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Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Chatting With IoT Bots

August 1, 2017 — by Pascal Geenens0

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After the Dyn attack by Mirai in October 2016, we knew we were facing an infliction point which would reshape the DDoS threat landscape for the coming months or years. The Internet of Things (IoT) would become an important part of that new landscape. After the attack, the inadequate security state of IoT and the unsophisticated nature of the botnets exploiting IoT devices such as IP cameras, DVRs and routers became apparent and the center of attention of many security researchers and reporters. IoT became the playground for many new bots and slowly turned into a battleground where bad bots, white-hat bots and vigilante bots are battling for ever-growing numbers of poorly designed and insecure devices.

Attack Types & VectorsDDoSSecurity

Gaming – Legitimate vs. Malicious Users

July 20, 2017 — by Daniel Smith0

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Over the years Radware has followed the evolution of DDoS attacks directed at the gaming industry. For the industry, large-scale DDoS attacks can result in network outages or service degradation and has become an everyday occurrence. In 2016 Lizard Squad and Poodle Corp launched repeated attacks against EA, Blizzard and Riot Games, resulting in service degradation and outages for users around the world.

Attack Types & VectorsDDoSSecurity

Eliminating Single Points of Failure, Part 2

July 6, 2017 — by Louis Scialabba0

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The Risk DDoS Attacks Pose to Enterprises

What is the impact of a DDoS Attack?

Denial of Service attacks affect enterprises from all sectors (e-gaming, Banking, Government etc.), all sizes (mid/big enterprises) and all locations. They target the network layer up through the application layer, where attacks are more difficult to detect since they can easily get confused with legitimate traffic.
A denial of service attack generates high or low rate attack traffic exhausting computing resources of a target, therefore preventing legitimate users from accessing the website. A DDoS attack can always cause an outage, but often they have the stealth impact of slowing down network performance in way that enterprise IT teams do not even realize the network is under attack and simply think the network is congested, not knowing the congestion is actually caused by an attack.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

My Network has High Cholesterol

June 22, 2017 — by Ben Zilberman0

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5 out of 6 businesses struggle daily with low profile DDoS attacks that consume their bandwidth and resources and pose a burden, resulting in poor service level and customer experience

You know how when you get to a certain age, feeling ‘good’ is not good enough? Well it might be good for your everyday life – obviously, you don’t need to extract the most out of your brain and muscles for the day-to-day to-do’s, but there is no guarantee that there is nothing there that negatively impacts your performance, or may be silently growing.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

Eliminating Single Points of Failure, Part 1

June 21, 2017 — by Louis Scialabba0

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The Risk DDoS Attacks Pose to Enterprises

The Role of the Firewall

A Firewall is a necessary first step in protecting an enterprise network by establishing a barrier between a trusted, secure internal network and another outside untrusted network such as the Internet. Firewalls have evolved considerably over the years, with the advent of next-generation firewalls to add application-aware filtering and intrusion detection capabilities and help customers improve their first line of defense. However, DDoS attacks are one vector where Firewalls are commonly the point of failure. In fact, Radware’s own research shows that the firewall is the cause of downtime during DDoS attacks roughly one-third of the time. The reason for this is the stateful nature of these devices, required to keep track of open sessions and transactions on the network. Maintaining session state requires use of session tables as well as other CPU resources that are finite and also responsible for other security features. Therefore under attack, the session table can be exhausted causing the firewall to fail.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

SMB Vulnerabilities – WannaCry, Adylkuzz and SambaCry

June 15, 2017 — by Daniel Smith1

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Last month on Friday, May 12th a global incident related to a ransomware variant named WannaCry broke out, targeting computers around the world. Everything from personal computers to corporate and university networks were affected by this campaign. The campaign spread across networks leveraging a recently disclosed vulnerability in Microsoft SMB service. On March 14th 2017, Microsoft released MS17-010, a security update, that addressed and patched six CVEs. Five were remote code executions and the sixth was related to information disclosure.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

BrickerBot only attacks compromised devices

May 18, 2017 — by Pascal Geenens0

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BrickerBot uses a network of globally distributed devices that are passively detecting exploit attempts from devices infected with IoT bots such as Mirai and Hajime. BrickerBot reacts to an exploit attempt by scanning the source of the exploit for a set number of ports, trying to secure the device (assumption based on Janit0r statements) and if not able to, ultimately attempting to brick the device using exactly 90 brick sequences over the telnet session.

As long as IoT devices stay clean from any of the known IoT bots, there is no reason to fear the BrickerBot. While Hajime might have the best of intentions and is trying to proactively protect IoT devices from known malicious bots, it inadvertently will trigger the wrath of BrickerBot.

Attack Types & VectorsSecurity

WannaCrypt

May 16, 2017 — by Daniel Smith0

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Over the last few days, Radware’s Security Research Groups have been monitoring a global incident related to a ransomware variant named WannaCrypt, also known as WannaCry, WanaCrypt0r and wcry. On the morning of Friday May 12th, a ransomware campaign began targeting computers around the world. Once a computer was infected, a worm replicated itself across the network, targeting other computers as well. Worms use a computer network to propagate to other machines and infect them with the malicious payload.