoT, 5G Networks and Cybersecurity – Part 1: The Rise of 5G Networks

August 16, 2018 — by Louis Scialabba0

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Smartphones today have more computing power than the computers that guided the Apollo 11 moon landing. From its original positioning of luxury, mobile devices have become a necessity in numerous societies across the globe.

With recent innovations in mobile payment such as Apple Pay, Android Pay, and investments in cryptocurrency, cyberattacks have become especially more frequent with the intent of financial gain. In the past year alone, hackers have been able to mobilize and weaponize unsuspected devices to launch severe network attacks. Working with a North American service provider, Radware investigations found that about 30% of wireless network traffic originated from mobile devices launching DDoS attacks.

Each generation of network technology comes with its own set of security challenges.

How Did We Get Here?

Starting in the 1990s, the evolution of 2G networks enabled service providers the opportunity to dip their toes in the water that is security issues, where their sole security challenge was the protection of voice calls. This was resolved through call encryption and the development of SIM cards.

Next came the generation of 3G technology where the universal objective (at the time) for a more concrete and secure network was accomplished. 3G networks became renowned for the ability to provide faster speeds and access to the internet. In addition, the new technology provided better security with encryption for voice calls and data traffic, minimizing the impact and damage levels of data payload theft and rogue networks.

Fast forward to today. The era of 4G technology has evolved the mobile ecosystem to what is now a mobile universe that fits into our pockets. Delivering significantly faster speeds, 4G networks also exposed the opportunities for attackers to exploit susceptible devices for similarly quick and massive DDoS attacks. More direct cyberattacks via the access of users’ sensitive data also emerged – and are still being tackled – such as identity theft, ransomware, and cryptocurrency-related criminal activity.

The New Age

2020 is the start of a massive rollout of 5G networks, making security concerns more challenging. The expansion of 5G technology comes with promises of outstanding speeds, paralleling with landline connection speeds. The foundation of the up-and-coming network is traffic distribution via cloud servers. While greatly benefitting 5G users, this will also allow attackers to equally reap the benefits. Without the proper security elements in place, attackers can wreak havoc with their now broadened horizons of potential chaos.

What’s Next?

In the 5G universe, hackers can simply attach themselves to a 5G connection remotely and collaborate with other servers to launch attacks of a whole new level. Service providers will have to be more preemptive with their defenses in this new age of technology. Because of the instantaneous speeds and low lag time, they’re in the optimal position to defend against cyberattacks before attackers can reach the depths of the cloud server.

2018 Mobile Carrier Ebook

Discover more about what the 5G generation will bring, both benefits and challenges, in Radware’s e-book “Creating a Secure Climate for your Customers” today.

Download Now

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Malicious Cryptocurrency Mining: The Road Ahead

August 14, 2018 — by Fabio Palozza0

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As cryptomining continues to rule the cybercrime scenario, cybercriminals are designing innovative ways to drain people’s cryptowallets. Scammers are still doing their best to make the most out of their resources to launch leading-edge scam attempts. The increase in scams is mainly attributed to the failure in implementing appropriate fraud protection measures and unfortunately, popular cryptomining platforms including Coinbase and Bitcoin lack the necessary security features that they need to prevent fraudulent cryptomining activities.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Can SNMP (Still) Be Used to Detect DDoS Attacks?

August 9, 2018 — by Pascal Geenens1

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SNMP is an Internet Standard protocol for collecting information about managed devices on IP networks. SNMP became a vital component in many networks for monitoring the health and resource utilization of devices and connections. For a long time, SNMP was the tool to monitor bandwidth and interface utilization. In this capacity, it is used to detect line saturation events caused by volumetric DDoS attacks on an organization’s internet connection. SNMP is adequate as a sensor for threshold-based volumetric attack detection and allows automated redirection of internet traffic through cloud scrubbing centers when under attack. By automating the process of detection, mitigation time can considerably be reduced and volumetric attacks mitigated through on-demand cloud DDoS services. SNMP provides minimal impact on the device’s configuration and works with pretty much any network device and vendor. As such, it is very convenient and gained popularity for deployments of automatic diversion.

Attack Types & VectorsDDoSSecurity

DNS: Strengthening the Weakest Link

August 2, 2018 — by Radware0

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One in three organizations hit by DDoS attacks experienced an attack against their DNS server. Why is DNS such an attractive target? What are the challenges associated with keeping it secure? What attack vectors represent the worse of the worst when it comes to DNS assaults? Based on research from Radware’s 2017-2018 Global Application & Network Security Report, this piece answers all those questions and many more.

Security

Drive-By Cryptomining: Another Way Cyber-Criminals Are Trying to Evade Detection

August 1, 2018 — by Fabio Palozza0

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By the end of the last year, we saw a drastic rise in drive-by cryptocurrency mining activities and it is quite alarming to note that cyber-criminals are getting smarter and smarter day-by-day at avoiding detection. Interestingly, cyber-criminals can deploy drive-by cryptocurrency mining to target a much wider audience compared to what they would typically achieve by delivering malware-based miners to machines.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

What Should You Do When Your Identity Has Been Compromised?

July 26, 2018 — by Daniel Smith0

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Almost every day, someone calls me to inquire about how to deal with a compromised identity. It has become so common that I have come to the point of just assuming everyone has had their identity compromised in some way, shape or form after the last few years of large-scale data breaches[1].

In 2018, the trend of large data breaches continues with electronic toymaker Vtech settling for $650,000 after suffering a data breach that resulted in exposed personal information about millions of children. Just in the last few months, major breaches targeting payment processing systems at Chili’s, Rail Europe and Macy’s have occurred, resulting in the exposure of customers’ credit card details such as card numbers, CCV codes, expiration dates and in some cases additional information like addresses, phone numbers and emails.