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Botnets

Bot or Not? Distinguishing Between the Good, the Bad & the Ugly

January 8, 2019 — by Anna Convery-Pelletier1

Bots touch virtually every part of our digital lives. They help populate our news feeds, tell us the weather, provide stock quotes, control our search rankings, and help us comparison shop. We use bots to book travel, for online customer support, and even to turn our lights on and off and unlock our doors.

Yet, for every ‘good’ bot, there is a nefarious one designed to disrupt, steal or manipulate. Indeed, at least one third of all Internet traffic is populated by a spectrum of ‘bad’ bots. On one end, there are the manipulative bots, like those designed to buy out retailers’ inventory to resell high-demand goods at markup (like limited edition sneakers or ticket scalping) or simulate advertiser click counts. On the other, more extreme end, malicious bots take over accounts, conduct API abuse and enslave our IoT devices to launch massive DDoS attacks.

Equally troubling is the speed at which the bot ecosystem is evolving. Like most criminal elements, threat actors are singularly focused in their goals: They constantly update, mutate, and modify their tool sets to work around the various protections companies put in place.

[You may also like: The Evolution of IoT Attacks]

In other words, what protected your organization against bots last year may not work today. Research from Radware’s 2018 State of Web Application Security Report shows that most organizations rely on tools like Captcha to detect their bot traffic, but modern, sophisticated bots can easily bypass those tools, making it difficult to even detect bot traffic, let alone identify the bot’s intentions.

Organizations need to look for bot management solutions that not only effectively detect and mitigate bot attacks but can also distinguish between ‘good’ and ‘bad’ bots in real-time.

Yesterday, Radware announced its intent to acquire ShieldSquare, which is a pioneer in the bot mitigation industry and one of three recognized solution leaders by Forrester with strong differentiation in the Attack Detection, Threat Research, Reporting, and Analytics categories.

The strong technology synergy between the two companies around advanced machine learning and the opportunity to extend Radware’s existing cloud security services bring a tremendous advantage to our customers and partners.

[You may also like: 9 Ways to Ensure Cloud Security]

This acquisition allows Radware to expand our portfolio with more robust bot management solutions that can stand alone as product offerings as well as integrate into our suite of attack mitigation solutions. Radware will offer ShieldSquare’s bot management and mitigation product under the new Radware Bot Management product line. It enhances Radware’s advanced anti-bot capabilities from multi-protocol IoT DDoS attacks to more crafted e-commerce attacks affecting six emerging problems:

  • Data harvesting and Scraping Attacks
  • Account creation and Account Takeover Attacks
  • Denial of Inventory
  • Application DDoS & Brute Force Attacks
  • Brand Image / Reputation Attacks

It also provides ShieldSquare’s customers with access to the full suite of Radware security and availability solutions both on-prem and in the cloud, including our Cloud WAF services for comprehensive protection of applications.

We look forward to welcoming the ShieldSquare team into the Radware family and joining forces to offer some of the world’s best bot management solutions.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

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Anna Convery-Pelletier

Anna Convery-Pelletier joined Radware as the Chief Marketing officer in December 2016. As a member of the executive leadership team, she leads the global marketing organization, which consists of the corporate, product, field and channel marketing teams. Ms. Convery is responsible for the marketing strategy that shapes the future of the Radware brand while directly increasing the marketing contribution to drive revenue and increase market share. Prior to Radware, Ms. Convery held the position of Chief Marketing Officer and Executive Vice President of Strategy for OpenSpan Inc. (now Pega Systems Inc.) for five years. Ms. Convery has more than 25 years’ experience in enterprise technology, helping FORTUNE 500 companies drive operational and financial excellence, leveraging technology innovation to deliver digital transformation and world-class customer experience. At OpenSpan, Ms. Convery’s responsibilities included global go-to-market strategy and strategic enterprise growth for the company. Prior to OpenSpan, Ms. Convery held senior executive roles at NICE Systems Ltd., ClickFox, Inc., and Nexidia Inc., as well as global marketing and business development roles at IBM Corporation, Jacada Ltd. and Unibol Inc. Named a “Woman of the Year in Technology” by Women in Technology (WIT), Ms. Convery has received numerous industry awards and is a respected customer experience and enterprise transformation thought leader.

One comment

  • Jim Burden

    March 28, 2019 at 9:37 am

    The problem is not security technology. It is global policing and internet standards laws backed up mostly with internationally enforced mandatory company owner, investors, CEOs, managers, consultant jail sentences. Fines are nice but reasonably short based on fraudulent or racketeering and political power manipulation defined intent gets perpetrators attention. Countries and companies that do not cooperate in enforcement and shared regulatory oversight simplynlosse national connections to the global internet. User internet detection soft ware and reporting systems need to be improved and made self sllearting. Variations of these ideas already have existed for decades but sometimes are used as scams in themselves to extract extorted fees or one time payments from people in variations of organized crime protection rackets. Google is the world’s biggest offender not the Russians.

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