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Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

1984 to 2018: The Evolution of the Olympics

February 21, 2018 — by Daniel Smith0

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Change is inevitable and it happens in every industry. Those that evolve with change often help lead the transformation and revolutionize their domain. In 2016 we began to enter the era of digital transformation in our industry and changes have begun to take place that are revolutionizing the way we consume, collect and deliver data to every aspect of society. Along with these changes have we seen the creation of new businesses and opportunities centered around this evolution in connectivity. Digitization is creating growth opportunities and offering user experiences in ways we have never seen before.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Are You Protected Against Burst Attacks?

February 15, 2018 — by Amir Dahan0

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Common DDoS attacks come in the form of sustained, high-volume traffic floods that ramp up gradually, reach a peak, and are then followed by either a slow or a sudden descent. In recent years, a new attack pattern has emerged. Bursts attacks, also known as hit-and-run DDoS, use repeated short bursts of high-volume attacks at random intervals. Each short burst can last only a few seconds, while a burst attack campaign can span hours or even days. These attacks unleash hundreds of gigabits per second of throughput toward its target.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Is My Smart Home Telling People What I Do Every Day?

February 13, 2018 — by Mike O'Malley0

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2017 will forever be known as the year that the smart home started to take off.  Researchers estimate that Amazon has sold over 15 million Echo devices  to date. Plus, Google has sold another 5 million Google Homes.  The overall smart home market is expected to grow to over $50 billion by 2022.  Already 1 in 4 U.S. households has some kind of smart device in their home.  With all the smart thermostats, smart fridges, smart light bulbs, smart doors and windows, personal assistants, and smart home surveillance, internet-connected home devices are rapidly stacking up in U.S. households. These devices are adding convenience and efficiency, but are they safe?

Attack Types & VectorsBotnetsSecurity

DarkSky Botnet

February 8, 2018 — by Yuval Shapira0

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Radware’s Threat Research has recently discovered a new botnet, dubbed DarkSky. DarkSky features several evasion mechanisms, a malware downloader and a variety of network- and application-layer DDoS attack vectors. This bot is now available for sale for less than $20 over the Darknet.

As published by its authors, this malware is capable of running under Windows XP/7/8/10, both x32 and x64 versions, and has anti-virtual machine capabilities to evade security controls such as a sandbox, thereby allowing it to only infect ‘real’ machines.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

2018 Winter Olympics

January 31, 2018 — by Daniel Smith0

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As the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang approaches, Radware’s Emergency Response Team (ERT) and Threat Research Center turn their attention to the large crowds and target-rich environments created by high-profile events once again. With over 1.07 million tickets available for 102 events over 16 days, spread out across two clusters and containing a total of 12 venues, the crowds at the 2018 Winter Olympics will bring a large demand for connectivity. This enormous demand for connectivity and technology at the Winter Olympics will also pose a security risk for Olympic organizers, partners, sponsors, suppliers, service providers, athletes and attendees.

Attack Types & VectorsDDoSSecurity

Has Cyber Security Reached Its Limits?

January 16, 2018 — by Ben Zilberman0

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Thoughts from Radware’s Global Application and Network Security Report

  • Rise of cryptocurrency trade and value boosts attacks;
  • Notorious attacks of the year point at the human factor to blame;
  • Machine-learning technologies are not fully mature nor broadly adopted;
  • Despite a notion of tolerance, in one of four cases customers will take action against a targeted organization;
  • IoT devices power more effective DDoS attacks, but nobody takes responsibility to patch the known holes;
  • Data Leakage is the number one concern of organizations today.

These are just a handful of insights from Radware’s 2017-2018 Global Application and Network Security Report, providing a comprehensive view of the industry trends and evolutions. 2017 was an eventful year, with global cyber-attack campaigns that grabbed headlines in mainstream media and affected the lives of many, in particular the WannaCry, NotPetya and BadRabbit ransom sprees, as well as Equifax and Forever 21 data leaks. Let’s take a closer look at 2017 trends and 2018 predictions:

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

The Radware Research Roundup

December 28, 2017 — by Radware0

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As 2017 comes to a close, we decided to take a look back at a number of new attack types and threats that we saw throughout the year. Our team took a deep dive into researching and testing many of these threats to find out how they operate and how big of a threat they really were, through setting up honeypots, intentionally bricking a colleague’s device, and setting up IoT chatbots. Below are some of the highlights from our year: