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Application DeliveryCloud Computing

Application Delivery Use Cases for Cloud and On-Premise Applications

April 23, 2019 — by Prakash Sinha1

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Most of us use web applications in our daily lives, whether at work or for personal reasons. These applications include sites offering banking and financial services, payroll, utilities, online training, just to name a few. Users get frustrated, sometimes annoyed, if the applications – such as bank account access, loading of a statement, emails, or bills – are slow to respond. Heaven help us if we lose these services right in the middle of a payment!

data center, servers, application delivery controllers, ADCs, ADC
White and blue firewall activated on server room data center 3D rendering

If you look at these applications from a service provider perspective, especially those that have web facing applications, this loss of customer interest or frustration is expensive and translates into real loss of revenue, almost $8,900 per minute of downtime in addition to loss of customer satisfaction and reputation. And if your services are in the cloud and you don’t have a fall back? Good luck…

Traditional Use of ADCs for Applications

This is where application delivery controllers (ADCs), commonly referred to as load balancers, come in. ADCs focus on a few aspects to help applications. ADCs make it seem to the user that the services being accessed are always up, and in doing so, reduce the latency that a user perceives when accessing the application. ADCs also help in securing and scaling the applications across millions of users.

[You may also like: Ensuring a Secure Cloud Journey in a World of Containers]

Traditionally, these load balancers were deployed as physical devices as a redundant pair, then as virtualization took hold in the data centers, ADCs began to be deployed as virtual appliance. Now, as applications move to cloud environments, ADCs are being deployed as a service in the cloud, or as a mix of virtual, cloud and physical devices (depending on cost and desired performance characteristics, as well the familiarity and expertise of the administrator of these services – DevOps, NetOps or SecOps).

The ADC World is Changing

The world of ADCs is changing rapidly. Due to the fast changing world of applications, with micro-services, agile approach, continuous delivery and integration, there are many changes afoot in the world of ADCs.

ADCs still have the traditional job of making applications available locally in a data center or globally across data centers, and providing redundancy to links in a data center. In addition to providing availability to applications, these devices are still used for latency reduction – using caching, compressions and web performance optimizations – but due to where they sit in the network, they’ve taken on additional roles of a security choreographer and a single point of visibility across a variety of different applications.

[You may also like: Embarking on a Cloud Journey: Expect More from Your Load Balancer]

We are beginning to see additional use cases, such as web application firewalls for application protection, SSL inspection for preventing leaks of sensitive information, and single sign on across many applications and services. The deployment topology of the ADC is also changing – either run within a container for load balancing and scaling micro-services and embedded ADCs, or be able to provide additional value-add capabilities to the embedded ADCs or micro-services within a container.

Providing high availability is one of the core use cases for an ADC. HA addresses the need for an application to recover from failures within and between data centers themselves. SSL Offload is also considered a core use case. As SSL and TLS become pervasive to secure and protect web transactions, offloading non-business functions from application and web servers so that they may be dedicated to business processing is needed not only to reduce application latency but also to lower the cost of application footprint needed to serve users.

As users connecting to a particular application service grow, new instances of application services are brought online in order to scale applications. Scaling-in and scaling-out in an automated way is one of the primary reasons why ADCs have built-in automation and integrations with orchestration systems. Advanced automation allows ADCs to discover and add or remove new application instances to the load balancing pool without manual intervention. This not only helps reduce manual errors and lowers administrative costs, but also removes the requirements for all users of an ADC to be experts.

[You may also like: Digital Transformation – Take Advantage of Application Delivery in Your Journey]

As we move to the cloud, other uses cases are emerging and quickly becoming a necessity. Elastic licensing, for example, is directed to cap the cost of licenses as organizations transition from physical hardware or virtual deployment to the cloud. Another use case is to provide analytics and end-to-end visibility, designed to pin-point root a cause of an issue quickly without finger-pointing between networking and application teams.

ADCs at the Intersection of Networking and Applications

Since ADCs occupy an important place between applications and networks, it’s quite logical to see ADCs take on additional responsibilities, as applications serve the users. Application delivery and load balancing technologies have been the strategic components providing availability, optimization, security and latency reduction for applications. In order to enable seamless migration of business critical applications to the cloud, the same load balancing and application delivery infrastructure has evolved to  address the needs of continuous delivery/integration, hybrid and multi-cloud deployments.

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

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Application Delivery

Keeping Pace in the Race for Flexibility

February 27, 2019 — by Radware2

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Flexibility and elasticity. Both rank high on the corporate agenda in the age of digital transformation and IT is no exception. From the perspective of IT, virtualization and cloud computing have become the de facto standard for deployment models. They provide the infrastructure elasticity to make business more agile and higher performing and are the reason why the majority of organizations today are operating within a hybrid infrastructure, one that combines on-premise with cloud-based and/or virtualized assets.

But to deliver the elasticity promised by these hybrid infrastructures requires data center solutions that deliver flexibility. As a cornerstone for optimizing applications, application delivery controllers (ADCs) have to keep pace in the race for flexibility. The key is to ensure that your organization’s ADC fulfills key criteria to improve infrastructure planning, flexibility and operational expenses.

One License to Rule Them All

Organizations should enjoy complete agility in every aspect of the ADC service deployment. Not just in terms of capabilities, but in terms of licensing . Partner with an ADC vendor that provides an elastic, global licensing model.

Organizations often struggle with planning ADC deployments when those deployments span hybrid infrastructures and can be strapped with excess expenses by vendors when pre-deployment calculations result in over-provisioning. A global licensing model allows organizations to pay only for capacity used, be able to allocate resources as needed and add virtual ADCs at a moment’s notice to match specific business initiatives, environments and network demands.

[You may also like: Maintaining Your Data Center’s Agility and Making the Most Out of Your Investment in ADC Capacity]

The result? Dramatically simplified ADC deployment planning and a streamlined transition to the cloud.

An ADC When and Where You Need It

This licensing mantra extends to deployment options and customizations as well. Leading vendors provide the ability to deploy ADCs across on-premise and cloud-based infrastructures, allowing customers to transfer ADC capacity from physical to cloud-based data centers. Ensure you can deploy an ADC wherever, whenever they are required, at the click of a button, at no extra cost and with no purchasing complexity.

Add-on services and capabilities that go hand-in-hand with ADCs are no exception either. Web application firewalls (WAF), web performance optimization (WPO), application performance monitoring…companies should enjoy the freedom to consume only required ADC services rather than overspending on bells and whistles that will sit idle collecting dust.

Stay Ahead of the Curve

New standards for communications and cryptographic protocols can leave data center teams running amok attempting to keep IT infrastructure updated. They can also severely inhibit application delivery.

Take SSL/TLS protocols. Both are evolving standards that ensure faster encrypted communications between client and server, improved security and application resource allocation without over-provisioning. It allows IT to optimize the performance of applications and optimize costs during large scale deployments.

[You may also like: The ADC is the Key Master for All Things SSL/TLS]

Combining the flexibility of an ADC that supports the latest standards with an elastic licensing model is a winning combination, as it provides the most cost-effective alternative for consuming ADC services for any application.

Contain the Madness

The goal of any ADC is to ensure each application is performing at its best while optimizing costs and resource consumption. This is accomplished by ensuring that resource utilization is always tuned to actual business needs.

Leading ADC vendors allow ADC micro-services to be added to individual ADC instances without increasing the bill. By supporting container orchestration engines such as Kubernetes, it allows the organization to adopt their ADC to the application capacity. This also simplifies the addition of services such as SSL or WAF to individual instances or micro-services.

[You may also like: Simple to Use Link Availability Solutions]

Finding an ADC vendor that addresses all these considerations requires expanding the search from focusing on mainstream vendors. To drive flexibility via IT elasticity means considering all the key ADC capabilities and licensing nuances critical to managing and optimizing today’s diversified IT infrastructure. Remember these three
keys when evaluating ADC vendors:

  • An ADC licensing model should be an catalyst for cutting infrastructure expenditures, not increasing them.
  • An ADC licensing model should provide complete agility in ever aspect of your ADC deployment.
  • An ADC license should allow IT to simplify and automate IT operational processes.

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

Download Now

Application DeliveryCloud Computing

Ensuring a Secure Cloud Journey in a World of Containers

December 11, 2018 — by Prakash Sinha0

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As organizations transition to the cloud, many are adopting microservice architecture to implement business applications as a collection of loosely coupled services, in order to enable isolation, scale, and continuous delivery for complex applications. However, you have to balance the complexity that comes with such a distributed architecture with the application security and scale requirements, as well as time-to-market constraints.

Many application architects choose application containers as a tool of choice to implement the microservices architecture. Among its many advantages, such as resource footprint, instantiation time, and better resource utilization, containers provide a lightweight run time and a consistent environment for the application—from development to testing to a production deployment.

That said, adopting containers doesn’t remove the traditional security and application availability concerns; application vulnerabilities can still be exploited. Recent ransomware attacks highlight the need to secure against DDoS and application attacks.

[You may also like: DDoS Protection is the Foundation for Application, Site and Data Availability]

Security AND availability should be top-of-mind concerns in the move to adopt containers.

Let Your Load Balancer Do the Heavy Lifting

For many years, application delivery controllers (ADCs), a.k.a. load balancer, have been integral to addressing service-level needs for applications, deployed on premise or on the cloud, to meet availability and many of the security requirements of the applications.

Layered security is a MUST: In addition to using built-in tools for container security, traditional approaches to security are still relevant. Many container-deployed services are composed using Application Programming Interfaces (APIs). Since these services are accessible over the web, they are open to malicious attacks.

As hackers probe network and application vulnerability to gain access to sensitive data, the prevention of unauthorized access needs to be multi-pronged as well:

  • Preventing denial of service attacks
  • Routine vulnerability assessment scans on container applications
  • Scanning application source code for vulnerabilities and fixing them
  • Preventing malicious access by validate users before they can access a container application.
  • Preventing rogue application ports/applications from running
  • Securing the data at rest and in motion.

Since ADCs terminate user connections, scrubbing the data with a web application firewall (WAF) will help identify and prevent malicious attacks, while authenticating users against an identity management system to prevent unauthorized access to a container service.

Availability is not just a nice-to-have: A client interacting with a microservices-based application does not need to know about the instances that’s serving it. This is precisely the isolation and decoupling that a load balancer provides, thus ensuring availability in case one of the instances becomes unavailable.

Allocating and managing it manually is not an option:  Although there are many benefits to a container-based application, it is a challenge to quickly roll out, troubleshoot, and manage these microservices. Manually allocating resources for applications and re-configuring the load balancer to incorporate newly instantiated services is inefficient and error prone. It becomes problematic at scale, especially with those that have short lifetimes. Automating the deployment of services quickly becomes a necessity. Automation tools transform the traditional manual approach into simpler automated scripts and tasks that do not require deep familiarity or expertise.

[You may also like: Embarking on a Cloud Journey: Expect More from Your Load Balancer]

If you don’t monitor, you won’t know: When deploying microservices that may affect many applications, proactive monitoring, analytics and troubleshooting become critical before they become business disruptions. Monitoring may include information about a microservice such as latency, security issues, service uptime, and problems of access.

Businesses must support complex IT architectures for their application delivery in a secure manner. Configuring, deploying and maintaining cross-domain microservices can be error-prone, costly and time-consuming. Organizations should be concerned with ensuring security with a layered approach to security controls. To simplify configuration and management of these microservices, IT should adopt automation, visibility, analytics and orchestration best practices and tools that fit in with their agile and DevOps processes. The goal is to keep a secure and controlled environment mandated by IT without losing development agility and automation needs of the DevOps.

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

Download Now

Application DeliveryCloud ComputingCloud Security

Embarking on a Cloud Journey: Expect More from Your Load Balancer

November 13, 2018 — by Prakash Sinha0

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Many enterprises are in transition to the cloud, either building their own private cloud, managing a hybrid environment – both physical and virtualized—or deploying on a public cloud. In addition, there is a shift from infrastructure-centric environments to application-centric ones. In a fluid development environment of continuous integration and continuous delivery, where services are frequently added or updated, the new paradigm requires support for needs across multiple environments and across many stakeholders.

When development teams choose unsupported cloud infrastructure without IT involvement, the network team loses visibility, and security and cost control is accountable over the service level agreement (SLA) provided once the developed application goes live.

The world is changing. So should your application delivery controller.

Application delivery and load balancing technologies have been the strategic component providing availability, optimization, security and latency reduction for applications. In order to enable seamless migration of business critical applications to the cloud, the same load balancing and application delivery infrastructure must now address the needs of continuous delivery/integration, hybrid and multi-cloud deployments.

[You may also like: Digital Transformation – Take Advantage of Application Delivery in Your Journey]

The objective here is not to block agile development and use of innovative services, but to have a controlled environment, which gives the organization the best of both DevOps and IT– that is, to keep a secure and controlled environment while enabling agility. The benefits speak for themselves:

Reduced shadow IT initiatives
To remain competitive, every business needs innovative technology consumable by the end‐user. Oftentimes, employees are driven to use shadow IT services because going through approval processes is cumbersome, and using available approved technology is complex to learn and use. If users cannot get quick service from IT, they will go to a cloud service provider for what they need. Sometimes this results in short‐term benefit, but may cause issues with organizations’ security, cost controls and visibility in the long-term. Automation and self-service address CI/CD demands and reduce the need for applications teams to acquire and use their own unsupported ADCs.

Flexibility and investment protection at a predictable cost
Flexible licensing is one of the critical elements to consider. As you move application delivery services and instances to the cloud when needed, you should be able to reuse existing licenses across a hybrid deployment. Many customers initially deploy on public cloud but cost unpredictability becomes an issue once the services scale with usage.

[You may also like: Load Balancers and Elastic Licensing]

Seamless integration with an SDDC ecosystem
As you move to private or public cloud, you should be able to reuse your investment in the orchestration system of your environment. Many developers are not used to networking or security nomenclature. Using self-service tools with which developers are familiar quickly becomes a requirement.

The journey from a physical data center to the cloud may sometimes require investments in new capabilities to enable migration to the new environment. If an application delivery controller capacity is no longer required in the physical data center, its capacity can be automatically reassigned. Automation and self-services applications address the needs of various stakeholders, as well as the flexible licensing and cost control aspects of this journey.

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

Download Now

Application DeliveryCloud Computing

Digital Transformation – Take Advantage of Application Delivery in Your Journey

October 31, 2018 — by Prakash Sinha0

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The adoption of new technologies is accelerating business transformation. In its essence, the digital transformation of businesses uses technologies to drive significant improvement in process effectiveness.

Cloud computing is one of the core technologies for Digital Transformation

Increasing maturity of cloud-based infrastructure enables organizations to deploy business-critical applications in public and private cloud. According to a new forecast from the International Data Corporation (IDCWorldwide Quarterly Cloud IT Infrastructure Tracker, total spending on IT infrastructure for deployment in cloud environments is expected to total $46.5 billion in 2017 with year-over-year growth of 20.9%. Public cloud data centers will account for the majority of this spending, 65.3%, growing at the fastest annual rate of 26.2%.

Many enterprises are in the midst of this transition to the cloud, whether moving to a public cloud, building their own private cloud or managing a hybrid deployment. In this fluid environment, where new services are being frequently added and old ones updated, the new paradigm requires support for needs across multiple environments and across many constituencies – an IT administrator, an application developer, DevOps and tenants.

[You might also like: Optimizing Multi-Cloud, Cross-DC Web Apps and Sites]

Nobody Said It Was Easy!

However, the process of migration of applications to the cloud is not easy. The flexibility and cost benefit that drives the shift to the cloud also presents many challenges – security, business continuity, and application availability, latency reduction, issues with visibility, SLA guarantees and isolation of resources.  Some other aspects that require some thought – licensing, lock-in with a cloud service provider, architecture to address hybrid deployment, shadow IT, automation, user access, user privacy, and compliance needs.

One of the main challenges for enterprises moving to a cloud infrastructure is how to guarantee consistent quality of experience to consumers across multiple applications, many of which are business critical developed using legacy technologies and still hosted on-premise.

Along with the quality of experience, organizations need to look at the security policies. Sometimes policies require integration with a cloud service provider’s infrastructure or require new capabilities to complement on-premises architecture while addressing denial of service, application security and compliance for new attack surface exposed by applications in the cloud.

Convenience and productivity improvements are often the initial drivers for adopting IT services in the cloud. One way to address security and availability concerns for the enterprise embarking on the cloud journey is to ensure that the security and availability are also included as part of IT self-service, orchestration and automation systems, without requiring additional effort from those driving adoptions of cloud-based IT applications.

The World of Application Delivery Has Changed to Adapt!

Application delivery and load balancing technologies have been the strategic components providing availability, optimization, security and latency reduction for applications. In order to enable seamless migration of business-critical applications to the cloud, the same load balancing and application delivery infrastructure has to evolve to address the needs of continuous delivery/integration, hybrid and multi-cloud deployments.

Read the “2018 C-Suite Perspectives: Trends in the Cyberattack Landscape, Security Threats and Business Impacts” to learn more.

Download Now

Application Acceleration & OptimizationApplication DeliverySecurity

DevSecOps Automation? The Roadmap

October 18, 2018 — by Benjamin Maze2

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In my previous blog post, I addressed the need and the process of creating applications faster and building an adaptive infrastructure that suits my real consumption. Today I will highlight how automation can help to ensure that security has an adaptive infrastructure and manages traffic irregularities.

How Can I Guarantee My Security Level?

By using automation, we can also guarantee a level of security on any new application by automatically deploying security rules when a new app is published. No risk of human error or risk to forget something; when a new app is deployed, the security is attached automatically. This is very powerful but needs to be very “industrial”. Exceptions are not the friend of automation; this is very important to standardize applications for use with automation.

IoT is the first threat of a DDoS attack because apps are provisioned very fast, but there is none on the security level. A lot of Botnets are targeting IoT to gain access to many devices. There are several apps and vulnerabilities that hackers can exploit to have access to these devices and create a very large botnet.

Radware can provide automated security services for anti-DDoS and WAF protection on top of ADC services (load balancing, SSL offload, reverse proxy, L7 modification, etc.)

How Can I Have an Adaptive Infrastructure?

With Google Kubernetes, it is very easy to add more containers (or pods) to an application in order to be able to handle more client connections. Kubernetes has its own load balancing mechanisms to share the load between several containers.  However, this service is very limited and cannot give access to all the features that we need on a reverse proxy to expose the application to the rest of the world (nat, SSL offload, L7 load balancing, etc.)

By using intermediate orchestrator for L4-L7 services such as load balancing, DDoS  and WAF – acting as an abstraction layer – this orchestrator can be updated of any changes from Kubernetes and trigger automation workflow to update the infrastructure accordingly:

  • Modify/create/scale up/scale down an ADC service to expose the app outside with full capabilities, including ADC (SSL, NAT, L7 modification, l7 load balancing, persistence, cache, TCP optimization)
  • Modify/create/scale up/scale down DDoS or WAF services to protect this new exposed application

How Can I Manage Exceptional Events That Temporarily Increases My Traffic?

Considering the example of VOD service, we understand that this service will be used differently depending on the time of day. It will experience huge peaks of traffic in the evening when people are watching their TVs but during the day, the traffic will dramatically decrease as most people are at work.

If you scale your application and infrastructure to manage your peak of traffic in the evening, it will cost a lot and this compute will not be used during the day, this is not optimized.

With automation, we can do something smarter by provisioning compute resource accordingly with real needs. That means that my application will run on a few servers during the day and run on several servers during the evening. If I use the public cloud to host my application, I will pay only for my consumption and will not pay for a lot of computing power during the day that I don’t use.

Again, this agility should be at the application layer but also at the infrastructure layer. My ADC, anti-DDoS or WAF services should not be scalable for my peak traffic in the evening but should be adaptive with my real load.

Using an intermediate automation orchestrator can provide an intelligent workflow to follow this trend. In the evening, it can automatically provision new ADC, DDoS, or WAF services on new hosts to provide more computing power and handle a lot of client requests.  Then, de-provision it when they are not needed.

It is important to also have a flexible license model with a license server that dynamically dispatches the license to the ADC, WAF, or DDoS services.

Conclusion

With an intermediate orchestrator, Radware technologies can be used in complex SDDC environment. It provides an abstraction layer based on a workflow that simplifies integration with an external tool like Ansible, Cisco ACI, Juniper Contrail, OpenStack, and Google Kubernete.

vDirect exposes a rest API that is used to trigger a workflow. For example, a workflow can “manage virtual service” with 3 actions:

  • Create a new virtual service (real server, server group, load balancing algorithm, health check, DDoS, WAF, etc.)
  • Modify an existing virtual service (add a real server, change DDoS rules, change load balancing algorithms, etc.)
  • Delete an existing virtual service (delete ADC, DDoS, WAF, configuration).

From an external orchestrator, REST calls are very simple with only one REST call on workflow “manage virtual service”. With all necessary parameters, vDirect can do all the automation on Radware devices such as ADC, anti-DDoS, and WAF.

Read “Radware’s 2018 Web Application Security Report” to learn more.

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Application DeliverySecuritySSL

Adopt TLS 1.3 – Kill Two Birds with One Stone

September 13, 2018 — by Prakash Sinha14

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Transport Layer Security (TLS) version 1.3 provides significant business benefits by making applications more secure, improving performance and reducing latency for the client. Changes in how handshake between client and server is designed has decreased site latency – utilizing a faster handshake, and use of Elliptic Curve (EC) based ciphers that allow faster page load time. TLS 1.3 also enforces forward security to prevent a replay of all recorded data if private session keys are compromised.

Transport Level Security – A Quick Recap

Transport Layer Security (TLS) version 1.0, the first standardized version of SSL introduced in 1999, which is based on SSL v3.0. TLS 1.0 is obsolete and vulnerable to various security issues, such as downgrade attacks. Payment Card Industry (PCI) had set a migration deadline of June 30, 2018 to migrate to TLS 1.1 or higher.

TLS 1.1, introduced in 2006, is more secure than TLS 1.0 and protected against certain types of Cipher Block Chaining (CBC) attacks such as BEAST. Some TLS 1.1 implementations are vulnerable to POODLE, a form of downgrade attack. TLS 1.1 also removed certain ciphers such as DES, and RC2 which are vulnerable and broken and introduced support for Forward Secrecy, although it is performance intensive.

TLS 1.2, introduced in 2008, added SHA256 as a hash algorithm and replaced SHA-1, which is considered insecure. It also added support for Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) cipher suites, Elliptic Curve Cryptography (ECC), and Perfect Forward Secrecy (PFS) without a significant performance hit. TLS 1.2 also removed the ability to downgrade to SSL v2.0 (highly insecure and broken).

Why TLS 1.3?

TLS 1.3 is now an approved standard of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF).  Sites utilizing TLS 1.3 can expect faster user connections than with earlier TLS standards while making the connections more secure due to the elimination of obsolete and less secure ciphers, server dictating the session security and faster establishment of handshake between client and server. TLS 1.3 eliminates the negotiation on the encryption to use. Instead, in the initial connection the server provides an encryption key, the client provides a session key, and then the connection is made. However, if needed TLS 1.3 provides a secure means to fall back to TLS 1.2 if TLS 1.3 is not supported by the endpoint.

[You might also like: High-Performance Visibility into SSL/TLS Traffic]

TLS 1.3 – Recommendations

To achieve SSL/TLS acceleration and effectively address the growing number and complexity of encrypted web attacks, organizations face serious strategic challenges. We recommend migration to TLS 1.3 to take advantage of significant business benefits and security that the newer standard provides. However, as with any transition to a new standard, be mindful of the adoption risks.

Evaluate the Risks and Plan Migration

The risks may be incompatibility between client and server due to poor implementations and bugs. You may also need to carefully evaluate the impact on devices that implement inspection based on RSA static keys, products that protect against data leaks or implement out of path web application protection based on a copy of decrypted traffic.

  • Adopt a gradual deployment of TLS 1.3 – A crawl-walk-run approach of deploying in QA environments, test sites, and low traffic sites
  • Evaluate or query the “middle box” vendors for compatibility with TLS 1.3, currently, only active TLS 1.3 terminators can provide compatibility
  • Utilize Application Delivery Controllers (ADCs) to terminate TLS 1.3 and front-end servers that are not capable of supporting TLS 1.3

TLS 1.3 provides improved security, forward security to secure data even if private keys are compromised, improved latency and better performance.

Read “2017-2018 Global Application & Network Security Report” to learn more.

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Application Delivery

Considerations for Load Balancers When Migrating Applications to the Cloud

July 31, 2018 — by Prakash Sinha11

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According to a new forecast from the International Data Corporation (IDCWorldwide Quarterly Cloud IT Infrastructure Tracker, total spending on IT infrastructure for deployment in cloud environments is expected to total $46.5 billion in 2017 with year-over-year growth of 20.9%. Public cloud data centers will account for the majority of this spending, 65.3%, growing at the fastest annual rate of 26.2%. Off-premises private cloud environments will represent 13% of cloud IT infrastructure spending, growing at 12.7% year over year. On-premises private clouds will account for 62.6% of spending on private cloud IT infrastructure and will grow 11.5% year-over-year in 2017.

Application Delivery

Application SLA – Knowing is Half the Battle

January 4, 2018 — by Frank Yue0

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In today’s world, digital transformation has changed how people interact with businesses and conduct their work. They interface with applications on the network. These applications need to be responsive and provide a quality of experience that enables people to appreciate the business and the services they provide. When an application degrades in performance, it negatively affects the user’s experience. This negative experience translates to lost value to revenues, brand, and worker productivity.

Application Delivery

Marrying the Business Need With Technology Drive, Part One: Choosing Your Cloud

November 30, 2017 — by Daniel Lakier0

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Several years ago, the monolithic approach to application development fell out of vogue because time to market became the key success metric in our ever-changing world. Agile development started to become the norm and the move to DevOps was born.  At the same time as this change was taking place, there was another ground breaking development: the advent of public clouds.  Either change by itself was industry -impacting but the two happening at the same time, both enabling each other, changed everything.